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How to get lynched at a model railway show


BR60103
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59 minutes ago, Chris116 said:

Have a five minute advert break in operation every hour!

I did though rather like the approach that Bill Banwell and Frank Applegate adopted when they exhibited their 0 gauge Maybank layout before the war (when complete operating layouts were fairly rare). I've seem photos of it at the MRC Easter show with a large sign sayinfg "The next demonstration will be at...  with a clockface showing when it would be. ISTR in descriptions that the timetable took about 20m-30m to run through (It was a four platform MLT with a high level loco shed over the motorised traverser storage sidings. Presumably the time between these fairly intense operating sessions allowed them to discuss the layout with fellow modellers and visitors as well as setting up for he next session. 

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A clever approach; the punters are informed when the action is going to be, the operators get plenty of time off to recover (30 minutes intense operating of a 4 platform MLT is pretty intense), and the 'demonstration' idea suggests a seriousness and shows who's in charge.  It covers's the 'nothing's happening on this one, let's go and find one where there is something happening' situation.  One would be tempted to post up 'next train at', but 'next demonstration at' is much better and creates a more professional impression, that of an event, as oppose to something that's going to happen at x o'clock!

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On 19/09/2021 at 14:48, F-UnitMad said:

As soon as anyone new comes along to view the layout, hold a massive, view-blocking advert up in front of them. Make sure the advert is for something with absolutely nothing to do with model trains.

:spiteful:  ;)

Soap

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On 19/09/2021 at 23:48, F-UnitMad said:

As soon as anyone new comes along to view the layout, hold a massive, view-blocking advert up in front of them. Make sure the advert is for something with absolutely nothing to do with model trains.

:spiteful:  ;)

You mean the Bradford Flying Scotsman clock?

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I’m going to try running my layout at a fairly slow pace (for me) at the next exhibition. Although it’s a roundy roundy the operation will strictly be:-

1. semaphore signals drop to clear for the next train 

2. train either runs through or stops

3. Signals set to danger after whole train has passed

4. look up next manoeuvre on sequence

5. set points for next train and back to 1

 

This will provide a steady procession of different trains over a half hour sequence. Each train will be seen twice during that half hour which I think is nice. It will be interesting to see if visitors mostly enjoy this or mostly walk away as soon as one train has gone through. I’m hoping some folk at least will get interest from seeing what is due next by watching the signals. There will still be at least a train a minute passing through the layout but that might not be enough for some. 
 

I expect that, much to my annoyance, the layout will revert to more of a typical roundy roundy when I take my break. What would be even more annoying is if the number of viewers increased while someone else was running it as a typical roundy roundy. I realise this could easily happen.

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Allied to the above about layout operations.

 

I have found that, quite frequently, 'guest' operators find totally different ways of working the layout to how I do it. These new ways have made things even more enjoyable for me, as I usually incorporate them into my own operations.

 

steve

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 22/09/2021 at 18:25, George Spencer said:

Go in-character as a Covid Marshal and shout "Hands! Face! Space!" at random people.

or at a particular popular layout thats 3 deep.... just sneeze then cough....boom space! 

 

please its a joke! poor at that ...... do not try it

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A long time ago we had a modelling table next to the layout. For some reason that nobody can remember there was a washing up tub on the table filled with water. The table top itself was green. We tried to pass it off as a Channel Tunnel layout. 

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On 21/09/2021 at 12:22, Chris M said:

I’m going to try running my layout at a fairly slow pace (for me) at the next exhibition. Although it’s a roundy roundy the operation will strictly be:-

1. semaphore signals drop to clear for the next train 

2. train either runs through or stops

3. Signals set to danger after whole train has passed

4. look up next manoeuvre on sequence

5. set points for next train and back to 1

 

This will provide a steady procession of different trains over a half hour sequence. Each train will be seen twice during that half hour which I think is nice. It will be interesting to see if visitors mostly enjoy this or mostly walk away as soon as one train has gone through. I’m hoping some folk at least will get interest from seeing what is due next by watching the signals. There will still be at least a train a minute passing through the layout but that might not be enough for some. 
 

I expect that, much to my annoyance, the layout will revert to more of a typical roundy roundy when I take my break. What would be even more annoying is if the number of viewers increased while someone else was running it as a typical roundy roundy. I realise this could easily happen.

Does the operation of your layout involve much shunting? 

 

I remember the semaphore dropping as being part of the excitement of train watching  when I was young. You also heard first the distant whistle and then the distant sound of the train approaching long before the train actually appeared. How many exhibtion visitors would stil relate to that now though is debatable. I do recall one  layout that was just a single track between two fiddle yards with a level crossing but the crossing box with its repeaters of "off-stage" distants was fully modelled and interlocked and it was quite fascinating to watch. I do find though that layouts that are "properly" operated with operators exchanging bell codes etc. can fall flat when all that is happening unseen behind the layout and you sometimes feel that it's being done more for the benefit of the operators' sens eof authenticity  than for the public. Put the "signalman" in full view of the audience and the flow of trains, even if they nothing more than pass through ot stop becomes very much more interesting to watch.  

 

What I have too often seen (and sometimes been a party to) with large  roundy rounds)at exhibtions is that, when the various usually electrical gremlins attack while the layout is being put up the continuous run or runs inevitably get prioritised and "getting something running" means that things like shunting the goods yard never really happen. It's also very tempting to just let trains run round and round to keep things moving  while dealing with a fault or setting up the next train in the fiddle yard and I know I've been guilty of that myself.

 

One subtle advantage of terminus to fiddle yard layouts is that in order to work at all, everything needs to work: so it does.  

 

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On 05/10/2021 at 23:01, The Johnster said:

You can do that with Jinties as well. 

But not all were so fitted. The first 150 not fitted with the hole?

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1 hour ago, Pacific231G said:

Does the operation of your layout involve much shunting? 

 

I remember the semaphore dropping as being part of the excitement of train watching  when I was young. You also heard first the distant whistle and then the distant sound of the train approaching long before the train actually appeared. How many exhibtion visitors would stil relate to that now though is debatable. I do recall one  layout that was just a single track between two fiddle yards with a level crossing but the crossing box with its repeaters of "off-stage" distants was fully modelled and interlocked and it was quite fascinating to watch. I do find though that layouts that are "properly" operated with operators exchanging bell codes etc. can fall flat when all that is happening unseen behind the layout and you sometimes feel that it's being done more for the benefit of the operators' sens eof authenticity  than for the public. Put the "signalman" in full view of the audience and the flow of trains, even if they nothing more than pass through ot stop becomes very much more interesting to watch.  

 

What I have too often seen (and sometimes been a party to) with large  roundy rounds)at exhibtions is that, when the various usually electrical gremlins attack while the layout is being put up the continuous run or runs inevitably get prioritised and "getting something running" means that things like shunting the goods yard never really happen. It's also very tempting to just let trains run round and round to keep things moving  while dealing with a fault or setting up the next train in the fiddle yard and I know I've been guilty of that myself.

 

One subtle advantage of terminus to fiddle yard layouts is that in order to work at all, everything needs to work: so it does.  

 

There was one layout where the points and signals were controlled from the front of the layout using a miniature lever frame.

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4 hours ago, PhilJ W said:

There was one layout where the points and signals were controlled from the front of the layout using a miniature lever frame.

Yes and I was trying to remember its name. I think you;re probably referring to Plumpton Green an S4 model built by Barry Luck based closely on the real Plumpton station as it was in 1900-1910.

https://www.scalefour.org/scalefournorth/2017/plumptongreen/

The operational presentation was/is  very intelligently done with working models of LBSCR two position block instruments and bells but connected to lights in the two fiddle yards so you only heard the local station box bells which were not too loud (always an important consideration if you don't want to be lynched by the presenters of adjoining layouts.)

There have been others like that including Peter Denny's Leighton Buzzard (Linslade) as exhibited by Tony Gee and Goff Ashdown's Tower Pier - both termini of course and I've personally found them all fascinating to watch.

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2 hours ago, Pacific231G said:

Yes and I was trying to remember its name. I think you;re probably referring to Plumpton Green an S4 model built by Barry Luck based closely on the real Plumpton station as it was in 1900-1910.

https://www.scalefour.org/scalefournorth/2017/plumptongreen/

The operational presentation was/is  very intelligently done with working models of LBSCR two position block instruments and bells but connected to lights in the two fiddle yards so you only heard the local station box bells which were not too loud (always an important consideration if you don't want to be lynched by the presenters of adjoining layouts.)

There have been others like that including Peter Denny's Leighton Buzzard (Linslade) as exhibited by Tony Gee and Goff Ashdown's Tower Pier - both termini of course and I've personally found them all fascinating to watch.

No it wasn't that one, the one I saw was a lot smaller but IIRC it was EM or P4 and represented East London. Indeed it was at the last East London fine scale exhibition about 5 or 6 years ago as I remember.

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8 hours ago, kevinlms said:

But not all were so fitted. The first 150 not fitted with the hole?

 

First batch of 50 had the sandbox fillers on the top of the tanks. I believe that batch was ordered by the Midland Railway or very soon after the Grouping as the first ones were in traffic by 1924.

 

Later they lowered the filler for convenience, but the original 50 were never altered. 

 

If you look at this photo of a MR version you can see the filler.

 

spacer.png

Photo John Griffiths via Wiki.

 

Jason

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56 minutes ago, PhilJ W said:

No it wasn't that one, the one I saw was a lot smaller but IIRC it was EM or P4 and represented East London. Indeed it was at the last East London fine scale exhibition about 5 or 6 years ago as I remember.

No idea then Phil . Can you remember anything else about it?

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  • 4 weeks later...

Something I just saw on eBay gave me an idea...

 

If you can, get one of those early Airfix static loco kits - the "Evening Star", "Harrow" or the "City of Truro" for instance - assemble it to the best of your ability, and put it on  a plinth to the side of your layout.

 

Before you do, though, sand some of the rivets off.  A sign above the model asking "How many rivets are  missing?" will keep the rivet counters occupied for hours and cut down on the anally-retentive comments about your real exhibit. Who knows, if they disagree with each other vehemently enough they might even be asked to leave. Problem solved.

 

Problem solved until The Elucidated Brethren of the Counted Rivet realise what you're up to. Then the lynching starts.

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On 07/10/2021 at 20:25, PhilJ W said:

No it wasn't that one, the one I saw was a lot smaller but IIRC it was EM or P4 and represented East London. Indeed it was at the last East London fine scale exhibition about 5 or 6 years ago as I remember.

The last East London Finescale Model Railway Exhibition was on 7th/8th November 2015 at Whybridge Junior School, Blacksmiths Lane, Rainham. Essex.

Layouts that attended were:-

Horseblock Lane N gauge.

Detford OO gauge

Cheddar S4

Willowbrook Marsh O gauge

Fen Drove O gauge

Sandford & Banwell S4

Llams y nit 3mm

Harlyn Pier O gauge

Port Wenn O-16.5

 

Andy Neil.

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2 hours ago, andytrains said:

The last East London Finescale Model Railway Exhibition was on 7th/8th November 2015 at Whybridge Junior School, Blacksmiths Lane, Rainham. Essex.

Layouts that attended were:-

Horseblock Lane N gauge.

Detford OO gauge

Cheddar S4

Willowbrook Marsh O gauge

Fen Drove O gauge

Sandford & Banwell S4

Llams y nit 3mm

Harlyn Pier O gauge

Port Wenn O-16.5

 

Andy Neil.

It must have been the 2013 or 2014 exhibition then as it was held in the Thames Gateway College.

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6 hours ago, CameronL said:

Problem solved until The Elucidated Brethren of the Counted Rivet realise what you're up to. Then the lynching starts.

That's the sort of name for a club that sounds like it really should exist!! I wouldn't want to join it, though!!

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53 minutes ago, F-UnitMad said:

That's the sort of name for a club that sounds like it really should exist!! I wouldn't want to join it, though!!

Don't fret - It's probably by invitation only...

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