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Pictures of Charmouth

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I know that Charmouth is a very quite backwater, but a few trains would be good!

But you KNOW what the trains look like, Mudders

 

Dave

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I know 'I' do, but what about everyone else!!!!

 

Will make a change from the various Southern 00 engines!

 

Will be interesting to see how the K1 looks at Charmouth??

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Will be interesting to see how the K1 looks at Charmouth??

Slightly silly actually, especially hauling half a dozen Welshpool wagons!

 

post-5825-0-84004900-1316294991.jpg

Edited by DLT
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Is there a gradient high to low from left to right of phots 6,7 & 9 of post 1 and phot 1 of post 14 or is it an optical illusion? I ask because the effect (if i not my eyes) just looks terrific, very subtle. Just like the real thing.

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Very nice Dave, yes I know a little out of place, but great looking engine! Are you going to add a crew?

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Slightly silly actually, especially hauling half a dozen Welshpool wagons!

For a loco that started active life in Tasmania, the distance from its Manchester birthplace to Charmouth is trivial. Looks a lovely model, and no doubt it runs like one, too.

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Very nice Dave, yes I know a little out of place, but great looking engine! Are you going to add a crew?

Yes, there will be a crew added, when I get around to finishishing it! It has been further developed since this photo, (must take another one) all bright metal chemically blacked, paintwork on footplate edges sorted out etc. Not weathered yet though.

Problem is I've rather lost interest in the loco, mainly because its taken too long to finish and I've moved on to other projects.

Some self-discipline definitely needed.

 

For a loco that started active life in Tasmania, the distance from its Manchester birthplace to Charmouth is trivial. Looks a lovely model, and no doubt it runs like one, too.

Hi Ian,

 

Thanks very much.

It runs beautifully thanks to a Faulhaber motor with integral gearhead in each bogie, driving the axle through bevel gears (by North West Shortline?)

Its a Backwoods Miniatures kit by the way, I didnt scratchbuild it!

 

Cheers,

Dave.

Edited by DLT

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Is there a gradient high to low from left to right of phots 6,7 & 9 of post 1 and phot 1 of post 14 or is it an optical illusion? I ask because the effect (if i not my eyes) just looks terrific, very subtle. Just like the real thing.

Edited by DLT

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Is there a gradient high to low from left to right of phots 6,7 & 9 of post 1 and phot 1 of post 14 or is it an optical illusion? I ask because the effect (if i not my eyes) just looks terrific, very subtle. Just like the real thing.

Yes, there is a gradient. The line starts to climb between the loco shed and the starter signal. The gradient is 1 in 35 to gain enough height to cross the lane. It adds visual interest to the layout, and (I hope) gives the impression that the line is climbing into the hills.

I was inspired by the Welshpool and Llanfair, with its steep and very visible gradients, particularly the climb out of Raven Square.

Cheers,

Dave.

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Yes, there is a gradient. The line starts to climb between the loco shed and the starter signal. The gradient is 1 in 35 to gain enough height to cross the lane. It adds visual interest to the layout, and (I hope) gives the impression that the line is climbing into the hills.

I was inspired by the Welshpool and Llanfair, with its steep and very visible gradients, particularly the climb out of Raven Square.

Cheers,

Dave.

 

I like the effect a lot, great work!

 

P.S 1 in 35 is much steeper than I would have reckoned from the pictures, I guess you get a much better idea of the gradient seeing it for real rather than in 2-D..

Edited by jpnewbold

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HI Dave

Can i drive that monster of a loco ! Wow , can not wait to see this layout in the flesh !.

Keep the photo coming .

Darren

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Absolutely gorgeous! Went to Charmouth for part of our holiday this year. Pity the railway wasn't there!

Thanks Steve,

You would be suprised at the number of people I've met who were convinced that it WAS there.

I've even fooled myself; occasionally when passing on the A35 I find myself glancing up the valley hoping to spot a bit of the old embankment.

Then I have to say to myself, "Idiot, pull yourself together, you invented it! "

Cheers,

Dave.

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Hi Dave

I always like your models they are also fantastic and the quality is out of this world.

I am looking forward in see it at the Barnstaple model railway club exibition next year.

keep up the good work.

 

RAY70B

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The colour tones, the weathering and the general open spaciousness of it all; simply lovely and very convincing.

Steve.

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Yes, there is a gradient. The line starts to climb between the loco shed and the starter signal. The gradient is 1 in 35 to gain enough height to cross the lane. It adds visual interest to the layout, and (I hope) gives the impression that the line is climbing into the hills.

I was inspired by the Welshpool and Llanfair, with its steep and very visible gradients, particularly the climb out of Raven Square.

Cheers,

Dave.

 

Just tuned back into RMWeb after the Motherboard of all Meltdowns. Good to see pics of Charmouth, Dave, thank you! I have always admired your subtle modelling - upstairs there is a well-thumbed copy of the Toddler with your article on the left-hand extension which gives so much more to Charmouth than the few inches it adds in length.

 

As a some-time firebod, the gradients on the W&L are quite demanding. Seeing the water level zoom up and down the gauge glass as the loco goes over Coppice Lane is entertaining (if water is sufficient) or finger-biting (if not). The 1 in 50 off the platform end at Raven Sq is fine, it's the level when you reach Golfa Summit, 2 miles away and 300 ft higher, that's the true test. Rule of thumb with the Beyers is to leave with a full glass, topping up whenever pressure permits on the climb. Some firemen make it look effortless - my efforts were possibly not so accomplished.

 

To me a railway isn't a real railway unless it's got noticeable gradients, and some narrow gauge / light railways had them in spades. The rise to the level crossing on Charmouth is a subtle bit of realism along with lots of other little touches around both Charmouth and Bridport. Keep those pics coming!

 

Patrick

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Hello Patrick,

Thanks very much for your kind comments, much appreciated.

 

Just tuned back into RMWeb after the Motherboard of all Meltdowns. Good to see pics of Charmouth, Dave, thank you! I have always admired your subtle modelling - upstairs there is a well-thumbed copy of the Toddler with your article on the left-hand extension which gives so much more to Charmouth than the few inches it adds in length.

Ah yes, the six inch extension. Charmouth was originally built to squeeze onto the longest wall in my bedroom; quite constricting so the bufferstops were about half an inch from the baseboard end. Eventually exhibition extensions were built for each end but not used at home. I was amazed by the difference that adding that extra few inches made to the visual effect of the layout, quite out of proportion with the work involved.

For some reason Railway Modeller wouldn't use my preferred title "Six Inches Makes All The Difference", I cant think why...

 

As a some-time firebod, the gradients on the W&L are quite demanding. Seeing the water level zoom up and down the gauge glass as the loco goes over Coppice Lane is entertaining (if water is sufficient) or finger-biting (if not).

To me a railway isn't a real railway unless it's got noticeable gradients, and some narrow gauge / light railways had them in spades. The rise to the level crossing on Charmouth is a subtle bit of realism along with lots of other little touches around both Charmouth and Bridport. Keep those pics coming!

Thanks very much, my modelling has been strongly influenced by the W&L, particularly its level-crossings and very visible gradients. I was determined to try and incorporate these effects on the layout; Castle and Cyfronydd are two of my favourite locations

All the best,

Dave.

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Found a few more photos, taken around the level-crossing area and hopefully showing some of the Welshpool & Llanfair influence.

Had to remove buildings and backscene to get these views!

Cheers, Dave.

 

post-5825-0-23655600-1327010466.jpg

 

post-5825-0-71873800-1327010472.jpg

 

post-5825-0-69048500-1327010477.jpg

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Great shots Dave. After driving Dolgoch and four coaches to Brn-glas and back I concur about the gradients the regulator needed continual tweeeaking much more so than a layout controller. Mind you it was great fun.

Don

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I just love the natural colours. Totally realistic.

Agreed. The whole feel of those pictures is reminiscent of the Welshpool & Llanfair, with a thoroughly rural route in relatively unspectacular countryside, in contrast to the Talyllyn, & particularly the Festiniog & Welsh Highland, where mountains are always present. This has marvellous atmosphere.

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Hi Dave,

 

Really looking forward to operating Charmouth at the next exhibition - it's been a while!

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