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Non-railway modelling


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On 02/08/2021 at 17:00, 33C said:

Last week's boot-sale buy. The started badly Spit from a "B.O.B. memorial flight" set. Broken prop, glue stained canopy and all! Came out ok i think? :D20210802_154651.jpg.b6a0c1f7bb6233872d3952efb0e0a4da.jpg

20210802_154716.jpg

 

I've some way to go to get to your level of "Repair, Restore and Repaint" - my hands aren't steady enough to paint canopy frames! - but I've finished off my Matchbox Tempest and Sea Harrier today (or at least as finished as I can be bothered with):

 

IMG_6357.JPG.9ce4117ba87ebce09140843d9bc76930.JPG

 

IMG_6354.JPG.542b35f0250125411173850db5ae9698.JPG

 

I probably bought these around 1984, threw them together but never painted them, so their recent repairs and finishing gives them a build time of perhaps 37 years.  Can anyone beat this dubious record?

Edited by Northmoor
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20 minutes ago, Northmoor said:

 

I've some way to go to get to your level of "Repair, Restore and Repaint" - my hands aren't steady enough to paint canopy frames! - but I've finished off my Airfix Tempest and Matchbox Sea Harrier today (or at least as finished as I can be bothered with):

 

IMG_6357.JPG.9ce4117ba87ebce09140843d9bc76930.JPG

 

IMG_6354.JPG.542b35f0250125411173850db5ae9698.JPG

 

I probably bought these around 1984, threw them together but never painted them, so their recent repairs and finishing gives them a build time of perhaps 37 years.  Can anyone beat this dubious record?

Can't beat that, 8 years for a 1/24 Spit is my record. Like the Typhoon, love the Sea Harrier (with the poseable stand!) Hey, considering what these models cost, they are good value for 37 years entertainment!! :D

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16 hours ago, Northmoor said:

 

 

I probably bought these around 1984, threw them together but never painted them, so their recent repairs and finishing gives them a build time of perhaps 37 years.  Can anyone beat this dubious record?

 

Just about! I posted this back in 2018 so three years old now, but it's Rommel's half-track which I started when staying at my gran's in the late 70s, but which then languished unfinished for 40 odd years until I realised most of the parts were still in the box.

 

halftrack1.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

 

Just about! I posted this back in 2018 so three years old now, but it's Rommel's half-track which I started when staying at my gran's in the late 70s, but which then languished unfinished for 40 odd years until I realised most of the parts were still in the box.

 

halftrack1.jpg

Good Grief! That's nice. :D

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P1050797.JPG.50da807d33f35da35498ae5ff3bc138e.JPG

 

I found these parts in a plastic bag in a bits box.  It's an Airfix Ariel Arrow bike, 1:16th scale. Must have got this in mid 1960s,  so could be 55 years old or so.

 

P1050800.JPG.51af7af86e1669335d90b5d652cc2639.JPG

 

So I thought I'd try putting it together.  Found some instructions on the internet, so I could see where the kick starter, gear lever etc. went.

 

P1050804.JPG.749a41cf8d68d68688541b12d073eb47.JPG

 

And here it is.

It turned out that this was originally a Kitmaster kit, their first and only motorcycle (and had been issued in 1962).   When Rosebud sold up to Airfix,  they got the  bike as well and issued it as Airfix.  Apparently this was the first Kitmaster kit Airfix reissued.  First Airfix release was 1963, last re-issue was 1980.  So a bit of history there.

Ariel Arrow was a 250cc two stroke bike first made in 1960.  20bhp and a bit over 70mph if you were lucky.  But no worries, a little later in the 60s you could buy a Honda 250, cheaper, more economical, faster and leave your mates standing.... 

 

 

 

 

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Progress avec le bus Parisienne:

 

renault.jpg.15f5c1c8c8ba68523bd50f7d4abcb7b1.jpg

 

This has been a one step forward, two steps back build so far. The steering linkage is very flimsy and I managed to break it while working on another part of the bus, so that needed several attempts at repairing. I was in one mind to glue it all up solid (after all, the bus will only sit on a shelf) but in the end managed to get it working again, however it remains fragile. I also made work for myself with the windows. On the main body, I did a dry run when it was partly assembled and convinced myself that - against the instructions - I could clip the window panes in after most of the assembly and painting was done, but this proved to be far from simple and I needed a lot of trimming and persuasion to get the windows to fit. I also had two mishaps with the cab. After painting the frames, I was cleaning my brushes and I must have splashed a bit of heavy-duty paint cleaner on the plastic, leaving two blobs. Unfortunately, by the time I discovered my mistake the morning after, the cleaner had etched into the plastic. The best I could do was attack the whole side panel with fine sandpaper, followed by T-cut and a gloss coat, to get back to something acceptable. I was in two minds about cutting out and replacing the whole window but I was worried about fracturing the whole panel if I did that. Finally, entirely self-inflicted, I painted cream on the front panel where it should be clear, and then had to strip, T-cut and gloss that as well!

 

 

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21 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

Progress avec le bus Parisienne:

 

renault.jpg.15f5c1c8c8ba68523bd50f7d4abcb7b1.jpg

 

This has been a one step forward, two steps back build so far. The steering linkage is very flimsy and I managed to break it while working on another part of the bus, so that needed several attempts at repairing. I was in one mind to glue it all up solid (after all, the bus will only sit on a shelf) but in the end managed to get it working again, however it remains fragile. I also made work for myself with the windows. On the main body, I did a dry run when it was partly assembled and convinced myself that - against the instructions - I could clip the window panes in after most of the assembly and painting was done, but this proved to be far from simple and I needed a lot of trimming and persuasion to get the windows to fit. I also had two mishaps with the cab. After painting the frames, I was cleaning my brushes and I must have splashed a bit of heavy-duty paint cleaner on the plastic, leaving two blobs. Unfortunately, by the time I discovered my mistake the morning after, the cleaner had etched into the plastic. The best I could do was attack the whole side panel with fine sandpaper, followed by T-cut and a gloss coat, to get back to something acceptable. I was in two minds about cutting out and replacing the whole window but I was worried about fracturing the whole panel if I did that. Finally, entirely self-inflicted, I painted cream on the front panel where it should be clear, and then had to strip, T-cut and gloss that as well!

 

 

Looking good. Those front panels can cause trouble - on mine the drivers copy of LeMonde in the cab is hiding some paint bleed from the masking!

You're also right about the flimsy steering - I eventually glued mine straight.

Les

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1 hour ago, Unicorn1 said:

Looking good. Those front panels can cause trouble - on mine the drivers copy of LeMonde in the cab is hiding some paint bleed from the masking!

You're also right about the flimsy steering - I eventually glued mine straight.

Les

 

Thanks, Les!

 

I had another setback today, but unfortunately it's not really fixable. I noticed a crack in the rear passenger window, which I could have fixed before I glued the roof on but which now I'll just have to live with. Luckily it's only visible from certain angles. 

 

Although I've still got some painting to do, I couldn't resist adding some of the transfers.

 

renault2.jpg.1ac021cdc21d8f68a808e2d4767eedf5.jpg

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On 16/08/2021 at 14:23, railroadbill said:

P1050797.JPG.50da807d33f35da35498ae5ff3bc138e.JPG

 

I found these parts in a plastic bag in a bits box.  It's an Airfix Ariel Arrow bike, 1:16th scale. Must have got this in mid 1960s,  so could be 55 years old or so.

 

P1050800.JPG.51af7af86e1669335d90b5d652cc2639.JPG

 

So I thought I'd try putting it together.  Found some instructions on the internet, so I could see where the kick starter, gear lever etc. went.

 

P1050804.JPG.749a41cf8d68d68688541b12d073eb47.JPG

 

And here it is.

It turned out that this was originally a Kitmaster kit, their first and only motorcycle (and had been issued in 1962).   When Rosebud sold up to Airfix,  they got the  bike as well and issued it as Airfix.  Apparently this was the first Kitmaster kit Airfix reissued.  First Airfix release was 1963, last re-issue was 1980.  So a bit of history there.

Ariel Arrow was a 250cc two stroke bike first made in 1960.  20bhp and a bit over 70mph if you were lucky.  But no worries, a little later in the 60s you could buy a Honda 250, cheaper, more economical, faster and leave your mates standing.... 

 

 

 

 

 

Built a few of those back in the last century; often with unfeasible modifications. Never knew it originated with Kitmaster though.

 

@Judge Dread can tell you a few Ariel tales. :mellow:

 

steve

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41 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

 

Yes, let's have a good laugh that those Afghans.

An interesting comment from a man that makes models of machines that kill fellow humans.

 

By the way I didn't mention Afghans or laughing, however as an observation and not an opinion I would say the chap at the 0:22 point does look quite cheery.

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3 minutes ago, Gibbo675 said:

An interesting comment from a man that makes models of machines that kill fellow humans.

 

By the way I didn't mention Afghans or laughing, however as an observation and not an opinion I would say the chap at the 0:22 point does look quite cheery.

 

There's a difference between modelling military subjects (out of an appreciation for the machines and respect for the men who operated them, on both sides) and posting a video of an upsetting scene just for lolz.

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23 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

There's a difference between modelling military subjects (out of an appreciation for the machines and respect for the men who operated them, on both sides) and posting a video of an upsetting scene just for lolz.

 

Very true. I have hidden the original post so please move on.

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26 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

Gibbo675, do not PM me again.

 

To be fair he won't be able to read that as I've removed his access to (yet another) topic. Mind you; he won't be able to PM anyone now. ;)

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On 17/08/2021 at 16:44, steve1 said:

 

Built a few of those back in the last century; often with unfeasible modifications. Never knew it originated with Kitmaster though.

 

@Judge Dread can tell you a few Ariel tales. :mellow:

 

steve

P1050807.JPG.bf1abe3441f7f6298430ecc220e2aef0.JPG

 

Doesn't take up very much room at 1:16th scale.  I thought this was the only 1:16th motorcycle kit Airfix produced, it certainly was the only Kitmaster one.  However, looking on vintage-airfix.com,  there were also kits for a BMW R.69, a BSA C15 (!) and a Honda CB450, a very fast bike in its day. Never seen any of those, but they were produced a long time ago.  Airfix made bigger scale bikes, I once made a Honda CB750 that was 1:8th scale (I've just looked up) which was a nice kit in its day, lots of chromed plastic.

 

The only 1:16th scale bike kit I can find listed now is an MPC Honda CB77, which is the bike that Robert Pirsig rode in "Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance"  (showing my age here).  Pirsig kept the bike in his garage and after he  died several years ago the bike was given to the Smithsonian museum. The MPC kit doesn't seem to be actually available, shown as out of stock everywhere I've looked.  Plenty of larger scale bike kits by Tamiya etc.

 

How about a Pocher 1:4 scale Ducati 1299 panigale kit, 600 parts, chain and brake levers work... already painted, a mere £1499....

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In the past, I have built all of those Airfix 1:16 bikes. The C15 became a chopper(!) with extended forks and a high back seat covered in blue velvet(!!) And sorry, no I don't have any pics. The Honda was a sort of street racer with a custom seat.

 

The BMW lives on, in dark blue and white, in a friend's workshop who owns a real one.

 

steve

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In terms of real bikes the BMW would be the best of the bunch. (Arguably!)

A C15 chopper would be rather mind blowing!  No doubt there were some back in the day...rather than "get your motor running and head out on the highway" it would have been "try desperately hard to get your motor running then give up"....

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Another MiniArt kit. This is sold as a Ford AA truck made under licence in Russia. I decided to ignore that and pretend it is simply an American civilian truck.

IMG_0475a.JPG.d72d990328b26116907303b14900afb6.JPG

 

IMG_0476a.JPG.5d4627ed6253244f2ee47f402bdf1d65.JPG

 

IMG_0477a.JPG.ddceb27a203d0c18b57f02500c3fbccb.JPG

 

The bonnet (hood?) was left as removable so that the engine detail can be revealed.

IMG_0478a.JPG.215ec486bcb6ab82e81b147a3d4223b5.JPG

 

It has been lightly weathered to try and stop it looking like a plastic kit.

Stu

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On 17/08/2021 at 16:16, Barry Ten said:

 

Thanks, Les!

 

I had another setback today, but unfortunately it's not really fixable. I noticed a crack in the rear passenger window, which I could have fixed before I glued the roof on but which now I'll just have to live with. Luckily it's only visible from certain angles. 

 

Although I've still got some painting to do, I couldn't resist adding some of the transfers.

 

renault2.jpg.1ac021cdc21d8f68a808e2d4767eedf5.jpg


Snap! Absolutely cracking kit. 

343244A5-E346-428C-8BCD-EEC792C86CAD.jpeg

13F86516-7D43-4477-936E-674A1DE1A818.jpeg

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