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mullie

Pott Row and Upbech St Mary a journey through 00 and then into EM

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Oh!  Didn't know you could buy ready made sugar beet loads.  They look pretty good!

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Barry Walls. who built Wallsea Main, used grape pips as I recall.

 

I always suspected that they were rather small for the real thing.

You do not want one of them falling onto your car bonnet if you are behind a loaded lorry in the campaign!

All the lorries round here are supposed to use some method of restraining the load, to the best of my knowledge (yeah right).

 

The ready made loads look the part, having been up close and personal with the stuff.

I can almost feel my fingers drying out and cracking up as I look at them.

Where's the Snowfire?!

 

Ian T

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7 hours ago, ianathompson said:

Barry Walls. who built Wallsea Main, used grape pips as I recall.

 

I always suspected that they were rather small for the real thing.

 

 

Well done, you have guessed the person I was thinking of!  Perhaps grape pips would be nearer to 4mm scale sugar beets, then?

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We always buy seedless grapes so it would take a very long time to get a load together!

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As far as I know sugar beet traffic is not often modelled, it ties down a layout geographically as it is not grown in all areas. It was a major source of railway traffic in the 50s and I think it was the photos of Ian Allen in his numerous books, including those on the Stoke Ferry Branch, that sparked my interest. It kept stations open that would have otherwise shut because of the amount of beet traffic produced, Snape being an example.

 

Must stop taking this view but it does work rather well, makes the layout look far bigger than it actually is. In the immediate foreground you can just see that the water front is finally being developed, more photos soon.

 

755379567_wagonloadretro.jpg.6754d48a7fdcae634a27a817a39a6799.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I have always included sugar beet traffic on my  layout, which as you might know is narrow gauge and operationally orientated.

I made the loads years ago by heaping pearl barley onto plastic bases.

 

A recent operating session featured sugar beet working as one of the main themes and I took a few photos of these trains.

At the risk of hi-jacking your thread I include a photo.

 

37594797395_9358155bb5_c.jpg3-60 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

Two massive bogie wagons of beet are pulled out of the siding at Boursson. They are standard gauge wagons travelling on transporter wagons. They will be handed off to the mainline network at the junction.

The loco, a hulking brute if ever there was one, was a standard gauge Bo-Bo which has been converted to a narrow gauge Co-Co.

(This was based on similar conversions carried out in East Germany.)

 

Hope that this is of interest and, in shameless plug, more photos can be found at 

 

https://myafk.net/operating-session-3

 

Ian T

Edited by ianathompson
typo
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ianathompson said:

I have always included sugar beet traffic on my  layout, which as you might know is narrow gauge and operationally orientated.

I made the loads years ago by heaping pearl barley onto plastic bases.

 

A recent operating session featured sugar beet working as one of the main themes and I took a few photos of these trains.

At the risk of hi-jacking your thread I include a photo.

 

https://flic.kr/p/Zh8atZ3-60 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

Two massive bogie wagons of beet are pulled out of the siding at Boursson. They are standard gauge wagons travelling on transporter wagons. They will be handed off to the mainline network at the junction.

The loco, a hulking brute if ever there was one, was a standard gauge Bo-Bo which has been converted to a narrow gauge Co-Co.

(This was based on similar conversions carried out in East Germany.)

 

Hope that this is of interest and, in shameless plug, more photos can be found at 

 

https://myafk.net/operating-session-3

 

Ian T

Please hijack away, very nice to see. What scale is it, looks like O, what is the track gauge?

 

Martyn

 

 

Edited by mullie

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1 hour ago, ianathompson said:

I have always included sugar beet traffic on my  layout, which as you might know is narrow gauge and operationally orientated.

I made the loads years ago by heaping pearl barley onto plastic bases.

 

A recent operating session featured sugar beet working as one of the main themes and I took a few photos of these trains.

At the risk of hi-jacking your thread I include a photo.

 

https://flic.kr/p/Zh8atZ3-60 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

Two massive bogie wagons of beet are pulled out of the siding at Boursson. They are standard gauge wagons travelling on transporter wagons. They will be handed off to the mainline network at the junction.

The loco, a hulking brute if ever there was one, was a standard gauge Bo-Bo which has been converted to a narrow gauge Co-Co.

(This was based on similar conversions carried out in East Germany.)

 

Hope that this is of interest and, in shameless plug, more photos can be found at 

 

https://myafk.net/operating-session-3

 

Ian T

Just had a brief look at your site, what a fascinating line you are building and your approach is quite refreshing. I will have a more detailed look later. Thanks for posting. And yes, I now know what gauge you are working too, should have read the right page!

 

Martyn

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A week of consolidation really. The water frontage is now largely completed using acrylic varnish for the water.

 

IMG_20190602_140810822.jpg.7d184c2304a29d8aa1491d644c5f1ca0.jpg

 

A new fiddle yard has been started, the current one is just too small but will be retained once replaced as I know it will have its uses. The new one is being built with an eye on future projects, the length was set by the need to accommodate a Claud and two coaches, the biggest the layout will need to handle.

 

IMG_20190602_140700060.jpg.3945f90559893bbca0b3f166ebc0e8ad.jpg

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An interloper on the quay

 

1922098469_08onthequay.jpg.e626a3bbd0bc52eaf456e94b70a3e864.jpg

Until a suitable layout is built the loco will be run on on this layout. Gibson wheels and cranks with Hornby rods, PDH steps. The steps are very delicate, not sure I would do it again on the Bachmann shunter still to be completed. A piece of cab glazing has disappeared I will need to source some new, probably Lazer glaze. The loco still carries its original number, when a suitable layout is built it will be renumbered accordingly.

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Decision has been taken to extend the fiddle yard so a tender loco can work two wagons and a long wheel base brake van. An extra bit has been glued and screwed onto the end. Like all my woodwork, it is bodged but should work and has been made out of recycled wood from other projects or recovered from bits of furniture. I rarely buy screws as again I reuse screws saved from dismantled furniture.

 

IMG_20190616_145156924.jpg.e40dc4e74a3565b192068295af3e4250.jpg

 

Cassettes will be made using thin MDF base with ply sides, they don't need to be over engineered ( I hope) as trains will be short. The cassette bases still need a little bit of trimming. The fiddle yard seen in an earlier post will be used for a new project.

 

IMG_20190616_145219388.jpg.291ad9f6cc2085128e718773e22a28f2.jpg

 

Being completely rigid the J72 chassis is sensitive to any unevenness in the track so an opportunity has been taken to deal with any bits that have settled. The water tower and crane have been removed for safe keeping. This means I can make sure the entrance to the fiddle yard runs smoothly.

 

IMG_20190616_154902646.jpg.beae0c1ccd0381564e13a1d85fe0ff59.jpg

 

IMG_20190616_154855752.jpg.0529f11a8e60105dde490b6a87817c49.jpg

Edited by mullie
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Mullie,

 

As discussed elsewhere, I really like what you're doing here. As I mentioned I am also looking at modelling sugar beet traffic and am considering options for representing it as a load in 7mm scale. 

 

On 31/05/2019 at 09:00, mullie said:

Must stop taking this view but it does work rather well...

 

I think that shot is incredibly atmospheric. You have captured the flat, big open skies landscape of the fens perfectly. It belies the small size of the layout and is testament to your fantastic modelling skills. 

 

Oh and there is nothing wrong with a bit of woodwork bodging! If it does the job then that is the only thing that matters. 

 

Keep up the good work!

David 

 

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