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Project Builds, Detailing, Painting, Weathering

Pete Piszczek

From the Workbench (for everyone to contribute):

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...The main pipework is square styrene rod, re-shaped using water poured from a just-boiled kettle or three, then quickly cooled under a cold tap. It takes time to do, but the result pays off...

 

Brian

 

It certainly does. Any chance of a "how to" on the boiling water technique - I've seen it referred to but my efforts have always failed.

 

What I really don't follow is do you somehow form the shape cold (i.e by wrapping round a former?) and then use the boiling water to set the shape, in which case how do you get it to cold form without snapping or tearing? Or do you use the boiling water to soften before shaping, in which case how do you do it without getting sags and finger marks?

 

Confused of central Scotland...

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Dear "Confused of central Scotland",

 

Sorry that I can't be more specific, other than to say that the styrene will only become pliable enough, once it has the heat in it. You couldn't wrap it around a former, into the planned shape when cold, as it would snap. It would be possible to place the re-shaped styrene into a former when it has been bent, prior to immersing it in very cold water, in the hope that the new shape will be retained. It does take time and effort. Indeed, the lower curve of the solid square styrene did snap when I was attempting to bend it, so it isn't a full 90 degree curve like the top one. The "break" is hidden by the lowest "strapping" around it, and was repaired with styrene cement. Luckily, most of it will be buried, so a full 90 degree curve isn't as essential.

 

Best wishes,

 

Brian (born and raised in central Scotland, but lived for 28 years in Devon, England...)

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Thanks Brian,

 

I suspect, like most things, practice is the key.

 

Could I be really cheeky, and ask for a scan of the original Russell article? If that's OK, PM and I'll confirm email addy.

 

I did the opposite to you - I came to Scotland from Hampshire just over 18 years ago. Time flies!

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They are all "HO" ....but those couplers in the link are more correctly in scale with prototype couplers ie. 1/87th ...against No.5s for example which are larger than true 1/87th to be more "forgiving" when coupling on a layout to various brands and types of other couplers....

 

Regards Trevor ... :sungum:

 

I though Kadee was still calling the #58's "near scale". The only US true scale couplers I know of are made by a small outfit called "Sergent", but Kadee's won't couple with them. So it's a bit of a misnomer.

 

Ted

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There is a topic in this section by Tony S. of him detailing and weathering an MKT freight car. He details the adding of "Sergeant" couplers. it is a very interesting thread...

 

Best, Pete.

Edited by trisonic

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I though Kadee was still calling the #58's "near scale". The only US true scale couplers I know of are made by a small outfit called "Sergent", but Kadee's won't couple with them. So it's a bit of a misnomer.

 

Actually....Sergents will couple with Kadee's "scale" head couplers. I have a few sets of the Sergents and while they look really nice, they're just a bit too fiddly for me in operation...so I use them now in photographs of my cars because they DO look wonderful.

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Something I've been working on...

 

C&NW+46557+flat+car+8.png

 

More about this ongoing project on my blog, the link is below my signature line.

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I think that flat car weathering is very well done despite your own criticism, on your blog!

 

I do like the way you have picked out the detail on the top view. i must have a go at doing a weathering job on my flat car as all it has is a slight wash of dark brown over it.

 

Ian

Edited by roundhouse

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I'm always very critical of my own work, because it stops me from being complacent about improving. For instance, I have added another black wash over the floor, and will be replacing the incorrect round brake rod in due course, and not forgetting to add those cut levers. It all helps to keep me sharp.

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That is a really useful shot and it will be used as inspiration for wooden weathering. Thank you for posting it.

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Latest car finished and ready for grunge - a Sunshine Models kit of an Illinois Terminal 36' box car. Short thing, but somehow many of them survived until 1961!

 

post-751-0-67133800-1331421806_thumb.jpg

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Just finished weathering a Kadee PS-2 Covered Hopper.EJ&E+3310+covhop+8.png

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A comment I've been getting about my modeling is that I don't weather my stuff. Why? Because I've been afraid of messing 'em up. But after the January meet at Cocoa Beach, Florida where I spent a lot of time talking with Chip Syme about using Bragdon pigments, and watching Tony Thompson's clinic on weathering with acrylic washes I decided to have a go at it on some 'practice' cars. I'd be pleased to hear comments.

 

The first one is an early Sunshine kit I built a good 20 years ago. Weathered with only Bragdons

post-751-0-78619700-1332122591_thumb.jpg

 

Second is another old build, a Westerfield USRA car...a mix of light Bragdon powders applied over acrylic washes

post-751-0-22991700-1332122788_thumb.jpg

 

Third is some sort of unknown plastic car with truck mounted couplers and X2F couplers...again a mix of washes and powders

post-751-0-76507600-1332122879_thumb.jpg

Edited by CraigZ
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Subtle, Craig. I like the middle one best. If there is a trick to "weathering" then it is the fact of working from photos of the actual car at the time you are modelling. You read Tony's thread on the MKT concrete hopper?

 

Best, Pete.

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Subtle, Craig. I like the middle one best. If there is a trick to "weathering" then it is the fact of working from photos of the actual car at the time you are modelling. You read Tony's thread on the MKT concrete hopper?

 

Best, Pete.

 

Thanks...I've read dribs and drabs of Tony's thread. Now that you remind me I'll go back to it.

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Craig, You'll see that at the end he has a photo of the proto compared directly to a photo of the finished model.

 

Best, Pete.

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Tony's advantage there is that his car was around when color film was the norm, not the extreme exception :)

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True. I had forgotten your predilection for older stuff....

 

Best, Pete.

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A comment I've been getting about my modeling is that I don't weather my stuff. Why? Because I've been afraid of messing 'em up. But after the January meet at Cocoa Beach, Florida where I spent a lot of time talking with Chip Syme about using Bragdon pigments, and watching Tony Thompson's clinic on weathering with acrylic washes I decided to have a go at it on some 'practice' cars. I'd be pleased to hear comments.

 

Okay, first thing I would say is that three quarter views make it hard to judge your work. The second that your lighting is not doing the work any justice. The latter is difficult to set up though, if you don't have lights.

 

The first one is an early Sunshine kit I built a good 20 years ago. Weathered with only Bragdons

post-751-0-78619700-1332122591_thumb.jpg

 

This looks promising, but feels a little flat to me.

 

Second is another old build, a Westerfield USRA car...a mix of light Bragdon powders applied over acrylic washes

post-751-0-22991700-1332122788_thumb.jpg

 

This has more pop, feels less flat and works for me. I might be inclined to run a dark wash into the plank lines though.

 

Third is some sort of unknown plastic car with truck mounted couplers and X2F couplers...again a mix of washes and powders

post-751-0-76507600-1332122879_thumb.jpg

 

This doesn't work for me, but that might just be the model, not your work.

 

My only advice is to face the fear of making a mess and see weathering as an opportunity to be creative.

 

I hope this very small feedback has been of some help.? Keep up the good work, and if we get chance to meet at a show I'll happily jaw on about weathering mistakes I've made.

 

All the best A

 

Ashley

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Okay, first thing I would say is that three quarter views make it hard to judge your work. The second that your lighting is not doing the work any justice. The latter is difficult to set up though, if you don't have lights.

 

 

 

This looks promising, but feels a little flat to me.

 

 

 

This has more pop, feels less flat and works for me. I might be inclined to run a dark wash into the plank lines though.

 

 

 

This doesn't work for me, but that might just be the model, not your work.

 

My only advice is to face the fear of making a mess and see weathering as an opportunity to be creative.

 

I hope this very small feedback has been of some help.? Keep up the good work, and if we get chance to meet at a show I'll happily jaw on about weathering mistakes I've made.

 

All the best A

 

Ashley

 

Thanks for the feedback, Ashley. No lights here, so it's a tripod, a Nikkor micro lens and long exposures.

 

I'm not on for any trips to the UK anytime soon so not likely to make any shows there :) though in the past I've made it to EM Expo a couple of times and the Scaleforum as well. I like to suggest to my UK friends that they ought to come over to Florida the first weekend in January for Prototype Rails. Great modeling, great clinics, and it's in Florida in January right on the ocean in the Cocoa Beach Hilton. Hard to beat...plus it's about 90 minutes to Orlando to keep the rest of the family occupied. I'm mucking up a chrome yellow MKT single sheathed car right now...the washes have really made the boards pop on it.

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A comment I've been getting about my modeling is that I don't weather my stuff. Why? Because I've been afraid of messing 'em up. But after the January meet at Cocoa Beach, Florida where I spent a lot of time talking with Chip Syme about using Bragdon pigments, and watching Tony Thompson's clinic on weathering with acrylic washes I decided to have a go at it on some 'practice' cars. I'd be pleased to hear comments.

 

Fine first practice. None of these would look out of place in a train of my weathered freight cars. :good:

 

I don't care for powders personally, I find them hard to use. Give me enamels or acrylics and a box of cotton buds. I'm firmly in the "drench the side with a wash and clean it off with cotton buds" camp of weathering. The crap settles in the nooks and crannies, and gets scrubbed off the open areas.

 

Micheal's sells poster board in different colors, their black is a charcoal grey color. I've found that photographing models with a darker neutral background tends to make it easier to see the weathering. Photographing weathering is harder than the actual weathering...

 

What stands out to me when I've see your previous most excellent freight car builds, isn't that the cars are not weathered, so much as the wheel sets and trucks aren't. Painting the wheel's steel rims a nice track color and browning the trucks a bit really makes a huge difference, even if you don't touch the car body.

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Thanks for the feedback, Ashley. No lights here, so it's a tripod, a Nikkor micro lens and long exposures.

 

I'm not on for any trips to the UK anytime soon so not likely to make any shows there :) though in the past I've made it to EM Expo a couple of times and the Scaleforum as well. I like to suggest to my UK friends that they ought to come over to Florida the first weekend in January for Prototype Rails. Great modeling, great clinics, and it's in Florida in January right on the ocean in the Cocoa Beach Hilton. Hard to beat...plus it's about 90 minutes to Orlando to keep the rest of the family occupied. I'm mucking up a chrome yellow MKT single sheathed car right now...the washes have really made the boards pop on it.

 

Tripod is definitely the way to go.

 

If you are over for a Scaleforum let me know, as it is one of my favourite shows.

 

Remind me of the `Prototype Rails again, closer to the time, if you wouldn't mind. If I still have a job etc. then I'd like to try and get over.

 

Ashley

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Oh yeah, here is a weathering job gone wrong:

 

N&W+44324+box+car+12b.png

 

More on my blog of course.

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