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Jamiel

Ellerby - 4mm, buildings, rolling stock, scratch & kit building.

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Buffer beam before painting, I added step (I presume) to buffer tops from the metal sprue from the RT kits lamp irons. Three of the our sprung buffers work OK,the fourth just won't budge, probably a bit of stray glue I suspect.

Bullied64.jpg

 

Ar horn fashioned from 0.3mm wire and bras hand rail brackets from the Comet 9F detailing kit. A bit oversize compared to the prototype, but they have the right feel for me. Had I done 10203 I could have used horns like the Midland Twins have, but the side grills are for the first two, and I really like the door on the front, more of my obsession with brutal looking engines. Hand rails also being added, Shawplan class 44 hand rails cut to size, very fiddly, especially the ones I soldered wire to to mount them.

Bullied65.jpg

All the hand rails done, wire for the small side ones, and the Shawplan 44 rails around the cabs. They are mostly staying on, but some are a bit delicate. Maybe a could will be replaced with fine flat wire in the long run. Also a start on the transfers, boy are the 5F, 5P tiny, and fiddly. I have done one side so far, and am letting it dry before starting the other. I think it took about 90 minutes to get the transfers you can see done.

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I have dabbed a little matt varnish on to the transfers to hold them firm after this photo was taken.

Here is the body sitting on a partially painted chassis. Sorry for the exposure, not a lot of light in there tonight. My Class 21 is sitting behind, having had a light dusting of weathering, but still waiting for its windscreen wipers.

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Getting there, I think the front of the chassis may need cutting back a little to allow the cab interiors to fit on, and I will have to see where I can get some weight into the loco as it is very light.

Jamie

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All the transfers done now, and the body sat on the chassis.

Bullied70.jpg

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Cleaning, more painting (roof, bogies), touching up little bits. seeing if I can add some weights inside (not a lot of space with the sound chip and speaker), hiding the cables, and perhaps something to stop seeing through the side grills,  and weathering.

Jamie

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Sorry for the delay in updates. I made some videos of the Bullied diesel running with my I-phone, but most were pretty poor. I had done more painting/weathering on it.

I don't know how to link videos, so here is the URL to a mov/Quickltime I have put on my website.

http://www.jamielochhead.co.uk/jpegs/Trains/Bullied15.MOV
 

For the money the TTS sound is quite good, but when compared with the Sutton Works Class 24, it is rather put to shame, still I wouldn't cut up a £250 loco to build a kit on top of it!

Here are a couple of not very well lit photos as well.
 

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I have also done some work on the coach behind. a Bachmann MK1, de-ribbling the roof, adding some passengers, weathering, and a little rubbing with T-cut to take that very matt finsish off it (from a suggestion in one of Tony Wright's threads. CORRECTION it was from one of Michael Delamar's threads).

I have also made another Comet front pony truck, with Alan Gibson wheels, and a panel from a Brassmasters etch for some extra detailing, plus some guitar wire. As this will go behind a AWS plate, I haven't bothered with the top cross spring. This is for one of my two Ivatt 4MTs, but I will also make these for all my BR Standards, and anything else that they will improve. I really like the robust feel of the Comet etches, and the ease with which they go together.

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Any advice on posting/linking videos properly would be gratefully received. I really msut get on with my station building soon as well, these locos I have been making really do need somewhere they can run other than a bare loop.

Al the best.

Jamie

 

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Sorry for the lack of updates, work and my partner's birthday got ahead of me. She had a great time, as did our daughter, but now back to the trains.

A couple more shots of the front pony trucks for the Ivatt 4MTs. Comet truck at the top, bits of a Brassmasters etch chopped off to add a little extra detail. The right one has been filed back to make them fit OO Gauge, the left shows the untouched EM/P4 width of the Brassmasters etch. Alan Gibson wheels for the truck.

Ivatt03.jpg

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I have made a start on the main station building at last. 2mm ply for a strong base. The etches I am using are a mixture of GT Etches and Scalelink, plus a few Churchward if they are needed. The ply has been cut with a Stanley knife, which blunts the blades quickly, but does allow for accurate cuts. Curves sanded out with the Dremmell. I have cut them a bit oversize to allow detailing and filling with plasticard and brick papers as on the last building I didn't feel I had left enough space to fit details and etches easily in place.

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With this building which sits on the edge of a bridge I do have to decide how much of what is around the building I build straight on to the building itself. The front pavement will help support the portcio, but beyond that I have to think about where to stop.

Jamie

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Gluing, screwing, clamping and weighting to make the main 'box' of the station building as strong as possible. It is just too wide for my biggest G clamp, and my extendable vice bends the plywood too easily at this stage, so the drill makes a good weight to let it set over night.

StnMain04.jpg

Dying to get on with adding the bricks, but I want to get a solid base of wood to work on for the different sections that make up the main station buildings.

Time to catch up on the cricket highlights before bed.


Jamie

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Hi Jamie,

 

I honestly don't know why I haven't seen your thread before, but I have really enjoyed catching up with it. Your building skills are truly inspirational, and every new page seems to impress me more than the last!

 

Blimey!

 

Regards

 

Trev :)

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Thanks Big T.

Every so often I glance at my notifications and see someone has ticked a few posts and it always is inspiring to get back on with some modelling.

I might have gone under your radar as I am probably one of the slowest model builders on the forum. Glad you like the models.

Jamie

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More photos as the plywood base for the main station building progresses. When placed in situ on the layout I found I needed a little more height, but that was fairly easily achieved as the second lower levels were added. I have to adjust the stairs down a little, but other than that it is all going together pretty well. I have left off a few pieces so that I can put some details inside, or in the portico before adding more walls. I am also toying with building the near side of the bridge the station sits on as part of this building, so it is all seamless.

StnMain05.jpg

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StnMain07.jpg

Jamie

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A few more photos of the wooden base for the main station building. Two panels have been added to the stairs down to the platform.

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A few photos in situ, the track at the back of the building will be cut back just a little, as it was only roughly laid anyway.

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Off to Whitby and the Yorkshire coast for the day with the family. Might get chance to start the brickwork this evening.

Jamie

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Brickwork under way, or perhaps 'cladding' might be more accurate. I am using Southeast Finecast bricks (Flemish Bond) for the first time, it will be interesting to see how it compares with Slaters, it has a nicer emboss, but doesn't have the thickness I am used to working with to create decorative brick work. I have both so can use each type as fits. The arches are Wills as always, these ones cut down and separated between the two layers. The steps at the back and cut down from a Dapol footbridge that I am planning to sue for parts now (not fine enough detail for what I want, but still some nice parts to plunder).

 

The stone lintels and ledges are Evergreen plastic strip, filed (Dremmel and then hand file) to create the top arches.

I am not worried about marrying the brick work at the corners as there will be a decorative course at the corners, and also the top. The front will have a stone course for decoration as well.

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Really enjoying getting back to doing buildings, I think it is what I am best at.

Jamie

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I keep coming back to this thread very good modelling

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Thanks RKA, glad the thread is interesting to follow.

A little portico detailing on the inside. I need to do a bit of this, and paint it before I can add the outside and pavement as I won't be able to reach the inside then. The window etches have been painted, and then glazed. Plasticard and brick 'card', then a first coat of Humbrol 70. Hopefully another coat before I go to bed later as well. The ceiling will be the same mix of white and Midland building cream I used on the window frames, maybe a tad darker.

StnMain19.jpg

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Jamie

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Really enjoying getting back to doing buildings, I think it is what I am best at.

 

 

 

Don't sell yourself short Jamie, you've made a pretty fine job of everything you've touched on here so far!

 

There's some really great modelling on this thread, and a whole range of techniques which we can all learn from.

 

Al.

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Thanks Al.

I do feel most comfortable making buildings despite the other modelling. Perhaps it is not having to worry that they will derail on points!

One thing I really like about RMweb is the sharing of skills, ideas, and of course the encouragement people give each other.

It is especially rewarding when someone who has made something you admire (like your footbridge and station buildings for Bakewell - http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/64977-bakewell-peak-district-line-br-layout-views/page-28#entry1197814     (p 28 especially - but it won't link for some reason) gives you encouragement.

 

Thanks to everyone who has contributed, or ticked the feedback boxes on the thread.

Anyway, time for another coat of brick Humbrol 70 before retiring.

Jamie

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More brickwork and lintels.

I don't worry too much about how accurately the plywood is cut as the brick sheet will makes the edges in much more detail, and it gives me space to fill in behind so that etches and glass fit better anyway.

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I have reworked the windows slightly to allow for available etches as the build has gone ahead, the brick sheet is cut much more accurately.

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Glued with Evostick solvent free (is this any different to Copydex?), still ti works well and forms a very solid laminate when dry of plastic and plywood.

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Evergreen strip is files away with the Dremmel and files, then more smoothly once in position.

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The first and second stories almost covered with the first layer and lintels in position.

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I have cut the bricks for the stirs side, but need to add a door and possibly some windows. The protruding rectangular building at the top left needs some interior before being glued together, and the ticket hall needs the interior making too, but I an probably do more on the outside first.

I am finding that Souteast Finecast brick sheets have a very smooth/glossy surface that using my method of layers of paint, wiping and dry-brushing doesn't work as well as the rougher and more pliable Slater sheets. I am tempted to rub it all over with some Wet and Dry before painting, and possibly using primer before the first coat. I may do some experiments on some off-cuts before main painting.

Cutting the main stairs from 2mm plasticard is one of eh next jobs, I think it will take a bit of time, but once done will make the building really start to feel as though the first stage is done.

Right Sunday evening, time for a beer and maybe a movie.

Thanks for all the encouragement, likes and other ticks, hope you are all having a good bank holiday weekend.

Jamie

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An afternoon making an interior for the stairs building. Not sure how much will actually be seen, but I will put a light in there so maybe.

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Done while catching up on yesterdays cricket semi-final while doing it, sadly Tim Bresnan couldn't quite bring Yorkshire through, but a good match.

Anyway, off to paint this so it can be put in, and the two other walls of the building put on.

Jamie

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A quick update.

I am not bothering too much about fine detail on the stairs interior as it will be hard to see in. This is just the first coat though.

StnMain33.jpg

I cut the window side recesses from the pieces cut out to make the windows in the first place. There is always more than enough of these offcuts.

 

StnMain34.jpg

 

Stone inlays into the brickwork, and decorative brick layers started, but still lots to go. This building doesn't have as much fine brick detail as the goods building, but the stone I think will give it more of an impressive feel, plus the portico will be much more decorative than the rest of the building.

 

StnMain35.jpg

 

A Smiths (Wizard Models) 1950s style grate set into the paving slabs at the back of the building, on the raised section. I may overdone the slope/canber on the paving to run down to the grate.

 

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After reading through some interesting threads on the forum, I discovered that possibly my favourite model building I have seen on a layout is not scratch built, but a repaint of a Kibri model. The Yorkshire Bank building on the wonderful Wibdenshaw layout, see http://www.emgauge70s.co.uk/ , also the same for some of the factories on Shenston Road  http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/85490-on-shenston-road-from-the-lineside/

So if the very best use Kibri models, I have decided to join them and have ordered Kibri 38294 Corner Terrace House

http://www.viessmann-modell.com/kibri/index.php?show=shop&search=true&cPath=&cat=&lang=de

I plan to do a bit of bashing to give it an individual feel, but am looking forward to it arriving. I may also look into getting s casting kit to make windows for the above model, and also to extend the Kibri kit if I wish to most just windows I expect).

Jamie

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A day off work today and was home to receive the Kibri kit I ordered, but in the meantime an afternoon working on the station building.

StnMain41.jpg

I am going to bash this kit quite a bit and think duplicating a few bits might be a good idea to extend it. I am going to ditch the wizard's hat on the corner though.

Even with just a little work and good painting the kits can be made into something really good. From www.emgauge70s.co.uk in Layouts/Wibdenshaw by Keir Hardy, one of the most inspiring layouts I have seen.

wibdenshaw_class03-99.jpg

Jamie

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Making the main steps. 2mm plasticard strips cut and Mek's together.

StnMain42.jpg

Clipped to a metal ruler and the edges filed flat with the Dremmel and files.

 

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Strips glued on to the back and clamped flat.

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The steps and covering marked out and cut as necessary.

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A piece of card cut to size and marked up for the big back windows.

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Strips of plasticard cut, glued and filed to shape. I have cut some of the sprue for Wills windows I have as it has the right shape to make the angled part which you can see at the bottom.

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Put together.

 

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One in place.

 

StnMain49.jpg

Hope to get a little more done before I retire tonight.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Making the main steps. 2mm plasticard strips cut and Mek's together.

 

StnMain42.jpg

 

Clipped to a metal ruler and the edges filed flat with the Dremmel and files.

 

StnMain43.jpg

 

Strips glued on to the back and clamped flat.

 

StnMain44.jpg

 

The steps and covering marked out and cut as necessary.

 

StnMain45.jpg

 

A piece of card cut to size and marked up for the big back windows.

 

StnMain46.jpg

 

Strips of plasticard cut, glued and filed to shape. I have cut some of the sprue for Wills windows I have as it has the right shape to make the angled part which you can see at the bottom.

 

StnMain47.jpg

 

Put together.

 

StnMain48.jpg

 

One in place.

 

StnMain49.jpg

 

Hope to get a little more done before I retire tonight.

 

Jamie

 

Great way of doing the steps, hadn't thought of doing it that way. I must try it some time, as it looks like it would be easier than cutting notches out of the edge pieces, and then gluing thin strips onto the notches.

 

The buildings are looking great!

 

Look forward to more

 

Peter

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Thanks Peter.

Making the stairs that way worked pretty well but there are a couple of things I needed to do. I cut them slightly over width, and didn't worry that they all matched exactly, this was because I wanted to glue them together quickly to get the overall drop on the stairs, and not worry too much about the edge being straight.

When  dry I clipped the stairs to a metal ruler and used a Dremmel with a sanding tool and then files to make the edge straight. This all went as planned.

What I should have realised is that with so much Mek/glue/solvent when it dried it would dry differently in the joins between the stairs compared with the open visible part of the stair. When I realised this, fortunately before it had set hard I put the thick backing strips on and left it clamped flat to the metal ruler over night.

I just cut the steps from a sheet of 2mm plasticard, but the straightening strips are from Evergreen strips.

Maybe building the steps in situ on to a holding frame would have given a good result too.

I am sure there are other ways and materials that can be used for steps, it is certainly worth having a look at ACG_MR's thread for his Bakewell (linked in post 339) layout to see what can be done with Plasticard and steps, his footbridge is really inspriring work.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Thanks Peter.

 

Making the stairs that way worked pretty well but there are a couple of things I needed to do. I cut them slightly over width, and didn't worry that they all matched exactly, this was because I wanted to glue them together quickly to get the overall drop on the stairs, and not worry too much about the edge being straight.

 

When  dry I clipped the stairs to a metal ruler and used a Dremmel with a sanding tool and then files to make the edge straight. This all went as planned.

 

What I should have realised is that with so much Mek/glue/solvent when it dried it would dry differently in the joins between the stairs compared with the open visible part of the stair. When I realised this, fortunately before it had set hard I put the thick backing strips on and left it clamped flat to the metal ruler over night.

 

I just cut the steps from a sheet of 2mm plasticard, but the straightening strips are from Evergreen strips.

 

Maybe building the steps in situ on to a holding frame would have given a good result too.

 

I am sure there are other ways and materials that can be used for steps, it is certainly worth having a look at ACG_MR's thread for his Bakewell (linked in post 339) layout to see what can be done with Plasticard and steps, his footbridge is really inspriring work.

 

Jamie

Making the steps in situ is very tedious and takes forever! Especially trying to line them up properly. 

I'll take a look at the Bakewell thread, much to my shame I haven't read it yet (I've heard tons about it though!)

 

Peter

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Guest bri.s

Great work Jamie ,I do like your buildings

 

 

Brian

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When I start a building for the layout I do some research to see what buildings fit the location, period and railway architecture of what I am looking for. Even though it is a fictional station, I want it to fit the needs of a station, especially the buildings. Although tentatively set in South Yorkshire, the water tower is a midland railways building from London (West Ham) and the station building is also from the Midland Railway London extension when St.Pancras was built.

I wanted a station building that sat on a bridge over the railway, like Keithley for instance, but I didn't want a station building as big a Keithley. The Great Central gave some inspiration as did Preston, but when I saw the few pictures available of the Hendon and original Finchely Road stations I knew these had the feel I wanted.

 

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/f/finchley_road/  has a few photos, but not from all the angles I waned, as do the books I have on Midland Railway and LMS architecture. Living near York I contacted the National Railways museum archive and was fortunate to be able to photograph the original -plans they still have for the two stations. They are copyright the museum, so I can not post full photos, but here is the Photoshop Bridge view to show the number of photos I took, and hem being pieced together in Photoshop.

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A quick update from the work done over the weekend, here are some photos, but I didn't realise the time so must rush off. Stairs glued in position, a start on the walkway,Evergreen strip and wood card. I want the walkway to look like it was added later which is why it overlaps the window to give that feeling of an old station having had some work over the years.

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StnMain54.jpgJ

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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