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Blue Peter

a1 partwork Flying Scotsman

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Just a suggestion for the poster who wants to use automobile paints, I know the advantages, especially with cellulose which is quick drying and very hard wearing. Why not buy a tin of railmatch apply some to a surface and go to a local automobile paint mixer where they should be able to get it close enough, I have done this myself in previous years. As I said earlier, paint shade is transient especialy on something as potentially filthy as a steam locomotive, the state of which could vary on a day to day basis.

 

 

A couple of things to bear in mind with this approach:

 

Cellulose is frowned upon by the environmental lobby, and is not as easily available as it used to be. It has been banned for use in the automotive trade, but is still available from some outlets for other uses.

 

Car paints are made with pigments that perform well under daylight. I sprayed a 5" gauge loco in a close match to Doncaster green. Outside, on the track it looks excellent. When it is displayed indoors under flourescent tubes, it takes on a lurid yellow colour. This was just about OK for a model that spent much of it's life outside, but is not ideal for one that is intended for use indoors. If you do go down this route, do some test sprays and check how it looks under a variety of artificial lights before committing yourself.

 

I wholehartedly agree regarding the variation in colour between locomotives. Pale blue and pale green are particularly poor at fading. Those who have seen any touchup work on Northern Rock on the R&ER (pale green) will have noticed quite how quickly that can fade in the sun. I understand the main reason against Caledonian blue as a BR express livery was lack of fade resistance.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Simon.

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Yes, I know about cellulose, I simply offered the thought, around here you get paint mixed and put into an aerosol (UK Tyne & Wear). I use acrylic these days but I find the drying time urksome.

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Just a suggestion for the poster who wants to use automobile paints, I know the advantages, especially with cellulose which is quick drying and very hard wearing. Why not buy a tin of railmatch apply some to a surface and go to a local automobile paint mixer where they should be able to get it close enough, I have done this myself in previous years. As I said earlier, paint shade is transient especialy on something as potentially filthy as a steam locomotive, the state of which could vary on a day to day basis.

 

I think the poster you are referring to lives in Australia, in which case buying a tin of Railmatch is not an option. It is not sold here, and that applies to many types of paint due to the inability to ship paint by anything other than surface transport these days.

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:unsure: Can anyone tell me ,what type of varnish,ie,gloss,satin or matt,for finishing after the painting?

Ive used Railmatch Enamel paint.----ROB :scratch_one-s_head_mini:

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Hi all,

Here is the reply gfrom NRM, this sheds a bit more light on things;

 

 

Thank you for your enquiry. We often get asked about BS or RAL paint codes and unfortunately there are no exact corresponding codes to old descriptions such as LNER Apple Green. When the engines were originally painted the colours were subject to some variation as paint was normally mixed from pigments on the day rather than supplied pre-mixed from a factory. Depending on which works was responsible for painting, Doncaster and Darlington produced notable differences in their interpretation of Apple Green. When the new build 'Tornado' locomotive was painted here at the NRM the colour was reproduced by matching a sample provided by the museum, which is actually not quite the same as the British Standard colour of the same name.

 

I recently contacted our paint supplier, Williamson’s of Ripon, regarding these codes and they say:

 

 

“You face the same dilemma as we do on this topic! Most of the 'heritage' colours do not cross reference exactly to BS or RAL numbers.

 

 

The only thing I can suggest if you are able to find out the correct livery colour is for them to ring & ask us if we recognise it. We have a huge database of listed colours but have no idea on which livery they were used. Another problem is that paint names are totally unreliable for ensuring the correct colour.â€

 

 

Some books we hold that may be of some help are:

 

http://libcatalogue.york.ac.uk:80/F/?func=direct&doc_number=001393054

 

 

http://libcatalogue.york.ac.uk:80/F/?func=direct&doc_number=001393033

 

 

 

Carter’s book has a useful Paint Colour Chart which Haresnape uses the references in his book and he states that “it is quite unsurpassed as a reference work.†He also goes on to explain how there can be variations in shade as each batch of paint ordered could vary slightly (perhaps emanating form different manufacturers) and the constituents of the paint could also vary. For example some pigments produced from chemical or vegetable dyes can fade quickly if exposed to sunlight. Others perhaps with oxide as a constituent can darken. I have attached some information on liveries for the A1/A3 classes, taken from the RCTS series ‘Locomotives of the LNER’, which explains when engines were repainted.

 

I'm sorry we can't be of more help but I hope the above information will be of some use.

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

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:unsure: Can anyone tell me ,what type of varnish,ie,gloss,satin or matt,for finishing after the painting?

Ive used Railmatch Enamel paint.----ROB :scratch_one-s_head_mini:

Hi Rob,

Railmatch do a satin varnish in an aerosol. This is ideal as it is a nice (almost) shine without giving the 'toy train' look.

Regards Mike

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Oh dear, the Rat is in strife again!

 

Still struggling along here, doing bits and pieces in what I think is a more logical order. I am about to cut back the front bogie wheel arches so I can fit the splashers, have had a look at the instructions in issue 68 or whatever, where it says to take 1mm off the arches.

 

Only one small problem, in the magazine photo, the "blue man" has his great mit over the back section of the rear wheel arch, so I cant tell whether I am supposed to follow the curve right back, or to gradually taper it down to the edge at some point.

 

It seems to me that if you followed the curve right back it may not be right, and the sand boxes would be too close to the edge.

 

Would I be better to build the front bogie and fit it first?

 

Totally bogged down in this little detail!huh.gif

 

Would really like to know what everyone else has done, there was a photo posted some time back, with measurements drawn on it, not sure if it was on the old forum or where it was, I have trawled through that, also the other forum and this one and cant find it anywhere.

 

Can anyone help or tell me exactly where it was posted if you can remember please?

 

Thanks

 

Bushrat

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Would I be better to build the front bogie and fit it first?

 

Yes. Then you can judge just how much you need to take off.

 

There's a couple of pictures showing what I filed off my in my build thread. Linky (scroll down a few pics)

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Yes. Then you can judge just how much you need to take off.

 

There's a couple of pictures showing what I filed off my in my build thread. Linky (scroll down a few pics)

 

 

Yep, thats good, I will build the bodgie, er, I mean bogie first, and follow your pics. Yours is looking quite good!

 

Thanks for the help,

 

Bushrat

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Yep, thats good, I will build the bodgie, er, I mean bogie first, and follow your pics. Yours is looking quite good!

 

Thanks for the help,

 

Bushrat

 

 

 

Yes, well, the bogie.......................... All going swimmingly until I broke a grab iron and had to fix it, much fiddling later,

"Phew thought the Rat, the worst is over!" WRONG!

I have just spent the last two hours trying to devise a method of soldering the 2 front mudguards on, there is just no way I can find to hold them in place as they are at right angles to the bogie body with no side support. Therefore, no way to clamp them in place.

 

In desperation, I tried a couple of dabs of super glue thinking that might hold them in place until I solder.

 

Naaah! Fell straight off, thats five different brands of super glue I have tried on the brass on this kit, it just wont bond, thankfully I made the hard decision to solder at the beginning, but it is not without challenges.

 

As one who has built a great many kits of all descriptions over the last 55 years, this is the worst designed thing I have ever seen, a simple right angle added to this part would have made it so simple. The only thing I can think of is to araldite a bit of scrap onto these guards so they have some side support to hold them in place and get it off later.

 

Have any of you guys had a similar problem with these?

 

If theres a better way of doing it I would really like to know.............sad.gif

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I have just spent the last two hours trying to devise a method of soldering the 2 front mudguards on, there is just no way I can find to hold them in place as they are at right angles to the bogie body with no side support. Therefore, no way to clamp them in place.

I'm not sure I understand. There's an etched slot in the splashers that locates it onto the frame. Just wedge the splasher against the frame with your favourite clothes peg and solder it on.

 

The only problem I had there was catching the whitemetal sand box with the soldering iron :angry:

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Aye Bushrat,

I did mine,put the groove of the mud-guard into the frame,centralise it and solder,did for me.---ROB :D

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I'm not sure I understand. There's an etched slot in the splashers that locates it onto the frame. Just wedge the splasher against the frame with your favourite clothes peg and solder it on.

 

The only problem I had there was catching the whitemetal sand box with the soldering iron angry.gif

 

 

Sorry guys, didnt explain that very well did I!

 

I am talking about the front splash guards on the bogie frame itself, not the chassis splashersohmy.gif

 

I mean the ones that are etched on the back and we have to punch the rivets, anyhow, I soldered a short tab onto them, then onto the bogie base, held that with an allidile, crocogator, arrgh! ALLIGATOR clip, and soldered away!

 

Bits as shown below in "borrowed" photo!

 

A truly horrible job, took me 5 hours to do the thing, and I am only about 60% happy with it, hopefully some paint will cover my blunders.................wink.gif

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Hi All

Not posted before but have been watching this forum. I am neither expert or novice but it is over thirty years since I last built an etched kit in 00 scale, may I first of all thank everyone who has given expert help on this forum - I may not have followed it all but it has certainly helped.

 

Attached (hopefully) are some photos of my completed effort. It is soldered whereever possible but otherwise follows fairly closely the magazine instructions. One of the biggest problems I had was with the lining decals, all the red lining is actually done by hand with a brushand the tender lining is not very straight. I have motorised with the Hachette supplied motor but it is unlikely to run on a layout - it is a trifle too big for mine (Z gauge).

 

On the whole I am pleased with the outcome and have thoroughly enjoyed the build, I am now looking for a GWR Castle to build in 00 gauge.

 

Zgauger

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Hey Bushrat,Now I know what you mean, I must have been lucky,never had any problem with them ---ROB

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Hey Bushrat,Now I know what you mean, I must have been lucky,never had any problem with them ---ROB

 

Yes, and I still can't understand why! For the second one that I am partly scratchbuilding, I will redesign the front bogie so that it is a one piece foldout design with all the rivet detail etched.

 

I cant for the life of me understand why they didnt do it this way at the outset, instead of this dumb and innacurate rivet punching from behind!

 

I assembled the bogie onto the chassis, and what I found interesting is that on mine it seems that the bogie is too far forward! I am beginning to think that the problem didnt lie with the chassis wheel arches at all, rather that the locating hole for the bogie mounting pin is too far forward.

 

I will take some photos and post them tomorrow if I get a chance.

 

Bushrat

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To Zgauger.

 

Well done, looks very impressive.

I will be more thsn happy if mine looks as good when completed.

 

 

To Bushrat

 

I also had the same problem and had to re-jig the hole for the pin to compensate. I thought it was down to bad workmanship on my part but now I am not so sure.

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Hi All,

I'm off to YORK this week,guess where I'll be visiting?-----YES,the AIRCRAFT museum??-- :lol: -----ROB

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To Zgauger.

 

Well done, looks very impressive.

I will be more thsn happy if mine looks as good when completed.

 

 

To Bushrat

 

I also had the same problem and had to re-jig the hole for the pin to compensate. I thought it was down to bad workmanship on my part but now I am not so sure.

 

 

Calsash:

 

Yes it seems a bit odd, but being so far behind you guys, I just hadnt got to it.

 

The photos in the instructions are taken from angles that dont really lend themselves to seeing how it should really fit.

 

Did you have to take any metal off to fit the splashers after you re-jigged?

 

To Zguager - your model looks very good!

 

Bushrat

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QUOTE:-

 

Calsash:

 

Yes it seems a bit odd, but being so far behind you guys, I just hadnt got to it.

 

The photos in the instructions are taken from angles that dont really lend themselves to seeing how it should really fit.

 

Did you have to take any metal off to fit the splashers after you re-jigged?

 

To Zguager - your model looks very good!

 

Bushrat

 

 

 

Yes,

I still needed to use my dremel to remove a little more metal.

Cheers Calsash.

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QUOTE:-

 

Calsash:

 

Yes it seems a bit odd, but being so far behind you guys, I just hadnt got to it.

 

The photos in the instructions are taken from angles that dont really lend themselves to seeing how it should really fit.

 

Did you have to take any metal off to fit the splashers after you re-jigged?

 

To Zguager - your model looks very good!

 

Bushrat

 

 

 

Yes,

I still needed to use my dremel to remove a little more metal.

Cheers Calsash.

 

 

 

Ok, Photos as promised.

 

First Photo; shows where the wheels on the front bogie are on my build. I am thinking I will take metal off from the top of the arch forward. I really dont want to re-jig the hole, as I think that there would be a problem with clearance for sand boxes and valve gear. Wot do you reckon?

 

 

Second Photo; is my partly scratchbuilt second loco (below) and original at top. The only original kit parts on this are the Cab, Footplate, and Boiler. Chassis, springs and tender body are home etched brass. Castings were done using type metal in two part silicone.

 

Third Photo; scratch built tender no 2, with both my wheels and some from the partworks that I got hold of as extras.

 

If anyone is wondering why I am so far behind it is because (apart from 6 months off with a bung shoulder) I have been teaching myself the genteel arts of photo etching and metal casting - with a limited amount of success - but never mind it's all good fun!

 

unsure.gif blink.gif tongue.gif laugh.gif !

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Here is the re-designed front bogie ready for etching (its in the tank now)!

 

What I have done is to start from scratch and draw the artwork so that there is only one part, which means that there is no laminating needed as we have had to do with the original.

 

Also, the front splash guards are attached to the bogie frame, so that once bent into place, they can be easily soldered without having to resort to clamps etc.

 

This will make the bogie just a tad narrower than what we were supplied, but I think this will be easily adjusted by packing out the bushes a little.

 

Will post potos of the finished item if it works ok.smile.gif

 

Bushrat

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Hey Bushey

 

Use your own 14ba nuts and bolts you check on the ones they give you and they are different means you

have to drill out bigger holes, Also they ask you to tap out a 12ba tap, if their 12ba is anything like their 14ba screws

no wonder that will strip easy, Also if you havent done it change the main drive wheel bolts and throw theirs away

mines a non runner so nothing going to move or maybe its just me..

 

regards

 

Ted..

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