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Jamiel

Ellerby - 4mm, buildings, rolling stock, scratch & kit building.

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Guest bri.s

Like the shot with the 8f and train against the wall quite atmospheric

Didn't mean to rush you getting the engines out lol wish I could keep on one job for a while I'm quite sporadic when it comes to modelling ill do a bit of wiring bit of scenery bit of track laying and like to get a few trains out I've only one track working at the moment but it gives me a sence of what I want love the buildings your doing wish I had the patience and skill to make something like that wouldn't mind some off those retaining walls I need about a 2andhalf foot one on mine I've got the scalescene kit and I've just started the tunnel kit so hopefully it will look alright don't think it'll get near to the tunnel you modelled though

Brian

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No worries Brian, it actually looks better than I thought it might with a loco in there.

 

There are so many fantastic photos on the website, especially of detailed and weathered locos, that I wasn't sure how an out of the box loco would look on the layout, that and the Das clay orange ballast, which hopefully will become more like NER ash ballast when painted.

 

I was also becoming aware that this thread was somewhat lacking in locos, so it spurred me on to take the photos.

 

I do like Scalescenes models, I have bought a few, and although I was tempted into modelling with brick cards, plasticard and thin ply by Geoff Taylor's books (and no I am not on commission,  but yes they really are a great inspiration),  but I do use them now as reference for weathering, and painting the models I make. Their water tower influenced my model a lot. I did make a couple of their kits/PDFs, and they are really enjoyable to make, and the results are really good.

Hope you have fun with the kits you are making.

Jamie 

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Guest bri.s

I would love to have a go at ply and plasticard mabe after I've a bit more experience I do think plasticard looks better that paper and card

I think it's the feel of it

I've just finished my first kit of a tunnel Theresa few pictures in my thread Grange lane junction and sidings any advice would be appreciated

Might have a go at the way your ballasting for my sidings

Brian

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I do hope this isn't blatant advertising, but if you are tempted to scratch build some buildings with brick card, plasticard, etc. then I would strongly suggest having a look at this book:

 

wpf7b0ea7f_05_06.jpg

 

That is what changed me from Scalescens to plasticard, but I still use Scalescenes models for templates to cut parts, and as a colour guide, so I am still very fond of them.

It starts with a step by step making of some terrace houses. I might suggest for a first try, using some of the plastic window frames, rather than metal etches. I also go for a thin wooden ply base/frame, but it is probably a bit over the top. It does mean that my buildings can be dropped off a work bench with little damage, just a dent in the bricks (or auto spalling) but if you are more careful, no need for that. The book recommends thicker plasticard as the frame, sp it can all (well mostly) be done with Mek and a Stanley knife

I have actually found making buildings with pasticard, ply and brick sheets easier than the Scalescenes, as they are very solid. You do have to invest in a few Evergreen strips, tubes, for some bits, and a few other things which can be fun the hunt down at shows (white metal chimneys for instance).

I have also found Geoff Taylor's method of painting really good.

As  have a young daughter, and only get to model in bursts, I don't have a problem with the 24 hour waits between adding layers of plasticard or paint, so although I am fairly patient, some of it is enforced patience, rather than careful planning.

 

More at: http://www.gtbuildingsmodels.co.uk/

After Geoff Taylor's books, the next two things I would advise in getting are a Dremel multi tool - Google/Amazon/Hardware shops , and for a treat, or maybe Christmas a nice airbrush with a compressor.

 

Right, back to the goods warehouse for a bit.

 

Jamie

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A few more pics of progress on the goods building.

Sitting in place on the layout, with the brick card glued on. The offcuts of wood giving a very rough idea of where the platform will be.

Goods11.jpg

Strips of 30 thou plasticard, with a layer of brick card are starting to be added to form the vertical buttresses (is that the right term?).

Goods12.jpg

 

A first layer, mid and top, of the brick layered detail. I think it is time to learn some architectural terms for what parts of a building and brickwork details are actually called, any advice is always apreciated.

Goods13.jpg

Detail from one of the Warwickshire Railways website photos to show the layer of detail in the brick work I am aiming to give a representation

of, but not an exact copy. I also have all the recesses for each window to put in with thin strips of brick card, and the last thing I will do brickwork wise is to glue on the the arch detail etches from the frets I bought from ......, I won't say it again, you know who.

Goods14.jpg

Next time, I will post at least one photo with a loco in it.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Great thread Jamie and some super modelling. As you can see, I went down the handbuilt track route which may have been overly ambitious but we will see..... Your method is safer and less likely to leave a massive problem! The cutting and splicing of the peco turnouts and crossings gives a far more realistic flow.

Love the buildings, especially the water tower/coaling stage. Whose Braithwaite panels did you use?

I was also helped a great deal by Geoff Taylor's instruction, but from the DVD rather than the book.

 

Thanks and keep us posted. Wonderful times with the little daughter too I guess?

 

Iain

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Thanks Iain.

 

The Braithwaite panels are from Geoff Taylor. In his first book (pictured above) there are several pages of etches pictured at the end, or you can see them at:

 

http://www.gtbuildingsmodels.co.uk/page16etchespics1.html

 

You can order by phone or there is a form on the website.

 

Strictly speaking the Plaistow tower should be riveted, but as I am not modelling an exact place, and this was my first scratch built building, I wanted to use things that would give the feel, rather than be exact representations. I am very happy with the etches and the final result.

 

At times I wish I had gone for hand built track, I am planning to replace the points at the 'North' end of the station with hand built ones. Cutting down Peco points is OK for crossovers on straight bits of track, but to fit the gentle curve at that end of the station they create an ugly movement  with coaches in particular, and the the too sharp curve  to fit to the straight crossovers has also caused a couple of derailments, so when I get the chance I will replace those with C&S kits. I also prefer the look of the switch rails on handbuilt track, the Peco squared off ones are always a giveaway.

Thanks for the comments, and I will keep following your layout as we both seem to be aiming to achieve a similar urban feel with out locations.

As for Ella, she is just lovely, I am biased on that, but I think I am right too.

All the best.

 

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Thanks, I have used GT's website a lot and have a number of etched window requirements for the rest of the buildings. I used the Gibson panels on my water tank, which isn't yet completed. The GT ones suit yours really well - they wouldn't have been quite right for the Camden one.

 

I too will enjoy following Ellerby. And I doubt you're biased about Ella, but it doesn't matter if you are!

 

Iain

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One of the advantages of using a thin ply base is that you don't have to worry about how fragile the model is.

Here are a couple of pictures of Ella Beatrice (Miss Bean), she who the station is named after, checking the quality of the detailing I have been adding the last couple of days.

The building is now called 'House!'.

 

Goods16.jpg

 

Goods15.jpg

I think she is fairly happy with the progress.

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Just a closer still to show how the brick details, and I am starting to add a few other arch etches, which are helping me get the arches cut accurately.

I am going to do the floor brick details last so that I can fit them to the platform, or at least an edge to work with into the platform.

Goods17.jpg

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Just had a read over this thread, most enjoyable. I look forward to future updates.

 

Regards 

Scott 

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A Craftsman kit conversion of a Hornby Class 121 to a 128, Midland version, sitting at a couple of bits of wood standing in for the platform.

Goods18.jpg

When Heljan move on from the Western region version to the Midland, the conversion kit will be a bit redundant. I enjoyed doing it though, but the recesses for the doors are a bit too deep so they will be redone at some point. I will be tempted by the Helajn model, but in green I suspect.

Goods19.jpg

The progress on the goods building continues, the window recesses have taken a couple of days, but are almost done, just a bit of filling when I have had to add some small wedges to fill the corners.

Goods20.jpg

Goods21.jpg

Although the original building has a lot of detail in the decorative brickwork above each story, I think for an OO gauge model there is enough there, otherwise it could become too cluttered. Some of that detail looks moulded, so would be less than 1 brick, or 1mm, which would mean some sort of casting to reproduce I suspect. So I will stick with this level of detail.

Thanks for everyone's feedback, more soon.

Jamie

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A very quick update, just to show a couple of photos of the goods warehouse main door. I am adding the ethches for this door and the windows above and to the right before painting, as they help form the back of the brickwork in the recess, but the other windows will wait until I have painted the brickwork, which will be a little while yet.

 

The doors will be midland region maroon, and the windows cream, all weathered.

 

More soon, I hope.

Goods22.jpg

 

Goods23.jpg

 

Edit: I forgot to say that I was quite surprised when after trying to glue the plastic door knob (small cut from a thin round Evergreen strip) with Evostick, and failing, that it glued to the metal etched door with Mek.  I do like Mec, that and Humbrol filler which I use quite liberally, it all blends in when painted.

 

I also spent some time today re-reading 2ManySpams fantastic 'Diesels in the Duchy' thread to see some of the very best in modelling buildings, as well as a little of the Emgaugse70s website. http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/12234-diesels-in-the-duchy-aka-st-blazey-dcc-em/

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Starting on the back, using some small arched windows (not sure what make, two sizes of plastic ones) to go just above head height alongside where the pavement will go.

After a look at Todmorden and Sheffield (hilly town, city) I am going to alter the roof very slightly. The building at Birmingham New Street had a lean to type roof, which my model currently has, but it is against a very high wall behind, on my model the building stands higher than the back wall, so I will cut in a small slope at the back.

Two chimneys will be added too, as this building will have some lights and sense of having offices in.

 

Goods24.jpg

Goods25.jpg

Using thin ply as the base, with brick card over the top again. The holes for the windows have been cut quite loosely, and will be filled in with plastic strip/offcuts on the ply. They are cut accurately on the brick card. The surrounding arches are being made from the Wills small arches, nicked with a knife to make them curve into a semi circle.

 

I have also realised that I will have to finish the front a bit more and get the window etches and glass in, before fixing the back on. I will have to start painting the front brickwork to get that done too.

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A couple of details added to the front, a bell from a set of plastic building details, and the number tabs from Dapol/Airfix plastic kits, with the number filed off makes a nice junction box.

 

Both are connected by wire made from heating the plastic sprue over a candle, and pulling when it softens.

 

Goods26.jpg

 

I have now painted around the windows and into the recesses with a base coat of Humbrol Matt 70, brick red. I need to do this so that I can get the window etches and glass (clear plastic sheet) in before I work more into the back and sides. The back can be seen with the first windows and arch surrounds being added behind in this picture.

Goods27.jpg

 

I hope this isn't too many small posts, but am just adding things as I do them at the moment.

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Guest jonte

A couple of details added to the front, a bell from a set of plastic building details, and the number tabs from Dapol/Airfix plastic kits, with the number filed off makes a nice junction box.

 

Both are connected by wire made from heating the plastic sprue over a candle, and pulling when it softens.

 

Goods26.jpg

 

I have now painted around the windows and into the recesses with a base coat of Humbrol Matt 70, brick red. I need to do this so that I can get the window etches and glass (clear plastic sheet) in before I work more into the back and sides. The back can be seen with the first windows and arch surrounds being added behind in this picture.

 

Goods27.jpg

 

I hope this isn't too many small posts, but am just adding things as I do them at the moment.

 

Great stuff, Jamiel. Right up my street.

 

Please keep it coming if only for my sake  :)

 

Jonte

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I've only just found this thread, thanks mostly to Sandside :). Absolutely superb modelling!

 

Can I ask - you've shown a dimension for the modelled area, but what is the overall size of the layout? It looks similar to mine, but you seem to have a heck of a lot more track than I do, so I'm suspecting it's camera foreshortening that makes it look smaller than it actually is...

 

 

Lee

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Hi Lee

 

Thanks for the encouragement.

 

The overall size of the layout is 16ft6in by 9ft6in, or 5m by 2.85m.

 

That said the turn just beyond the tunnels is a little tighter than I would like, so depending on where the layout ends up being permanently based I would like to extend this a little so that I can put steam engines on a closer tender spacing.

Given the opportunity I would like to make it a little longer too, as there isn't really room for a run in, run out fiddle yard, which I would like.

Although the garage here was to a large extent built for the layout, when the arrival of my daughter evicted me from the spare room (now a nursery, or perhaps young ladies room), we now expect to move later this year, and so when we do settle, the layout will probably be put in a wooden shed, especially after seeing 92220's Camden Shed setting. That might be a while yet through, depending on work.

If anyone is looking for a large 2 bed flat in North Leeds (Meanwood/Moortown) with a good size double garage suitable for a layout of this size, please drop me a line, we are putting it on the market later this year. (I hope that isn't against forum rules).

I have got a lot of track into a small space by setting the layout in a cutting, or valley. Were it out in the open it would have been built over a wider space.

The curve in the station is a lot tighter than would be prototypical, as well. I used York station as a guide for the central 4 track spacing, but it is a little tighter than that. MkI and MkII coaches were used to check there was no clipping of stock on the curve, but when I got a HST and MKIII coaches (which are quite a bit longer) there is a slight clip if I run it through past other passenger trains. I will have make sure that my timetables (if I am that orgainsed) don't send HSTs through past other passenger trains.

I also decided to build the bridge over the North end of the station to disguise some of the curve, and also to make trains look like they are longer than they really are, by masking them with this tunnel.

 

It is a fine balance between realism and having the stock movements that you want to use.

 

I hope that helps.

 

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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Cheers Jamie, that's great information. I originally started building a layout 2 years ago for my son's train to run on, and it kind of grey from the 6ftx3ft baseboard to twice that size. I've not got much further really since those first beginnings, having now ripped the track back up. I've been inspired and influenced so much by RMWeb recently, up to the point of giving myself delusions of Grandure.. I'd love to be able to create something like what you're achieving, and in an ideal world, the finescale quality of Sandside's Bacup and Coachmann's Greenfield, but in reality, I have to work with what I've got - namely Hornby/Peco track and points and go back to the roots of why I started in the first place - to make something decent for my son's (and mine of course) trains to run on. It is after all, for him, so I need to step back and appreciate at 5 years old, he's not going to dispute the fact that it in no way matches any kind of prototype operation, but it doesn't stop me trying to build decent buildings and scenery to hide the toy train nature of the layout :)

I had the idea of a valley layout, and in some respects, it's going to be. I wish I'd seen your idea of an over-station before I spent 3 months building my alongside track Station though ;) With steps up to platform level, it won't work as an over- station... Hey ho.

 

Looking forward to seeing continued work on this, if the move allows - those retaining walls are just excellent,

 

Lee

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I'm following Lee around now. I have really enjoyed reading up on your work, it's looking amazing and I'm definitely clicking on the follow button.

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Thanks Lee, JCL and those who have ticked the 'Likes'.

 

Getting around to the windows now. I have 14 GT etched windows, and since I added a few more windows to the design, I am also using Wills plastic windows for four of the sash windows. The two big windows will have to be scratch built, which I am looking forward to.

The GT etches come in two parts so you can choose how open the sash is. I am only having one a bit open, so all the rest were soldered together. Probably overkill. but it worked anyway, and let me practice soldering. You can see one reversed in the photo below. They were primed with Halfords grey primer.

Windows1.jpg

Clear plastic from the Wills boxes (inside and the packaging) was cut and misted with light grey. Probably not enough, but it can be built up later.

 

Windows2.jpg

Windows now airbrushed with a mix of Railmatch Midland Buildings Cream (1 part) and White (2 parts) and thinned. When dry it was misted with a little mid grey to dirty it up a little.

Windows3.jpg

The glazing taped in with masking tape, but will be covered with strips glued over at the end, as I would expect that masking tape would dry and it all fall out in the long run. I also have a Dapol Standard Mogul kit that I just use to steal parts from. I have painted ten of the little 'pins' to add to some of the sash windows as the air extractors seen in some of the reference photos.

Windows4.jpg

Humbrol 121 stone (enamel) was panted on and wiped off quickly to get a mortar course before I started to add the windows. Other coats will be dry brushed on, so should be OK to be added over without affecting the windows, and even the a brick dusting would add to the windows dirt, which I do want on this building (I usually tone down the mortar course with a light airbrush of the red brick colour - it also brings an overall colour consistency to the model/layout). The painting does look a bit ropey at this stage, bur more layers bring it together.

 

Windows5.jpg

Sorry this one is a bit blurred, but it shows the progress on the back windows, which with the low level of the building, will be just around head height on the pavement next to the North part of the station.

Windows6.jpg

Looking forward to getting the rest of the windows in, and then progressing with the brickwork and roof.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Looking great and you've got the airbrush out. I bought one a while back and need to sit down for an hour or so working out what's to do before I start. Just a quick question, what do you use to clean it afterwards?

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Hi JCL

 

I was using quick reply, and must have caught some link and lost it all, so am going back 'more reply options', as that is probably more reliable.

 

The short answer is white spirit.

 

I mix the paint and thinner in a plastic cover from Peco point motors, I kept them all as they looked really good for that.

 

I run off the thinned paint I haven't used from the reservoir into a small jar (kept from some of my daughter's early food), wipe the reservoir with a kitchen towel, then run through a bout the thimble of white spirit three times, spraying tit into the kitchen towel until it comes through clear.

 

Before I start I run in a very small amount of water to check it is spraying through OK as well.

 

I did have to strip the whole brush and clean every part with white spirit really well once after I had left it for a while. I did buy some cleaning fluids, but to be honest I haven't had any problem with white spirit, and it costs a lot less. When I got it out a week ago it hadn't been used for six months, and worked perfectly first time.

 

I spent a while reading the instructions etc, but what I found is that you screw the air hose in, switch on the compressor, then press the trigger, pull it back, and it sprays. Again, try a little water, it can't do any harm, and that is pretty much it. My brush and compressor are Iwata I think, (from Graphic Air who are quite nearby).

 

I haven't used it for fine line work, just general spraying, but I do tend to use normal brushes for fine detail, dry brushing and most weathering or painting anyway. I do use the airbrush for what would be metal covering that should not show brush strokes, and 'misting' (a light overall colouring), smoke covering, and to give an overall tint to things, which gives the layout a consistent look.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel

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The middle two windows. Scratch built from evergreen strip 0.54 x 0,86 mm, and hand cut strips of 20thou plasticard. Glued with Mek on to clear plastic, and using a template drawn on paper. Interestingly, if the Mek gets on the clear plastic it makes it look like 1930's (old) not very precisely set glass.

 

Windows7.jpg

 

The windows quickly taped in place to see how they look. You can also see the extractors in the upper floor windows.

Windows8.jpg

 

This bit is unpainted, as there will be a small wall built out at 90 degrees, but that will be the last bit done, as it will make the building hard to lay on its side.

Windows9.jpg

Pleased how these scrathc built windows have turned out, but they will be a b***er to paint I suspect, but that is for tomorrow. It will also all need dusting/weathering with the airbrush as well. Looking forward to when I can get one painting the next layers on the brickwork, that is when it will start to come together.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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