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Pott Row and Upbech St Mary a journey through 00 and then into EM


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Darker nights and colder garage mean projects that can be completed at the dining room table are desirable. Tonight, building and fitting Kadee couplings.

 

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The wooden bodied wagons have Nem no 18s, needless to say the height is wrong! No 5s have been assembled tonight and plasticard packing pieces added to the mineral wagons in preparation for fitting, probably tomorrow night.

 

I'm finding that the hinged magnets are not as strong as the between the rails magnets so some fettling will be required to get reliable uncoupling. Kadees take more setting up than I thought they would though being new to them I suppose I will get better at it.

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The mineral and wooden bodied wagons ran on the layout for the first time since couplings were fitted. The class 10 shunter ran the service now it is numbered on both sides.

 

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The wagons have sugar beet loads, these need some work on their colouring. Three 16 tonners and a seven plank.

 

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This 16 tonner will have a coal load, need to organise a load for the five plank.

 

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Here they all are at Upbech.

 

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All the wagons have been 'braked,' smal pieces of sponge have been set to gently rub against the wheels. This way they are not so sensitive to the magnets and are more easily shunted. S&W fitted wagons don't seem to need this.

 

This week's jobs; paint crew and interior of the class 10, weather 16 tonners and paint the loads.

 

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The class 10 is now largely completed, interior has been added with crew, just some tidying up around the front end needed.

 

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The minerals are now weathered and the colouring of the beet loads has been improved. One of the 16 tonners will have a coal load eventually, I wanted them to look used but not to the point of destruction, those in photos of beet trains in the early to mid 60s don't look too heavily abused. I took the opportunity to recolour all the beet loads I owned and they were quickly dropped into the wagons for reasons explained below.

 

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Seven plank wagon with beet load.

 

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Normal modelling has been suspended for around ten days, whilst driving back from Dorchester this morning the rear screen of my wife's car basically exploded for no reason. The joys of living here and the problems of the pandemic means it will take ten days to get someone out to replace the screen even though it was insured. Therefore the garage has had to be cleared to store the car as it was not weather tight, they will effect a temporary repair in a few days but that won't keep the weather out.

 

I have turned my attention to renovating some of my buildings to see what can be used on the quayside scene. Haven't played with any building s for a while.

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I should have said that once a car is in the garage the layout is completely inaccessible because the layout is on the far wall of an integral garage, this car only just fits in the garage. I won't see the layout until the car is able to be outside again. Working on buildings means I can undertake some different projects on the dining room table or in my study area.

 

I have spent a lot of time this year on track work and stock, working on buildings will make a nice change.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This is what has been going on lately, nothing very exiting though it helps the layout to work better.

 

The original rail joiners for the fiddle yard were cut down Peco because I ran out of SMP ones during lock down, always a compromise. Having bought some along with an order of rail I have got round to replacing the Peco joiners, these ones give a much better join and more positive electrical contact with SMP rail. All are soldered in place.

 

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I needed more cassettes so have added rail joiners to one of the original Upbech cassettes, with the right thickness of wood underneath these are now usable.  The thinner cassettes can therefore be used with both fiddle yards. More cassettes can now be modified though I will need to build more stock too!

 

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The first of the updated buildings is more or less finished. I have a soft spot for this building, it is my second version of the cottage built from plans in the Peco book of Model Buildings by Mike Gill, a book of its time though I think it still has a lot to commend it. I must have built this around twenty years ago. Wills windows (this is what I had) have been used with thinned frames and the sash windows given proper relief.  Wills guttering with down pipes of plastic rod and a rebuilt roof using Scalescenes slates. Weathering is chalks and charcoal.

 

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The diesel stock is going to be replaced by the steamers this weekend so stock had to be cleared but at least the line hasn't been affected by the Beeching cuts yet.

 

Class 10 shunter collecting wagons at Upbech

 

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Type 2 has collected the remaining wagons from the as yet unnamed station.

 

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Edited by mullie
Spellcheck mistake Grrrrrrrr!
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That type 2 looks great (for a diesel ;)) it's funny how things that were commonplace and largely ignored when I was a kid have grown on me and for some reason that livery reminds me of time spent in eastern Europe. I like the job you have made of lightly weathering on the cottage. You can tell that the bottom two feet of every wall would be riddled with damp! 

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Trams go way!!!   Never!   The electric ones are on the increase all round the world and now into Ultra Light.   The smell of steam may have gone away but watch out for the new whiff.   Biomethane.   Turning 'cow packs' into 'power packs'.   After all the 'tram' has had many centuries more of life than 'rail' so has been 'light' years ahead!!!   Colin.

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In all honesty I don't know, I just wanted to try building one. In early goods yards they did go off at angles so I used that as my excuse and there are a number of examples, I came across some in East Anglia and I seem to remember some around Bristol too.

 

Martyn

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20 minutes ago, wiggoforgold said:

It looks good. I've always been attracted by the idea of a working wagon tt. For the site  I have in mind, not having the roads  at right angles to each other would make instalation easier.

Alex

 

I'm intrigued, Alex...

 

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On 14/11/2020 at 18:25, mullie said:

 Got the wagon turntable working today

 

 

Crafty. The rotation looks smoother and more natural than most other wagon turntables I've seen. 

 

Ten years ago there was a nice capstan shunting layout on here, built by @49395. The thread is here: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/3409-mikes-2010-challenge-entry/.

 

He made a short video:

 

 

I expect you have already seen Chris Nevard's chain-shunting video.

Edited by Mikkel
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4 hours ago, wiggoforgold said:

It looks good. I've always been attracted by the idea of a working wagon tt. For the site  I have in mind, not having the roads  at right angles to each other would make instalation easier.

Alex

There are plenty of examples where the roads were not at right angles, there's a nice photo of one such example in this thread:

Within large goods yards and when used at stations two turntables next to each other to move wagons between adjacent parallel roads would be commonplace.

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On 14/11/2020 at 17:25, mullie said:

 Got the wagon turntable working today...

That does look good.  Another way of moving wagons on/off the turntable is a motorised wagon, such as the High Level fly shunter chassis.  I built one a while ago (although still haven't quite finished it!).

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The siding is so short it is not worth building the High Level Kit. However, I do have my eye on it for other purposes either to power a further tram or to try and build a model of what was effectively a motorised wagon used on the Wissington Light Railway.

 

Thanks for the comments everyone.

 

Martyn

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Looking good! On Burntisland 1883 they've done something clever with a sequence of magnets that might be worth looking at. Or, in keeping with the approach you've used for powering the turntable, maybe you could have a single magnet under the stub siding that you slide along to move the wagon. It does rely on having steel axles, of course!

Edited by icw
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39 minutes ago, icw said:

Looking good! On Burntisland 1883 they've done something clever with a sequence of magnets that might be worth looking at. Or, in keeping with the approach you've used for powering the turntable, maybe you could have a single magnet under the stub siding that you slide along to move the wagon. It does rely on having steel axles, of course!

I've seen and been impressed by Burntisland.

 

I plan to either rope or chain shunt the siding, it will take some time to happen as I need to finish the buildings and start developing the quayside.

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Later on a Tuesday night between about 8.30 and 10pm has become a good time for modelling mid week as it coincides with the Jamie Cullum jazz show on radio 2. I have listened to this show since the days when it was on late on Sunday nights followed by a live gig at midnight.

 

This building is very loosley based on the Bell pub in Kersey but doesn't really look like it. The first part was built over twenty years ago, is being refurbished and I am building an extension. This is progress so far, cobbled together out of plasticard with card timbers that will be infilled with polyfilla (possibly, not sure yet to be honest). Tiled roof from Scalescenes parts

 

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11 hours ago, mullie said:

Later on a Tuesday night between about 8.30 and 10pm has become a good time for modelling mid week as it coincides with the Jamie Cullum jazz show on radio 2. I have listened to this show since the days when it was on late on Sunday nights followed by a live gig at midnight.

 

This building is very loosley based on the Bell pub in Kersey but doesn't really look like it. The first part was built over twenty years ago, is being refurbished and I am building an extension. This is progress so far, cobbled together out of plasticard with card timbers that will be infilled with polyfilla (possibly, not sure yet to be honest). Tiled roof from Scalescenes parts

 

20201117_215038.jpg.275d0380984153b4d334cc73d5ba6c23.jpg

 

20201117_215044.jpg.2c4c8efdb11d66b487274f29f8e96fb6.jpg

 

20201117_215105.jpg.492722bd17c4c069f087ddd6539c9d25.jpg

 

I like the timbered buildings which look quite convincing. The right hand building, however, and I presume it's meant to be a stone building, looks a bit odd and the main reason for this is that the Wills mouldings used are really intended for stone buildings and have been used upside down. The bits you've mounted at the bottom are called 'hood moulds' or, alternatively, 'drip moulds' which explains their purpose - to keep water from running down the wall out of the window. Used as cills like this, you'd find that the water would get trapped in the bottom of the windows.

The pattern Wills have produced are utterly typical and they're so familiar I've never bothered to take a picture specifically to show one so here's a crop from a survey picture I took of Gainford near Darlington:

 

Gainford_Hood_Mould.jpg.5ebd39cc541eebce52342b8a7411f2e0.jpg

 

Note how the moulding is set into the wall.

 

Adam

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9 hours ago, Adam said:

 

I like the timbered buildings which look quite convincing. The right hand building, however, and I presume it's meant to be a stone building, looks a bit odd and the main reason for this is that the Wills mouldings used are really intended for stone buildings and have been used upside down. The bits you've mounted at the bottom are called 'hood moulds' or, alternatively, 'drip moulds' which explains their purpose - to keep water from running down the wall out of the window. Used as cills like this, you'd find that the water would get trapped in the bottom of the windows.

The pattern Wills have produced are utterly typical and they're so familiar I've never bothered to take a picture specifically to show one so here's a crop from a survey picture I took of Gainford near Darlington:

 

Gainford_Hood_Mould.jpg.5ebd39cc541eebce52342b8a7411f2e0.jpg

 

Note how the moulding is set into the wall.

 

Adam

Thanks for pointing that out, will be remedied over the weekend.

 

Martyn

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