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EBay madness


Marcyg
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I am slightly shellshocked - I know prices had gone way up but never expected this :

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bachmann-44-221-Scenecraft-Low-Relief-underground-station-OO-Gauge/254599473641?hash=item3b474fa9e9:g:UOAAAOSw-5pewT-P

 

 

I know they are discontinued but £137 for a low relief underground entrance is frankly amazing.

 

 

Karl

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8 hours ago, corax67 said:

I am slightly shellshocked - I know prices had gone way up but never expected this :

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bachmann-44-221-Scenecraft-Low-Relief-underground-station-OO-Gauge/254599473641?hash=item3b474fa9e9:g:UOAAAOSw-5pewT-P

 

 

I know they are discontinued but £137 for a low relief underground entrance is frankly amazing.

 

 

Karl

 

7 hours ago, MrWolf said:

You should see the Bachmann 4 car underground set he is also selling, 9 bids to £490.00 with 6 days 18 hours to go.

 

Sorry folks, I'm all out of witticisms.

 

No witticisms required.

The seller is a member on here and has explained the situation, these are sales on behalf of a charitable organisation that he knew were worth more if auctioned than if flogged off in the shop.

Fair play to him, if people are willing to pay, why shouldn't any seller reap the reward?

 

Mike.

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1 hour ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

 

 

No witticisms required.

The seller is a member on here and has explained the situation, these are sales on behalf of a charitable organisation that he knew were worth more if auctioned than if flogged off in the shop.

Fair play to him, if people are willing to pay, why shouldn't any seller reap the reward?

 

Mike.

Or indeed the charity concerned!

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There is always a distinction between sellers listing badly described items and/or flying a kite as to ludicrous values; and the situation where accurately listed itesm are successfully selling for prices that are well above what they either sold for new or were selling for a few months ago. The first type can be entertaining although care should be taken not to descend into cruelty - we know not what issues the seller may have with personal circumstances, mental health etc.

 

The second type can often descend into jealousy or envy - model railway items are (and have been for many years) batch produced items for a niche market and supply and demand means that if a particular item sells out prices can rocket. They can also fall back in future years if another run or a superior item is produced. The Lockdown has produced a surge in both 'indoor' hobbies; and a restriction in the supply of goods - fewer auctions, no toyfairs or autojumbles, which are the kind of method by which the trade acquires goods to sell - and suddenly prices are hardening. The Bachmann London Underground items I would always have tipped as becoming premium items once they were no longer freely available. In that way they are little diffrenet from the Hornby Dublo or Triang EMUs or overhead electric locos, all of which were slow sellers when made but premium items as soon as they were deleted (although in most cases much cheaper now in real terms than 30 years ago because superior substitutes have subsequently been made).

 

One item that I have found has surged in price are the original Hornby HST models. Most enthusiasts won't give these a second look - short Mk3s, early Ringfield mechanism with poor pickups, and later better models from both Lima (budget) and Hornby (superdetail) models to cater for various needs. But they depict an iconic train and many people in their 40s and 50s would have had this as a train set item so suddenly all the ingredients are there for a price surge. In the past I have pciked up sets for £10 or £15 but in the current climate, no chance:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hornby-Inner-City-125-BR-High-Speed-Train-Set-trains-in-excellent-condition-/324170444378?hash=item4b7a106e5a%3Ag%3A0TAAAOSwrFtewvb6&nma=true&si=o6vujWM5gR4FCdbgJRWXxKuad5A%3D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hornby-Railways-Intercity-125-High-Speed-Electric-Train-Set-R685-1970-s-/174278364415?epid=1148983971&hash=item2893ccccff%3Ag%3AbTgAAOSwbNteuBaK&nma=true&si=o6vujWM5gR4FCdbgJRWXxKuad5A%3D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

 

Even Cartmel's sold one!

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hornby-RAILWAYS-No-R-401-BR-Class-43-253-028-125-HST-HIGH-SPEED-TRAIN-PACK/303335731424?epid=10017671214&hash=item46a037f0e0:g:KZEAAMXQJRhRbisj

 

Edited by andyman7
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10 hours ago, corax67 said:

Hi guys - I’d like to clarify my position with regard to these sales.

 

We at St Michael & All Angels in Wilmington have been running a charity railway show over 20 years as part of our outreach and giving. The 4 charities we support are Demelza House children’s hospice, Cherished Memories, Railway Children & St Michael youth project.

 

During these 20 years we have raised over £200,000 for charity through the show proceeds and the sale of items donated by very generous supporters, retailers and manufacturers.

 

This year C-19 has led to the almost inevitable cancellation of our show, at a time when the charities are at their hardest pressed for funds.

 

A great friend and supporter of the show passed away late last year and bequeathed all his railway stock to us, we have also disassembled his extensive layout at the request of his estate for sale.

 

In order to still generate funds for the charities we took the decision to liquidate as much of the boxed stock via eBay as we can which is what I’ve started to do - I genuinely had no idea that things had gone quite so silly on there which is the sole reason I put up my recent post about the Bachmann underground entrance.

 

I’m not looking to profiteer, swindle or rip off anyone only to sell the things we’d usually simply sell through our secondhand stall.

 

 

Karl

 

 

 

There is a lesson there for post-covid fundraising: second-hand stalls are not an effective way of fundraising, not least because on-line selling reaches a much larger audience.

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In all probability there will not be that many second hand traders about once the Covid-19 crisis is over. Most depend on exhibitions and swap meets for their business. A few are on E-bay but many are not and also those who don't depend on the income from selling will just discontinue trading. 

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1 hour ago, PhilJ W said:

In all probability there will not be that many second hand traders about once the Covid-19 crisis is over. Most depend on exhibitions and swap meets for their business. A few are on E-bay but many are not and also those who don't depend on the income from selling will just discontinue trading. 

Loads of clearance bargains?? Who knows!

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3 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

There is a lesson there for post-covid fundraising: second-hand stalls are not an effective way of fundraising, not least because on-line selling reaches a much larger audience.

 

True, but it takes a fair bit more effort. A s/h stall will shift a lot of stock in a short time, without the need for generating ebay listings and then wrapping and posting items to the buyer; it's surprising just how time consuming ebay selling can be.

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3 hours ago, Sweep said:

 

Looks like it’s taken a sudden journey from the table to the floor and then been sat upon.

 

I think I’ll pass.

 

Darius

Edited by Darius43
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4 hours ago, polybear said:

 

True, but it takes a fair bit more effort. A s/h stall will shift a lot of stock in a short time, without the need for generating ebay listings and then wrapping and posting items to the buyer; it's surprising just how time consuming ebay selling can be.

I agree, but, p!aying devils advocate, you have to take into account travelling to a sale location, setting up time, breaking down after, and travel home.

Also if you are manning (sorry am I allowed to say that these days) the  stall, you have to be there whether stuff is selling or not.  wheras selling on line, you can list at your convenience, let the stuff sell itself, and, within reason, wrap and dispatch to suit you.

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7 hours ago, Sweep said:

 

He could get a set of etched plates for it and rename it Sir Ralph Wedgewood - It's not been dropped, that's scale blitz damage guv'nor!

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It's a funny thing, collecting, it doesn't matter what you are interested in. There is always that one thing that is the key item and often wipes out the saving you might have made on the rest of a set. A friend was selling a whole raft of vintage model railway locos and stock from Bassett Lowke, Exley, Marklin etc to more prosaic items like Trix and Triang. The thing that got all the attention was a Triang American diesel set. He was constantly asked to sell just the centre car, the whole thing was mint and boxed. The loco and dummy are apparently common as muck, but the centre car jacks up the value considerably. I bet if he had split the set it would have been on eBay the same night.

We recently renovated and sold a bedroom set made for Harrods in the late 50s. Individually, the items are worth a few hundred pounds each. But if you find the dressing table, which was the most fragile part, that was least practical (and for a time unfashionable) then the price (I don't like the word value too much!) more than quadruples.

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A lot of the posts here are about overpriced amateur weathering jobs.  I’ve just seen this from The Model Centre, whose speciality is weathering and who, to be fair, are usually OK:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2S-008-011-Dapol-N-A4-Silver-Fox-2512-LNER-Silver-Grey-Valanced-Coal-Weathered/264600779816?hash=item3d9b6f7c28:g:BhEAAOSwTm1eIInH

 

The pristine version is yours for £120 from Rails.  I’m not at all sure that TMC’s professional weathering on this one is really worth an extra £70?  Looking at the only picture, it looks as if they’ve just given it a quick mist of brown “brake dust” dirt and then dabbed some “rust“ patches on the Cartazzi truck and the tender chassis. In other words, they’ve weathered it as if it was a grubby 1970s class 24 diesel.  

 

I’ve noticed this “brown brake dust” weathering on other commercial steam models, and it always looks wrong.  In this case five minutes looking at some photos would show that the first four A4s in silver livery were prestige top link locos kept well cleaned: the weathering they got was largely trapped dirt emphasising the seams in the cladding, and a black oily sheen wash on the wheels and motion. And in no way would they have been allowed off shed with *any* visible rust on the chassis!

I’d expect a model in this state to be discounted, not sold at a premium.   Not TMC’s best effort.


(Mind you, they have 

glued some real coal on the tender, and we all know that’s getting quite rare.)

Edited by RichardT
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6 hours ago, jivebunny said:

Well, this has to be the most reluctant purchase I've ever made, and I'm certainly guilty of encouraging eBay madness here: approx £90 BIN for a long-out-of-production and very-hard-to-find postal TGV trailer which had a RRP of about £25 at the time... The damn thing only has four wheels!

 

You know what though, I do wonder if this is the exception. 

 

If you had kept looking, would you have been able to find one for less than £90? If so, How much lower; £80, £70? How long would you have had to look for, would it have been in as good condition? 

 

I really don't want to sound like i'm lambasting you - i'm actually encouraging you! I often decide there is a scale of how much things are worth vs how common they are, how often they come up, condition etc. and it's up to each person to decide where they want to slot in on the scale. Ebay Madness is (I think) when these factors are completely out of line and the scales don't tip in the right direction! 

 

Personally, I think the Postal Trailer looks fantastic, as does the rest of the TGV! :good_mini:

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11 hours ago, RichardT said:

 

 

I’ve noticed this “brown brake dust” weathering on other commercial steam models, and it always looks wrong.  In this case five minutes looking at some photos would show that the first four A4s in silver livery were prestige top link locos kept well cleaned: the weathering they got was largely trapped dirt emphasising the seams in the cladding, and a black oily sheen wash on the wheels and motion. And in no way would they have been allowed off shed with *any* visible rust on the chassis!
 

My dear old Uncle was a top link at the + and although he drove just about everything he said the A4 was his favourite, and when he was driving he would never take it off shed or holding unless it was gleaming........

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