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Bath Queen Square

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the cobbles are carved filler

 

:O

 

 

That must have taken a while! Looks like it was worth it though!

 

Tom.

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Beautifully modelled Jerry. I love the allotment.

Don

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Fantastic, and quite a project for one person. This is a stunning piece of work. The station roof looks very impressive...right up there with the Lime street model, and the Bath stone is captured to perfection. I love it.

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That is a beautiful piece of work by any standard Jerry.

I can't imagine what it must be like to have the patience and skill to achieve that, there is so much of it too.

Amazing.

Well done, in the circumstances, seems more than a tad inadequate.

I look forward to seeing some nice red engines simmering away under that roof before too long....

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A fabulous piece of craftsmanship, take a bow sir.

Dave.

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Just superb Jerry. BTW how are you planning to make the columns, castings?

Don

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Thanks all.

Chris, I'm looking forward to seeing some nice red engines under the roof as well - but also some blue ones!

Don, the columns are indeed castings. The master was done years ago when I built the original roof and Graham Hughes cast them (no idea what happened to him or his much missed kits).

 

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post-1074-0-14556500-1343554194_thumb.jpg

 

Jerry

Edited by queensquare
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Hi Jerry,

 

Looking good. superb work on Bath 'Green park/square' station. The photos of the real thing remind me of my visit last year (April-May) when we visited the station. Shame that its a car park now, but at least its still standing.

 

Looking forward to seeing more progress.

 

Mark in OZ

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Jerry,

Having just joined RM web i have been browsing the topics and having heard you talking about the layout at the gas cupboard nites I am VERY impressed even though im trying to get going in 4mmP4. keep up the good work, it inspires lots of us whatever scale we choose to work in

 

Regarsd

Dave Harris

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On the other side of Bath the 'other ' railway had a station so, in order to show some level of impartiality, I thought I ought to have a few of their road vehicles out on the city streets. The two lorries are heavily kitbashed whilst the dray is scratchbuilt.

 

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post-1074-0-95186800-1346361658_thumb.jpg

 

Jerry

Edited by queensquare
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Did you have to get special dispensation? Nice modelling I would be interested to know the starting points for the vans. Also would any drays still be in use during the late fifties?

Don

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Thanks Don,

the Thornycroft is a plastic kit, Dornaplas I think. I backdated it by extending the bonnet and radiator, substituting some spoked wheels (origin unknown) and adding various other details. Its done from a photo so I've no idea how accurate it is.

The other lorry is an attempt at one of the GWR AEC 3.5 ton lorries. Its again from photos so is approximate. The bonnet I think is hacked from a Langley Daimler and the rest is plasticard.

As for drays in the late 50's, I don't know about railway owned ones but there would certainly have been others. Think of Steptoe and son - 1960's?

 

Jerry

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Think of Steptoe and son - 1960's?

 

you...dirty...old...man :laugh:

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Thanks Jerry. I certainly remember horse drawn vehicles. I can rember regularly seeing coal being deliverd by a dray but cannot remember seeing a railway owned one but possibly in more rural areas they were still in use.

Don

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The two traction engines are detailed and modified kits, Scalelink I think. I like traction engines and have built a fair few now. I was inspired to put pictures of a couple up following a great day out at the Dorset steam fair yesterday.

 

Exquisite Jerry! Your 2mm traction engines are a delight, but appear to be quite different from each other (different boiler, cylinder and wheels). Were these based on the same Scalelink kit?

 

Can't help you with a Foden steam lorry - scratchbuilding seems to be the only option. But I particularly like steam road rollers, and the sight of one of these towing a living van and bowser would make a nice cameo on Queen Square. I think Scalelink already offer a road roller and living van kits. (Hint, hint, Jerry!)

 

And your vegetable patch seems to be based on a prototype very close to home... Well observed Mr Good!

Edited by Phil Copleston

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Just for you Phil :sungum:

post-1074-0-86651700-1346588626_thumb.jpg

 

post-1074-0-36723700-1346588664_thumb.jpg

 

I have got a living van but not a bowser - you're right, it would make a nice little cameo.

 

As for the origins of the castings you are almost certainly right. Not sure who else makes a traction engine, I think Fleetline do one so some of the bits could well have come from them. I tend to buy them, along with other road vehicles, in those wonderful rummage boxes of bits you see at shows - usually stuck together with chewing gum and painted with a toothebrush. The castings on most N/2mm road vehicles are often very crude so I'm reluctant to buy complete kits only to throw half of them away.

 

I will build a Foden soon but my next road vehicle will be one of the traction engines with a crane mounted on the front for the timber yard on Tucking Mill.

 

Jerry

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Thanks Jerry! Nice roller, looks like an Aveling http://en.wikipedia....k_-_1342806.jpg

 

Good point about rummage boxes at shows, I do exactly the same. Amazing what you can find, and usually cheap too. My personal challenge is to try and find something suitable for S scale - and I often do, such as road vehicles or human figures. But my best 'cop' yet was a complete S scale etched loco kit (a test etch lurking under one of the 4mm manufacturer's stands) revealed after an idle inquiry at Scaleforum a few years ago, and all for 15 quid! Who'da thought it...

 

BTW, don't forget to water your onions :derisive:

Edited by Phil Copleston
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Well I can only repeat what all the other's have already stated ' brilliant'. When you have got your senses back and the burns on your fingers have healed fancy doing the train shed at Chester Nothergate , Nice and easy 4mm with straight roof construction

he eh

Very impressive will follow this tread with admiration

Martin :senile:

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I'm afraid to say that there isn't a hope that I am going to finish the roof in the next five days which is a shame although the impetus provided by a deadline did result in my getting much further with it than I would have done otherwise. Many thanks to all those who have provided encouragement and said such kind things.

 

Jerry

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