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Installed on the Thameslink line of route, and all controlled signals in the resignalled area, is the innovative ‘Proceed on Sight’ aspect known as the POSA signal. In the event of a track circuit failure, the signaller may over-ride this by selecting a POSA route, which displays two flashing white lights at 45º to the driver who may proceed cautiously, thereby obviating the delay incurred in stopping at a red signal and contacting the box for permission to proceed.

Thought this was rather interesting from the article.

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Thought this was rather interesting from the article.

 

Been in use through the Thameslink core for over a year now and proved to be useful in minimising delays. As such NR are looking to introduce them more widely although to be pedantic a POSA is actually no different to a bog standard shunt signal in terms of how a driver should proceed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Earlier in this topic thread, I've posted some time-lapse videos put on YouTube by a certain chap at regular intervals, showing progress on the Tooley St. side of the site.

Following a long pause over the summer months, the same chap is now posting his time-lapse videos again.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Ron Ron Ron
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Was at London Bridge on Saturday afternoon (along with a lot of Charlton and Wimbledon football supporters.....).

Apart from the terminal platforms, there was only one through platform in use in each direction, which gave the station a strange feel. Lots of

Class 66s down the line towards New Cross on engineering trains.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Most of the signalling equipment appears to have been installed now between London Bridge and Blackfriars plus the conductor rails installed and connected up. Most mornings I see installation teams working on the Eastern approaches to London Bridge as far out as New Cross.

 

With the big Christmas blockade coming up it does look like everything is coming together.

 

Regards,

 

Dan

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What was the extra that had to be carried out on some oof the buildings after they were finnished I read tis in an article somewhere recently/

 

I think it was things like the last of the shop units in the concourse IIRC.

 

Jamie

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

 

Much of this is a considerable improvement on the old East side jumble, but I do wish the architect had specified something a little better than the plain brickwork elevation, even if just broken up by a single, outstanding ridge to follow the old Victorian contour.

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Much of this is a considerable improvement on the old East side jumble, but I do wish the architect had specified something a little better than the plain brickwork elevation, even if just broken up by a single, outstanding ridge to follow the old Victorian contour.

Oddly, the new brickwork has been broken up by having some bricks slightly proud of the general surface.

 37655066315_4591d120b8_h.jpgLondon Bridge Station by David Harvey, on Flickr

The amount is a maximum nearest the ends, and the centre section has all flush bricks. I also think that continuing the existing band would have been better, but perhaps the heights differ at each end. Even just fading the bands flush would have looked better, I think

 

Thanks

 

Dave

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Oddly, the new brickwork has been broken up by having some bricks slightly proud of the general surface.

 37655066315_4591d120b8_h.jpgLondon Bridge Station by David Harvey, on Flickr

The amount is a maximum nearest the ends, and the centre section has all flush bricks. I also think that continuing the existing band would have been better, but perhaps the heights differ at each end. Even just fading the bands flush would have looked better, I think

 

Thanks

 

Dave

There is probably some sort of planning condition that the new brickwork must be easily distinguished from the old. That is now quite a common condition where additions to historic buildings are permitted.

 

Jamie

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There is probably some sort of planning condition that the new brickwork must be easily distinguished from the old. That is now quite a common condition where additions to historic buildings are permitted.Jamie

Nonetheless it does look awfully like an architect's attempt at creating a decorative(?) feature.

 

Jim

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