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Knightwing - 0-4-0 Industrial Shunter


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Yes.

I used a 35mm wheelbase Spud, if I was doing it again I'd use a Black Beetle.

 

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The baseplate cutout was filled with plasticard, drilled for the spud's mounting boss. The body just rests on the bogie.

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I've never seen that Metro Models collar before, or their website, thanks for pointing it out. However, the collar only seems to be available for the 26mm wheelbase Spud rather than the 35mm w/b one that I used.

 

I've built a few kits that use Spuds, the usual method is for a hole to be provided for the mounting boss to locate in. Then the spud can either be screwed in place, which means that the screw needs to be accessable from above, not always possible, or left loose with maybe a blob of blu-tack so stop it moving.

 

My Knightwing kit was built in 2008 and was the first loco that I built after a lengthy break from 'serious' modelling. It was also the first loco that I painted with a newly aquired airbrush. Livery is freelance, Tamiya Flat Green with wasp striped buffer beams.

The kit is based on a German loco, a Jung RK20B, a strange choice as these have never run over here.

 

Another loco worth looking at if your after a small industrial is the Roxey Mouldings 'Howard', whitemetal body on a Spud.

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  • 4 months later...

I've wondered in the past if there's enough room in the body of this Knightwing loco to fit the High Level Flyshunter chassis? I think the wheelbase is ok at 36mm but it could be that the width of the motor is too wide for the body of the loco.

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The overall width of the bonnet is 19.8mm, I'm not sure how thick the bonnet side mouldings are though. If they're not too thick then it should be possible to use a Flyshunter, if you do then please start a thread!

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  • 2 months later...
  • 11 months later...

Here's my "homebrew" take on a chassis for the Knightwing diesel shunter (Jung RK20)...

 

post-17585-0-18027900-1376046038_thumb.jpg

 

The sideframes are 1.66mm aluminium sheet with brass spacers and shouldered brass bearings for 0.125" axles.    These spacers were filed down a little to allow for the thickness of the ali sheet in the final wheel back-to-back measurement.   The running gear is mostly from the spares bin - Hornby gears, and Airfix wheels!   Not necessarily one for the purists but it all runs fine.     The wheel power pickups will be hidden by the loco's frames, allowing them to be mounted on 2mm plasticard insulators outside the chassis frames.    The Araldite Rapid fixing looks a bit primitive but is a simple secure solution as it penetrates holes drilled into the plasticard behind the pickup strips at the mounting point. 

 

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The flywheel takes a bit of room in the cab but not very much, and will prove essential when this loco operates at a smooth "walking" pace with its amber roof lamp flashing.

 

The RK20 body will also house a non-DCC circuit board in the engine bay above the motor.   This will provide a 5v onboard power supply for directional LED lights, and for a flashing roof lamp, using 7805 regulators and a bistable signal relay to switch/retain supply polarity to the roof LED when the loco changes direction.   The advantage of using 5 volts onboard is that running lights can reach near-full brightness at very slow speeds.   The 7805's then keep the voltage constant at faster speeds when track voltage exceeds 5v. 

Edited by wcrpaul
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  • 2 weeks later...

I was unsure whether to continue this thread or start anew.  Anyway, these are my onboard non-DCC circuit cards "tailored" for the Jung chassis

 

post-17585-0-32701400-1376916741.jpg

 

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The left hand card fits in the engine compartment and uses 7805s for regulated low voltage supplies to the directional running lights, whilst the smaller card uses a bistable relay to flip the supply to the roof amber flashing LED when the loco changes direction.    The parallel 1K resistors limit the variable voltage from track across the relay coil to 5v max.   This relay is spec'd to flip at +/-3.75 volts, but (usefully) is actually changing over at around 2.7 volts under test.  The diode is just a precaution against reverse voltages across the LED.

 

Both cards in position on the chassis...  

 

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The small relay card will take some cab space but much of it tucks under the line of the driver's control panel.   The engine compartment top body panel will be lined with ali foil to dissipate any hotspots from the 7805s.   The front running light clusters have now been wired to a small vero "distribution" card at the front of the chassis to ease later connection.

 

 

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I was unsure whether to continue this thread or start anew.  Anyway, these are my onboard non-DCC circuit cards "tailored" for the Jung chassis

 

attachicon.gifJung card 1.JPG

 

attachicon.gifJung card 2.JPG

 

The left hand card fits in the engine compartment and uses 7805s for regulated low voltage supplies to the directional running lights, whilst the smaller card uses a bistable relay to flip the supply to the roof amber flashing LED when the loco changes direction.    The parallel 1K resistors limit the variable voltage from track across the relay coil to 5v max.   This relay is spec'd to flip at +/-3.75 volts, but (usefully) is actually changing over at around 2.7 volts under test.  The diode is just a precaution against reverse voltages across the LED.

 

Both cards in position on the chassis...  

 

attachicon.gifJung card 3.JPG

 

The small relay card will take some cab space but much of it tucks under the line of the driver's control panel.   The engine compartment top body panel will be lined with ali foil to dissipate any hotspots from the 7805s.   The front running light clusters have now been wired to a small vero "distribution" card at the front of the chassis to ease later connection.

DC Kits also stock the Hollywood Foundry motor unit, specifically designed to fit this kit, not cheap but excellent unit, the review in Model Rail Magazine by George Dent said:

 

The drive almost completely fills the engine compartment of the model with a powerful, smooth belt drive. The motor is a Mashima 1628 with plenty of power and a slow maximum speed, coupled with a silent 32:1 belt drive. The drive is ready to fit to the model, all you need to do is drill two mounting holes, 2mm in diameter and fit the drive with the supplied screws. A template for drilling the two holes is supplied with each drive mechanism.The drive features excellent slow speed performance with a smoother silent operation. Given that enough weight could be added to the model, this drive would easily out-perform the prototype in terms of pulling power.

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Going a bit OT here, what is the situation with the supply of Knightwing loco kits? To the best of my knowledge there are now unavailable, and likely to remain so? I'm more interested in getting hold of the other one, but would welcome some news on availability.

 

Stewart

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Hi Stewart the Knightwing 0-4-0 LOCO1 kit is still being advertised on

 http://www.knightwing.co.uk/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?product=OO-HO_Loco_Kits&cart_id=1376937338.270

at £12.95, but it's not looking promising for the 0-6-0 LOCO3 kit with price currently shown as £0.00.    Nothing doing on eBay just now either - plenty of other Knightwing kits just no locos.   Would be worth emailing [email protected] to ask if this is just a temporary lull in production?

Edited by wcrpaul
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Earlier in this discussion it asked about securing SPUDs into the body. I've made several 0-16.5 narrow gauge locos powered by SPUDs. I make the spud a fairly tight fit inside the underframe, then secure it in place with Blu-tac. Simple, cheap and effective.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Meanwhile....   here's my RK20 with lights wired, and its top on:

 

post-17585-0-52427000-1378150904.jpg

 

The engine compartment cover is lined with ali foil to dissipate any hotspots from the 7805s.

 

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The colour is Railmatch 214 Strathclyde/Loadhaul Orange which I chose after seeing a pic of a full sized Jung this colour.

 

I had a problem with the flashing roof light due to regulated track power not being clean enough to give uniform reliable pulses from the LED or a separate (M34-2L) flasher IC.    The solution is 2 additional 10uF smoothing capacitors (one for fwd polarity, one for reverse).   The challenge is where onboard to put them!    So for the time being this is my alternative cheap-and-cheerful fix:-

 

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I've left the cab roof removable.  The LED is powered by a CR1632 3V button cell, which is just the right size to fit snugly under the roof and not be visible from the outside.   Of course, an added bonus is that the LED carries on flashing when the loco is stationary.  The off-switch is a sliver of paper slid under the contact.    I don't know how long the cell will last, but it has been used for several days and shows no sign of fading.

 

There's a bit more detailing work to do, but I couldn't resist a posed shot on my compact "OO" table layout....

 

post-17585-0-33285600-1378152045.jpg

Edited by wcrpaul
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  • 5 years later...

What a great little model and some wonderful crafted examples on displayed here. Any idea what this loco is based on, or similar too?

 

Would it look out of place on a 1950/60s layout?

 

kind regards,

 

Mookie 

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Hi Mookie thank you very much for your comments.

The Knightwing loco is based on the German Jung RK20B diesel hydraulic.

But it certainly wouldn't look out of place in a UK industrial scene in 1950/60 or later (imho).   

(My example spent most of the last weekend "shuttling" on my "Claremont Road" exhibit at Heywood MRS show in Rochdale.)

Here's a full sized example manufactured in 1952:-

https://www.bahnspezl.de/content/deutschland/diesellokomotiven-sonstige/jung/11559-1952-jung-rk-20-b.html

 

Paul.

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19 hours ago, Mookie said:

What a great little model and some wonderful crafted examples on displayed here. Any idea what this loco is based on, or similar too?

 

Would it look out of place on a 1950/60s layout?

 

The Knightwing loco is somewhat wider than most 00 locos. Somewhere safe is one I cut down in width some time ago which is just waiting for a 0-6-0 chassis to power it, you could always shorten the kit as well to make a 0-4-0.

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12 minutes ago, Poor Old Bruce said:

 

The Knightwing loco is somewhat wider than most 00 locos. Somewhere safe is one I cut down in width some time ago which is just waiting for a 0-6-0 chassis to power it, you could always shorten the kit as well to make a 0-4-0.

 

Hi Bruce I have to say I have never found width, platform clearance etc. to be a problem with my finished Jung  RK20B kit.   But note that the loco pictured in this thread is the 0-4-0 Knightwing "LOCO1" kit.    The 0-6-0 kit, which I have not seen on sale for several years was "LOCO3" - a Sentinel type IIRC.

 

Paul.

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I have a motorised example of the Knightwing Sentinel purchased as a none runner. The problem is that the drive is to the centre axle only relying on the plastic connecting rods to take the drive to the other axles which are out of alignment. Also when the loco is sitting on the track the driven centre axle doesn't even touch the track! Branchlines used to make a chassis kit for this locomotive but like the plastic kit itself it is long out of production. I wonder why Knightwing no longer produce this kit? 

Edited by PhilJ W
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Perhaps they were receiving just too many complaints about misaligned axles.   A shame though, as the body component would have been a really good candidate for a "homebrew" aluminium chassis,,,

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3 hours ago, wcrpaul said:

Perhaps they were receiving just too many complaints about misaligned axles.   A shame though, as the body component would have been a really good candidate for a "homebrew" aluminium chassis,,,

My example was motorised with an after market metal chassis, it may well be a Branchlines chassis but whoever built the chassis didn't make a very good job of it. They even used the plastic cranks from the kit which are starting to split. I did hear it said that the Knightwing moulds for the kit were damaged and that is why the model was withdrawn.

Edited by PhilJ W
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22 hours ago, wcrpaul said:

 

Hi Bruce I have to say I have never found width, platform clearance etc. to be a problem with my finished Jung  RK20B kit.   But note that the loco pictured in this thread is the 0-4-0 Knightwing "LOCO1" kit.    The 0-6-0 kit, which I have not seen on sale for several years was "LOCO3" - a Sentinel type IIRC.

 

The one I am talking about is the LOCO1 as shown above (a shrunken 03 or 04 shunter type of thing), not a Sentinel. Just use the body with the footplate reduced in width, it shouldn't be beyond the imagination to make an 0-6-0 chassis but I have got distracted by the immediate post-grouping period.

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