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Non-railway modelling


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On 13/09/2021 at 23:28, PhilH said:


Thanks…hopefully this will turn out to be as good a kit to build. 

D9291DE3-B911-4DC4-AB6E-2A57EC9CA45E.jpeg

That carton seems to show the steering wheel on the wrong side for a  vehicle fabriqué en France.

Perhaps Camions de Pompiers had to spend more time on the wrong side of the road to get to incendies?

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51 minutes ago, Michael Hodgson said:

That carton seems to show the steering wheel on the wrong side for a  vehicle fabriqué en France.

Perhaps Camions de Pompiers had to spend more time on the wrong side of the road to get to incendies?


Nothing so practical, this from a website relating to French manufacturers. This applied to both their cars and commercial vehicles….
’Like many upper-crust makes in France (Talbot, Bugatti) and Italy (Lancia), Delahaye had held onto right-hand drive as a sign of status.’

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1 hour ago, Michael Hodgson said:

That carton seems to show the steering wheel on the wrong side for a  vehicle fabriqué en France.

Perhaps Camions de Pompiers had to spend more time on the wrong side of the road to get to incendies?

Until fairly recent times many European countries with mountainous territories operated vehicles with right hand drive. It was safer on mountain roads for the driver to see the edge of the road. The famous Swiss postal buses were right hand drive as were Swiss and Italian military vehicles.

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It's not just a fiery Gallic temperament that caused their accident rates then!

 

I take the point that having the steering wheel on the nearside has some advantages.  It does make it dangerous to pull out to see whether it's safe to overtake though.   And of course Sweden also drove on the left until 1967, but many Swedes had left hand drive cars already to simplify driving on the rest of the Continent. 

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17 minutes ago, Michael Hodgson said:

It's not just a fiery Gallic temperament that caused their accident rates then!

 

I take the point that having the steering wheel on the nearside has some advantages.  It does make it dangerous to pull out to see whether it's safe to overtake though.   And of course Sweden also drove on the left until 1967, but many Swedes had left hand drive cars already to simplify driving on the rest of the Continent. 

It's the same reason street-sweepers in the UK were very often LHD, it made it much more easy for the driver to follow the kerb.

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When we were little and on holiday in France, my father was explaining to my little brother which side of the road they drive on in a long list of countries.  But when asked about Japan he didn't know the answer and said "Oh, in Japan they drive in the middle of the road" - Steve accepted that and believed it for years!

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2 hours ago, Northmoor said:

It's the same reason street-sweepers in the UK were very often LHD, it made it much more easy for the driver to follow the kerb.

 

The street sweepers from my youth (70s and 80s) had dual controls. It was very odd seeing a steering wheel on both sides of the cab, one moving as if a phantom was driving.

 

Andy

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56 minutes ago, SM42 said:

 

The street sweepers from my youth (70s and 80s) had dual controls. It was very odd seeing a steering wheel on both sides of the cab, one moving as if a phantom was driving.

 

Andy

Give it a few years and we'll have autonomous ones - both steering wheels will be driven by phantoms!

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Hi all

 

finally finished an MPC 1/48 Space 1999 Eagle. 
 

0E78848B-2AF4-4812-940F-38A8880739B8.jpeg.0ad0f0b99647598f3e8ebc4781e46070.jpeg

 

lots of repetitive cleaning up of individual bracing tubes but I got there in the end. 
 

E61C8AFC-4810-47A1-89AD-3CC0D88581B2.jpeg.436014ae8d9c22239707df814830e6d2.jpeg

 

Roger

 

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Interesting models, Steve.   Liked the weld marks on the frame, for instance, and the "metal" finish was very realistic.  Wonder if full sized bikes were actually rideable (more than once, anyway).

 

Your link led me to this which details how they built the models, 3-d printing, soldered brass frames, moulded resin and so on.  http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/topic/153072-bike-build-off-radial-engine-style/

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • RMweb Gold
Posted (edited)

I suppose this might be considered a “railway” but it is an HO gauge model of a traditional roller coaster built from the kit produced by Coaster Dynamix in the US.

 

It’s not quite finished - still need to add some walkways and the handrails - but I’ve got it working.

 

28A8C688-081F-4B69-B2C7-CF0E653F8917.jpeg.105f665c500a5517df9a50fa7811fd19.jpeg

 

B135D683-BBF2-4506-9EF1-D3EFFD8840ED.jpeg.50eddf2b1b50c8e603a7c066efa78ceb.jpeg

 

BF85245D-8A45-4875-99BA-E897D8F0497C.jpeg.280b89d237edb7b5e116d7b4503ae8aa.jpeg

 

EFEADEC2-B6FA-404B-B8C1-C2DCC4C24150.jpeg.0b4d5cabba6f2c580172df695c428d97.jpeg
 

 

Also my first attempt at static grass - applied to the originally pukey green plastic base.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

 

Edited by Darius43
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1 hour ago, Darius43 said:

It’s not quite finished - still need to add some walkways and the handrails - but I’ve got it working.

 

Cor!! How many G's must that be pulling?!

 

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  • RMweb Gold
29 minutes ago, TT-Pete said:

 

Cor!! How many G's must that be pulling?!

 


It’s the abrupt stop before the up ramp that is the punisher.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

 

 

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  • RMweb Gold
4 hours ago, BernardTPM said:

Yes, really it needs to be powered coming down too, to simulate the correct rate of acceleration, not using actualy gravity which is way out of scale.

 

It’s only a model.

 

The initial climb is powered by a spring turned on its axis by a motor - Matchbox Motorway style - in the little shed.  The coaster gets round by gravity and momentum alone.  Slowing down the first descent would prevent it from climbing the second ascent.   The whole thing is very sensitive to being on a level surface etc.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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