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Jamiel

Ellerby - 4mm, buildings, rolling stock, scratch & kit building.

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I have started on the tender. I uscrewed what would unsecrew, and then the top half unclips from the bottom.

The upper part is made of the sides and the top (coal, and flat area with the water filler). The two were either glued, or very tightly together. I started to drill through the coal, and only when I had made a few holes did it become apparent this was a separate bit. I once I had driller holes, I cut off manged to prise off most of the coal. Underneath was a flat surfact which had to be cut off with a Dremmell, and then the sides of that sanded with that again. Unfortunately the chuck grip for the Dremmel was the same distance from teh far side as the other side of teh tender, so that made a few small indents into the edge I wanted to keep. I finished off with hand files.

Crosti08.jpg

10 thou strips were cut to repair the inside of that edge, and Humbrol filler used outside that. 30 thuo platicard was used to then fashion the inside of the tender.

Crosti09.jpg

Sanded and filed down once dry.

Crosti10.jpg

I have also made a start cutting out the join between the steps and the frame of the tender. The plastic this is moulded from is very tough, and I have had to use the Dremmell again. It still needs filing, sanding to remove the melted plastic residue this creates, but it was time to set off fireworks for my four year old daughter.

I need to add lamp irons, the water control handles at the back of the cab area, remove the late crests, paint, add coal, and possibly a few other details.

More soon.

Jamie

Crosti11.jpg

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A little more work on the Crosti 9F.

I ended up raiding a Dapol tanker kit for the brake blocks, and I put them on with a strip which can be unscrewed, but it has flexed a little so I might need to even up a couple of the pairs of brakes. I cut the cross bars from the two detailing kits I bought, drilled  holes on the blocks, and they fit perfectly, with a little Mek to hold them. I am not going to attempt the sand pipes. I also added the tiny box I have seen on the underside of the chimney in some photos, a wire need to go there too. I have taken off the smoke deflector and filed the edges much thinner, it will be fitted back after initial painting.

Crosti15.jpg

Details added to the tender, handles from brass, brass lamp irons, and a handle on the water filler. There is also a very little detail added on the underside and the buffer beam parts put on, and I drilled out the coal hatch to add a little coal in there. Some braces on the center panel in the tender needed and tiny strip on the top of it.

Crosti16.jpg

A few views of the whole thing as it stands. Sorry for the quality of the photos a bit murky today.
Crosti12.jpg

Crosti13.jpg

Crosti14.jpg

I feel it is getting close to being painted. Some archers rivet transfers to add (dying to try these as I will then add some to the face of my P2 if they look good).

Jamie

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Still on the Crosti 9F. When using the Dremmel to cut the steps away from the frame I caught the buffer and cut a a dent out of it. I got the soldering iron and filled it with solder, but then thought I might make some nice muck built up on the buffers using solder as a base for it. Too late, I had heated the metal buffer too much, and it melted the plastic base of the buffer. I tried to patch it, but in the end cut what was there away. I have a Dapol Stndard Mogul kit that I use as a source of bit to raid (well worth getting if you do a lot of enhancing of models - some of the parts even made the air vents in the good warehouse on pages 3 and 4 of this thread). Anyway, I cut one of the buffers in half and fitted around the metal base. It isn't sprung any more, but at least I managed to make it look OK again.

Crosti20.jpg

Apart from that setback, the rest is progressing well. A little more detailing in the tender inside, and starting to paint it, plus removing the late BR logos. Coal and new transfers next.
Crosti18.jpg

The loco had had a first coat of black too, but back in two separate parts at the moment. The filed thinner smoke deflector has also had a coat of black on the inside.
Crosti19.jpg

After some airbrush work, I found the wheels were patchy with paint. I presume the method I use is the same as others after airbrushing and weathering, I ran the body, and got a cotton bud dipped in white spirit, and held it against the wheel rims to clean them. Do others have a better method?

Rivet and renumbering transfer to do next, and I will get a copy of the Hornby magazine to see the article about detailing the Crosti 9F in there to see if it has some nice options I can explore as well.

More soon.

Jamie
 

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Jamie

Looking good but it may have been easier starting with a DJH kit?

 

Baz

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Jamie

Looking good but it may have been easier starting with a DJH kit?

 

Baz

 

Certainly it has been an interesting process, and building the pony truck has given me the confidence to start doing some brass modelling. I have a Comet kit of a LMS inspection saloon coach (buying that was no doubt what triggered the release of the RTR ones) which I think I feel ready to tackle now.

 

I was thinking a J50 would be a good start with modelling a brass loco, but Hornby have beaten me there. I will definitely look to build a brass loco from scratch before long.

 

There are some wagons to finish off after this, and then I have a couple of conversions lined up. Class 21 diesel and a Bullied 10201(-3)  Diesel for which I have parts/kits, and am not prepared to wait for Dapol and Kernow, plus they will be my own versions.

 

I did the Craftsman conversion to a Class 128 DMU, which could do with having the side door revisited, but I do prefer the cabs to the Heljan model.

 

I also have had some parts to make a Prototype HST(Genesis, etc), which I see has now been announced in N gauge, so as with the LMS inspection saloon, I suspect that will be announced in OO gauge by the time I make it.

 

Still the point of detailing, converting or building is the enjoyment of making the model, so lovely as the RTR ones are they won't have that, so I will have to pick a loco to model soon.

 

Jamie

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If you want to scratch-build (or partially scratch-build using parts from other sources) a fairly modern locomotive that nobody is going to bring out RTR, I suggest the Fell 4-8-4 (or 4-4-4-4) diesel-mechanical locomotive.

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If you want to scratch-build (or partially scratch-build using parts from other sources) a fairly modern locomotive that nobody is going to bring out RTR, I suggest the Fell 4-8-4 (or 4-4-4-4) diesel-mechanical locomotive.

I think that I am probably a barometer of obvious choices for future releases by the big manufacturers, but the Fell and the GT3 are probably just a bit beyond my tastes. A kit for an Austin 7F (if Alan Gibson make a new batch) would be at the top of my list, so would be 10800 and a L.N.E.R. Y11 - or garden shed with wheels.

 

When I get the skill to build it, I would like a WD 2-10-0, they very occasionally made it as far south as Leeds, and also a Caprotti Black 5 (the Comet kit is very tempting, maybe for Christmas), and especially the last two Ivatt Black 5's (see the top of the previous page, I think they are stunning locos, but I know a lot of people find them plain ugly).

 

Perhaps as an extra tick to the wishlist poll this month, there should be a don't make these as I have just built one option.

 

Jamie

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Tiny bit of progress today, too cold to do much more, although I might be tempted to nip out and start a first layer of weathering on the chassis later.

I have tried out some Archers rivet transfers on the cylinders and front running plate. Putting the 6 rivets on the hatch I added was a fuss, to sets of 2, and two single ones. The strips at the edge have too many rivets, it should just be about 6 into total along the whole edge, but after doing the six in the middle, I just wanted to add some detail, and wasn't fussed about them being too many too close. Plus some Comet etched works plates and shed plate (actually 8f plates, but I don't think anyone will notice).

Crosti21.jpg

Crosti22.jpg

A quick airbrush with some matt varnish, and a coat of black.

Crosti24.jpg

Crosti23.jpg

I did try something with the matt varnish that had been suggested on the forum. I bought a cheap wire brush for the Dremmel, opened the tin of matt varnish, gave it a stir, but then put it in a plastic bag with a hole in it to stop spray, and whisked up the varnish, which went milky, and seem to be matt when it dried (daylight will be the test).

I also spray the tender after additional coats of filler had been added to some of the holes at the top edge.

Still to do:
paint the backplate of the cab's details.
paint the cab inside roof cream.
add the last number to the cab side numbers  (92026 I think it will be).
I am waiting to hear back about smokebox etched numbers from cgwnameplates.co.uk - I gave up on 247 developments (hope Gary is too busy and not unwell).
add driver and fireman.
maybe add wire rails at the back of the cab
weathering and coal.

After making the Comet pony truck, I am definitely interested in doing some brass modelling. I have a Comet LMS Inspection saloon kit, and I think I should start that, and then if the goes O.K I am very tempted to try the Comet kit for the Caprotti Black 5.

I must also finish the signal box, and wagons in progress and when it is too cold to go outside I am starting to draw up plans for my station building.

Mostly I am finding having two jobs and a family is leaving very little time for modelling at the moment, hopefully over the Christmas break I can catch up and make some progress.

Jamie


 

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Weathering has started on the Crosti, as well as transfers for the number (6 only) and the tender logo. Using pressfix, which I am starting to get the hang of. The 6 showed as slightly lighter, and maybe a tad thicker, but the weathering helps sit them in.

Using the same method I used on the Dogfish. First a little matte black was sprayed on the etches added after the first paint, then a dusting all over with slate grey (Humbrol 31). Then after a day's drying, dry brushing with rust, light stone, white and black all mixed roughly to keep the colours changing. I have only done the chassis and body, not the tender with the tender with the dry brushing. I also ran a little thinner here and there, and also cleaned back the cab windows with thinner and a cotton bud. I did the same when I felt the weathering was too much.

Sorry for the quality of the photos, there isn't a great deal of light in the shed at the moment.

Crosti25.jpg

After the dry brushing had dried overnight, a thin coat of black to soften the dry brushing. I also did a coat of black and then grey on the tender, and then more grey to sit back the logo, which always seemed to be hardly visible on the real 9Fs. I also did a tiny bit of grey on the body front.

Crosti26.jpg

CGW have the smokebox door number plate in stock, so I will get that ordered this week. Just to put it together now, a little dry brushing on the details and tender.

Coal to add, the work inside the cab, not sure about adding the cab rails, may give it a quick try.

I have found that there is so much sideways play in the drive wheels that they can catch on the brake rigging if I don't center them before running. I will keep an eye on that.

Still pretty happy with how it is progressing, even if progress has been slow.

Jamie

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Guest bri.s

That looks a very nice weathering job ,the costi looks great well done

 

Brian

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Jamie, your crosti is looking really good, I would not bother to paint the cab roof cream. I believe they may have been that curious brown that the LMR used for its cab interiors or just plain black. All the 9f"s I ever fired the cabs were pretty dirty inside. So when I prepped a loco I used to pour oil from the oil can over the boiler back in the cab let it run down everywhere then when I had finished doing dirty stuff get the prep pipe and wash the whole cab inside, over the boiler back, roof as well! You stood in the gangway to do this or get soaked  but finished up with a nice clean footplate and a shiny boiler back. All dry by the time you made the tea and a happy clean driver,always a good thing! 9f"s best engines ever, except the rebuilt crosti"s which were dogs.

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Thanks Mike.

I had already painted the cab inside roof, but with a thin wash of LMS cream.

A few quick photos. Maybe I will add another thin coat from the airbrush when it is daylight to tone done the weathering just a tad. Still to order the front smokebox door number plate from CGW.

Crosti27.jpg

Crosti28.jpg

Crosti29.jpg

Crosti30.jpg

Crosti31.jpg

Must rush, but will post more info later.

Jamie

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A good week for researching my station building. I spent the morning at the National Railway Museum. where I got to see original plans for the Midland Railway Finchley Road Station, built when the St. Albans to St.Pancras line was made. I can't share those photos due to copyright, but I will share my plans for the building I derive from them.

I also got a couple of books about that Mainland Line, and one, 'The London Extension of the Midland Railway. St.Pancras to Bedford' by Geoff Goslin, has a pretty good photo of the Hendon Station building, which is the same design as Finchley Road station. I now have plenty of information to start seriously designing the main station building. These particular stations are of interest as they are entered from a bridge over the railway as I want with Ellerby, and are also a Midland design.

Hendon01.jpg

Disused stations also has some details on the station too.
http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/f/finchley_road/

I will also have to start working out what etches I will need for windows, and I gather that Geoff Smith is scaling back his line, so if he does not have the sizes I am looking for I may have to do some research elsewhere.

Jamie

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Hi Jamie,

Just been catching up on your Crosti. What can I say but superb, makes me wish I never sold my Hornby 9f last year.

 

Cheers Peter.

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Well plans to do some modelling, and to start my Comet coach kit (first serious brass modelling, building up to a loco I hope) went west on the first day of the holiday when my back went again. So virtually no modelling.

 

I could sit at the computer for some periods, so I worked on the photos of the plans of the Midland Finchley Road Station and have come up with the following plans as the basis for my main station building. It will use some Wills arches, and if I have worked things out right (and they are still available) some GT window and door etches. Hopefully GT will also have the canopy etches still available, as they would fit the station well.

Due to space only some of the back buildings are going to be made to match, as the engine shed will impinge on some of the area, so I have made steps down to where that will be.

I have yet to see a place where I can fit in a goods lift which I think would be essential to such a valley station, perhaps to the back of the building and front of the shed where there is a small space.

I haven’t done the bridge and side passage designs yet to fit this, and I also need to properly draw a plan view (above), and to show the hidden parts, some of which are currently in light grey.

Here are the plans as they currently stand.

EllerbyFront01.jpg

EllerbyPlatSide01.jpg

EllerbyBack01.jpg

EllerbyOppSide01.jpg

A little sourcing of parts, but hopefully I can make a start on this soon.

Jamie

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You don't do things by half, do you? (As if I can talk..... :))

 

The Crosti looks fantastic, as do the plans for the station. Remind me, are you going for handbuilt track as I bet my bottom dollar that you wouldn't find it's construction too much of a challenge.

 

Cheers,

 

J.

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You don't do things by half, do you? (As if I can talk..... :))

 

The Crosti looks fantastic, as do the plans for the station. Remind me, are you going for handbuilt track as I bet my bottom dollar that you wouldn't find it's construction too much of a challenge.

 

Cheers,

 

J.

HI Jason, thank you for the encouragement, I was very tempted, the main problem is time. It took over two months to do the detailing on the Crosti, and now I have two jobs (both of which need to have extra hours put in) I thought that starting to build C&L track (or similar) would mean it would be months before I could make any more progress on the rest of the layout.

 

After seeing how quite a few people have cut and shaped Peco points, I think I can achieve the gentle curve through the 'north' end of the station with that method, and last week I ordered the track/points I need. I am sticking with Peco flexi track, with the sleepers spaced out as well, it doesn't look as beautiful as C&L, but will remain consistent through the layout. Also with the heavy inner city ballasting (think Leeds stations 1950's) I am going for, most of the sleepers are hidden under ballast (a mixture of ballast and Das clay).

 

All of that plus all the other things I have planned - Honrby Class 29 detailed to a 21 with a Bachmann 24 chassis, Silver Fox Bullied Diesel, Comet brass LMS Inspection coach, masses of detailing to do to locos, DMUs, a fleet of wagons to build and complete, all the buildings (which is possibly my favourite part of modelling), the track was a luxury too much.

 

I did consider paying someone to build it, but that seemed like cheating.

 

On the plus side, I have a week of leave plus days in lieu to take before the end of February, so maybe a week of modelling is on the cards.

 

Jamie

 

Edited by Jamiel

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Just a quick update, 8 Dapol Class B tankers detailed with the RT Models etches, and under-frames as on the previous page, ready for painting, transfers and weathering. Another 8 or so to follow, but I am not going to get stuck in making all of them before having the fun of painting and weathering like I did with the Presflos (still in progress, slowly). Once the others are done, I think they will make a nice rake to go behind the Crosti 9F.

Sat behind a Rail Exclusive Class 24 (with sound), not run yet, but hopefully this weekend. Bachmann Class 24 just to the right, which doesn't look bad next to the Rail Exclusive one. Despite all the complaints about the etched grill on the Rail Exclusive, it is the thing that from a medium view, stands out as an improvement over the Bachmann. Close up it does have the edge though, but I am not binning my Bachmann 24's, they are not bad, for the money anyway.

Sorry for the split focus photo, not a lot of light in there for photography.

Tanker09.jpg

It felt good to get back in the shed modelling again, even if I am frozen solid by the end of it.

Jamie

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A little update. The first 8 of the Dapol tankers are now in the middle of weathering.

I did a little experimenting with the painting on these. Matt black just looked too flat for oil tankers, I did one, but then sprayed matt varnish on it, still not right. The others were sprayed with silk black (Humbrol), and a quick pass over the first one with that. They then had the transfers added.

Then a light pass with matt black. From Martyn Welsh's Weathing book, I tried one with a pass of gun metal and leather, not good, way too sparkly. I then mixed a dark grey and brick red and gave them a pass with that, mostly spraying upwards to get a sprayed up track dirt. I then wiped them with thinner on a cotton bud, and also then dabbed thinner down from the top.

After leaving them overnight, I mixed silk black, a little dark grey, and a lot of thinners and dabbed an oily pass around the middle.

I think this is about half way through the weathering process, vertical wipes and streak with a dry brush of a grey/brown/white mix soon, and then more layers of airbrush. I have also realised that I need to fill the holes in the solebars where the Dapol ladders should have gone.

A few pics to show progress.

Tanker10.jpg

Tanker11.jpg

Tanker12.jpg

Tanker13.jpg

Tanker14.jpg

Sorry still a bit dark in there to get good photos, and the down side of such a big shed, just too big to heat, so damn cold in there the last two nights. When we move and buy a place, it will be disassembled, and then rebuilt with a little more insulation and near the house with a storage heater in there. But for now, it is cold.

More soon.

Jamie

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More work on the tankers. Dry brushing with a grey and black mix with a medium sized flat ended brush I have also used for pushing in Das and ballast t the track, so the end is quite rough.

Tanker15.jpg

Tanker16.jpg

Tanker17.jpg

Left overnight then working over with the same paints, but wetter and with a thinner brush to blend it all. It is a subtle change, but does improve it a lot.

Tanker18.jpg

Tanker19.jpg

Tanker20.jpg

Left again to dry. I was going to give them a very quick airbrush dusting with a thin black, but my airbrush isn't well. It had an overnight soak in White Spirit, but the end isn't clear, so it is now soaking overnight in airbrush cleaner. It might just have lived out its life, so if it doesn't work after that, I think I might have to get a replacement. Still I have the compressor which is the expensive bit, and I could keep this one for spares (I would get another Iawata Eclipse). They will then have another track dirt, and final brushing to even out the oil spill and any other bits, also some rust dry brushed on the under-frames, and I still have to fill those holes in the solebars on most of them, probably with the lugs from the Dapol ladders, I think that would be easier than filler.

As for new things, poor photo I know, the sun went in, but my valentines present, a Hornby J50.
J50_image01.jpg

And while the sun was out I grabbed another photo of the Crosti 9F. The photos do make it look more heavily weathered than it appears to the eye.

Crosti33.jpg

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Just one more photo of the Crosti 9F, this gives a better idea of how it looks to the eye. I missed this one when posting earlier.

Crosti34.jpg

Jamie

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Wow, a week since my last update. I have done a fair bit, but most of it invisible, or at least not visible in conditions I can photograph.

Firstly, after a quick chat with the people at Graphic Air, I did not need a new airbrush, just a new nozzle, so £90 saved there. £16 o there abouts for a new nozzle, and boy what a difference it made to the airbrush. You get used to things as they get blocked, rather like how you adjust to a clutch rising in the car, but having a new nozzle my airbrush has come back to life with a huge amount of control over pressure and spray.

More layers were done on the Dapol class B tankers, but I didn't do any photos in the daylight, so nothing to show here, see the third photo below and you will see what I mean.

I also did a tiny bit more on the Crosti 9F, evening out the weathering on the front, coal in the hole/small door where the fireman gets it out of the tender, and a little more coal to even out the top of the tender, all too dark to photograph as well. It is almost done, I still haven't got the front number plate, must sort that out soon.

As for something I can show, I bought two Slaters rectangular tank wagons (tar) from Ebay late last year. I like to build wagons, but I thought they looked a bit better than the Dapol ones (maybe prejudice). Only one had wheels, I did get some at a show a while ago, but they a re a bit big (1mm too much probably). I must try Alan Gibson at the York show next month. I can say that I have never heard of 'Maygib' before, but those are the wheels I have used on the first wagon.

RectTank01.jpg

Quite an easy kit to put together, although a little more instructions would have helped in showing how the frame fitted around the tank, and what was meant to overlap and not. I have just done the first of the two.

RectTank02.jpg

It is a kit that it probably doesn't matter if you spill a bit of Mek, as it all adds to the tar build up. I have put a bar between the brake shoes on either side, and ones between the brake handles and the V hangers one each side. Should there also be one right across between the V hangers and the two handles as well?

I still need to add the loops around the brake hangers cross bars, and I will also add the straps that are often seen over the tanks one these as well. Below it is sat between the new J50and one of the Dapol tankers, showing how little light there is for shooting anything black in there.

RectTank03.jpg

Off to bed, early start to get to my job lecturing tomorrow, and then I suspect a busy week on films I am working on. Maybe a chance to get a couple of days off next week though, which I can use just for modelling.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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My rectangular tank now has a friend to keep it company. Nice kits to make. I have added brake hangers and cross bars underneath, and a couple of straps up top.

It is a kit that I wasn't too worried about spilling Mek on as I was making it, as they were filthy layered with tar things, so it is all part of the weathering process.

RectTank04.jpg

In the background you can also see a beer bottle top. I have found these really good for dipping water slide transfers in, as they are not so big that they can get lost, especially for the tiny ones, or individual letters on the Presflo's.

Jamie

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Guest bri.s

Nice looking little wagons ,I've started wagon kit building ,it gets quite addictive

 

Brian

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Like the 9F looks very vey grubby and ill used pounding up and down the main line saw them regularily and enjoyed ,if the shed is to cold do what I did ,my electric man fitted a green house heater and boy does it get warm after half an hour I have to turn it off for a while.

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