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First Attempt at Handbuilt Track - A complete novice’s experience.


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Shouldn't there be cuts in the rails that form the V between bearers 1.X8 and 1.E1?

Hi Budgie.

Yes, if this was to be used as part of a layout. But, as this is my first attempt, it's just a test piece and will probably end up in the scrap bin so I didn't bother.

 

Ray.

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Hi Pete.

Is this what you mean? Not easy to get any depth of focus artificial light.

 

toe.jpg

 

Ray.

 

I find looking at it like that makes it easier to spot anything amiss - it looks pretty good to me.

 

Use the Dremel to cut the rails - a triangular needle file is fine for copperclad.

 

Best, Pete.

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Guest jim s-w

 

Any advice for cutting the copperclad between the rails, I was thinking of using a dremmel with a disc cutter!

 

Ray.

 

Hi Ray

 

Thats what I use. The trick is to hold it parrallel to the sleeper and not at a right angle to it. Be gentle and you can grind away the copper clad in a gentle groove meaning you dont have a harsh cut line to try and hide.

 

Looks great so far

 

Cheers

 

Jim

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Hi Ray

 

Thats what I use. The trick is to hold it parrallel to the sleeper and not at a right angle to it. Be gentle and you can grind away the copper clad in a gentle groove meaning you dont have a harsh cut line to try and hide.

 

Looks great so far

 

Cheers

 

Jim

Hi Jim.

Is this what you mean?

post-11105-0-37862300-1324222021.jpg

 

Ray.

Edited by tender
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I use a slitting disc without problem, but make the cut next to the sleeper nearest the operator. From a side on perspective you won't see it as it is hidden by the rail itself and end on it is less noticable as you eye is drawn to the rails and not a series of cuts right down the centre of the sleepers.

 

Of course if you are really particular and have the time and inclination you can fill all the small slots or follow JSW's method...

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I found Jim's idea of slotting the PCB using a dremmel with a cutting disc a little aggressive, so I used a cone shaped grinder that came with the demmel set. As the gaps are 'bevelled in' I'm hoping they won't show too much once painted/weathered.

 

post-11105-0-11477900-1324221836.jpg

 

Setting up for DCC was easy as shown in the picture, just cut the PCB sleepers from the toe end up to breaks for the wing rails and from the wing rail out along each leg. The Vee will also need a break in the rail from the rest of the layout (not shown). Supply DCC power to the toe end and a switched feed to the vee crossing depending on the route (from curved rail if straight, from straight rail if turnout).

 

Ray.

 

PS. It looks like the admin boys at work are playing with the server where my pictures are stored so apologies if they keep disappearing.

Edited by tender
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Could you just post the pictures directly to rmweb rather than trying to link them in? Its taking a while for them all to time out at the moment..

 

I'd agree with you on using one of those cone shaped grinding things (Normally pink or green) as i've done the same though manually file sometimes too.

 

You've obviously grasped the wiring nice and easy too

Edited by craigwelsh
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Could you just post the pictures directly to rmweb rather than trying to link them in? Its taking a while for them all to time out at the moment..

 

Hi Craig, I didn't realise that was an option, can you explain how to?

 

Scratch that , just found the guide.

I've uploaded all the pictures to RMWeb now.

Edited by tender
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Hi Craig, I didn't realise that was an option, can you explain how to?

Click 'More Reply Options' button and you;ll get a box to add attachments to your posts. Obviously compress the jpgs quality a bit for web so they end up about 500kb or less if you can.

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Wired up the turnout to my DCC setup and tried a few locos and stock.

All my Hornby RTR stuff I've tried so far runs through very smoothly. A Bachmann 'N class' runs through Ok but is a little tight through the knuckle of the crossover. My Dapol Beetie Well Tank not so good, it tries to climb out of the knuckle.

Here's a really bad video, (shot with the light of a table lamp).

 

 

If you look carefully you can see the BWT do a little jiggle as it goes through the crossing.

I've checked the Back to Backs with a DOGA 00 B2B gauge and it's a nice tight fit in all the Hornby stuff. The Bachman N Class is a bit loose on two of the driving wheels, and the BWT can only be described as sloppy. This leads me to think that the problem lies with the BWT rather than the pointwork.

 

Ray.

Edited by tender
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I think the end results are excellent and a credit to your decision to have a go.

Templot was also a very wise choice as you now have a lifetimes supply of track templates in all gauges (no connection other than a satisfied user) although I must get round to transferring my copy to the new PC.

 

I also believe it should serve as an excellent example to all those who constantly moan about RTR track appearance that making your own is not difficult, a bit time consuming I accept, but very satisfying when finished and like all other modelling tasks, the more you do the better you get.

 

Regards

Stewart

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On 19/12/2011 at 12:38, tender said:
A Bachmann 'N class' runs through Ok but is a little tight through the knuckle of the crossover. My Dapol Beetie Well Tank not so good, it tries to climb out of the knuckle.

Hi Ray,

 

A common beginner mistake is to make the knuckle bend too sharp and/or the knuckle gap too tight. Here's a diagram which may help when setting the wing rail knuckles:

 

2_220535_490000000.png

 

The blue infill shows the theoretical ideal with a sharp bend at K exactly matching the angle of the vee and in line with it. In practice on the prototype it is not possible to make such a sharp bend because of the 1:20 inclination of the rails.

 

Instead, a short curve is used, as shown by the green line, making the knuckle gap wider than the flangeway gap. It works fine, and can help if replicated on the model. Some companies made this curve quite gentle and obvious as shown -- the NER for example. On the GWR the curve matches the crossing angle in feet, so for example a 1:7 crossing has the knuckle bend curved at 7ft radius.

 

More about knuckle bends: http://templot.com/companion/knuckle_radius.php

 

But it's important to get the flangeway gap correct alongside the nose of the vee at X in the diagram, otherwise there is a risk of wheels dropping into the gap in front of it.

 

What you must not do is make the knuckle bend too sharp, as shown by the red line. This is guaranteed to cause problems.

 

More in this topic: http://www.rmweb.co....post__p__447327

 

A way to make knuckle bends:

 

2_041828_140000000.png

 

regards,

 

Martin.

Edited by martin_wynne
2nd diagram added
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  • 3 weeks later...

Finally got around to finishing off the tie bar.

Of all the suggestions I came across (thanks for those) I decided to use the lace pin idea as it doesn't appear to put any stress on the solder joint whilst being fairly simple to implement.

Here's a few pictures.

 

First a 20p was used to set the gap for marking the holes in the tie bar.

 

post-11105-0-86038600-1325802187.jpg

 

These were drilled to 0.8mm and 0.7mm brass 'lace' pins inserted (after removing some of the copper from the PCB for insulation)

 

post-11105-0-36596600-1325802206.jpg

 

post-11105-0-78683600-1325802229.jpg

 

They were then bent over at 90 degrees

 

post-11105-0-00284700-1325802243.jpg

 

The length cut down and soldered in position.

 

post-11105-0-37049600-1325802260.jpg

 

Well, it works, and you can see pins rotate very slightly as the switch is moved across so I guess It's worthwhile doing something like this to remove the stress on the joint.

Just need to cut the tie bar down to length, drill a hole for the Cobalt motor and give it a final test.

 

I'm not overly sure about the appearance of this solution so might do a bit more thinking on this for the next turnout.

 

Ray.

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Ray, that's a very neat solution. Can you let me know the supplier of the 0.7mm brass pins? I'd like to try your method on ET.

 

Edit: It's OK Ray, my wife knows where to get them locally.

Edited by gordon s
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Hi Gordon.

I got them from Claires Lace (www.claireslace.co.uk). I used the 0.7mm brass Flanders pin but I think they do a 0.5mm pin which might be more suitable. The 0.7mm pin is a bit on the thick side, I had to file it down a bit after soldering as the wheel rim was just catching it.

 

Ray.

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  • 1 month later...

Any progress since? I've also started having a go at hand built track but in P4, haven't got to do a turnout yet though! Am rather worried I'll make a boob of it to be honest, straight sections using wood sleepers, plastic functional chairs and rail have been easy enough to build though.

 

I'm popping around looking for others who are just starting hand built track (any gauge) and reading up. Good uck with what you are doing and if you have made some progress please post it.

 

Regards,

 

Knux

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Any progress since? I've also started having a go at hand built track but in P4, haven't got to do a turnout yet though! Am rather worried I'll make a boob of it to be honest, straight sections using wood sleepers, plastic functional chairs and rail have been easy enough to build though.

 

I'm popping around looking for others who are just starting hand built track (any gauge) and reading up. Good uck with what you are doing and if you have made some progress please post it.

 

Regards,

 

Knux

 

Knux

 

Build your first P4 turnout in copperclad construction first, even if it only gets used on the workbench to test stock.

 

The build method is similar, but it is far easier to adjust / tweak soldered joints. In my opinion a much easier learning curve and much cheaper if you make a total mess up 1st or 2nd time round as some do.

 

In the previous RMwebs I did a couple of threads on building both copperclad and chaired turnouts of various types, might be worth a search, also this thread http://www.rmweb.co....-rivet-turnout/ on ply and rivet, though I find sticking chairs direct to plastic / ply sleepers much easier.

 

Good luck

Edited by hayfield
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  • 1 month later...

Any progress since?

Regards,

 

Knux

Hi Knux.

Progress as far as track building has come to a virtual standstill. I'm currently playing around with Templot on a complete layout before going any further so i don't end up making turnouts i don't need.

Will update again as soon as i start building again.

Ray.

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  • 1 month later...

Wow... Ray

 

You can do all the Track work to... Man... I'm under presure to do the same... haha, Yes right Peco Code 75 Track and Points for my Layout as and when that happens...

 

Jamie

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Hi Jamie.

I didn't find a simple turnout that difficult, just a methodical approach, advice from RMwebbers, a little time and patience and the right tools for the job is all you need.

Having said that I've yet to tackle double slip!!!!

 

Ray.

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Very impressive work Ray. I like the video - I couldn't see any problems. Martin, I think the wing rail thing is probably where most folk go wrong - I know I've had that problem. It usually becomes apparent after the thing has been laid. I have found that passing a flat file through the flangeway will fix it. I did build a double slip in code 100 - actually works too. Do I get a prize? I credit Trax 2 for my success, I got a decent template from the program and the book has pretty clear instructions. I like the lace pin idea but my problem was getting the holes at the right spacing. Oddly enough last time I was on Eileen's, I couldn't find lace pins. Thanks for the link.

 

Making one's own points is part of the progression through the hobby - it opens up so many possibilities.

 

John

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 months later...

Why use expensive lace pins when .7 brass wire from eileens (other sizes and suppliers may exist) does just as good a job, bend over one end, cut to size, solder to rail, jobs a good un

 

just saying.....

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