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Bachmann announce Midland Compound


Andy Y
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And of course there are 'interim' black-liveried locos with 'British Railways' lettering on their tenders,such as Hornby's 46252 'City Of Leicester'.Quite a few Duchesses carried black well into BR days.Perfectly feasible to run with a black 'Compound'--circa 1948/9.Whist on the subject of'black is beautiful',might be a good idea to nudge Bachmann in the direction of a post-war BR black 'as built'Patriot' Limited Edition,anyone ? Sorry-----dreaming,again.

Edited by Ian Hargrave
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The last Scottish compound was withdrawn from Stranraer in May 1958, so the answer to that is, unfortunately, 'no'.

Just checked my 1959 Ian Allen shed book which give the allocation as follows - definitely none in Scotland

 

40907 41C Millhouses

40925 21B Bournville

40936 3E Monument Lane

41049 17A Derby

41062 21B Bournville

41063 55F Manningham

41083 17A Derby

41090 17A Derby

41094 55A Leeds (Holbeck)

41100 55A Leeds (Holbeck)

41101 24J Lancaster

41102 17A Derby

41113 24J Lancaster

 

 

 

Ray

Edited by Silver Sidelines
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It's a shame that like the 3F the tender brakes are not in line with the wheels otherwise at first glance it looks a great model. Now I just need to build a layout to run it on.

 

The good news is that the brake shoes are not moulded as part of the frames, and could be moved in nearer the wheels if you wanted (to make the effort).

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The good news is that the brake shoes are not moulded as part of the frames, and could be moved in nearer the wheels if you wanted (to make the effort).

 

Thanks for the observation, I've not had mine out of the box, but the tender axle boxes look on the shallow side too. I may have to build the tender from a Bill Bedford compound kit that I have had some some time. Still not started and my remain so as I couldn't build anything so good as Bachy's. It may act as a donor for super-detailing purposes.

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  • 1 month later...

Having got the NRM model, I have tried to resist this version, however upon finding that the early crest loco was shedded at Gloucester, I couldn't resist.

 

Chances are that it would have frequented the Brunel Shed at Temple Meads:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bristol_Temple_Meads_Station,_original_terminus_with_steam_train_and_Diesel_railcar_-_geograph.org.uk_-_2124234.jpg

 

In my youth, many an hour was spent exploring this place, prior to it's partial fitting out as a 'venue'.

 

I also recall the buffet set in the 'v' between the new station and old, and indulging in the original BR 'brunch muffin' (which I am convinced McDonalds ripped off many years later!)

 

As the layout is currently stowed, it may have to wait a few weeks for a run-in, but it looks a beauty.

 

N

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  • 1 month later...

Just checked my 1959 Ian Allen shed book which give the allocation as follows - definitely none in Scotland

 

40907 41C Millhouses

40925 21B Bournville

40936 3E Monument Lane

41049 17A Derby

41062 21B Bournville

41063 55F Manningham

41083 17A Derby

41090 17A Derby

41094 55A Leeds (Holbeck)

41100 55A Leeds (Holbeck)

41101 24J Lancaster

41102 17A Derby

41113 24J Lancaster

 

 

 

Ray

 

Indeed few Compounds left in Scotland by 1959 but having just read O S Nock's 1950 book 'British Locomotives from the Footplate' there is a whole chapter on Scottish Expresses on the Midland and G & S W lines on either side of Carlisle with a lot of beautiful prose ...  Compounds with over 300 tons behind working unassisted and making prodigious speeds uphill, by the standards of rebuilt Scots even. 

 

Enough to inspire this picture of a TMC-weathered Bachmann 40932 renumbered 40920 .. an Ayr-based loco., several others in the a similar early post-war setting were based in Glasgow I think... many in Perth and similar too.    I used Bachmann LMS carriages still in an approximate reddish hue....  perhaps on a service between Carlisle and Glasgow, with the famous Glasgow and South Western artistic interpretation of speed restrictions for curves in evidence.  According to O S Nock the engines were not best at high speed uphill hard work but could really produce astounding and economical power uphill at medium speeds and race downhill, with is in accord with their short lap valve setup.

 

post-7929-0-69706800-1365372013.jpg

 

Rob

Edited by robmcg
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Hi all

 

Quick question, am I correct in thinking the difference between this Compound and the NRM version is different size driving wheels and a different tender? if so having purchased the LMS one of these can the NRM one be used as is(with a repaint) for a post war LMS Compound to give me something slightly different and if so what are the suitable numbers?

 

Ian

Edited by ianwales
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Hi all

 

Quick question, am I correct in thinking the difference between this Compound and the NRM version is different size driving wheels and a different tender? if so having purchased the LMS one of these can the NRM one be used as is(with a repaint) for a post war LMS Compound to give me something slightly different and if so what are the suitable numbers?

 

Ian

Even the Midland Compounds book by members of the LMS society does not give all the visual answers. From my own experiences converting a NRM Compound to BR condition, the hardest part is shamfering the rectangular cylinder cover beside the smokebox base. Some MR style boxes did survive on locos renumbered by BR but other things to contend with are shorter chimney and replacement Fowler 3.500 gallon tender or rebuilt tender with short tank. For example, 41009 got BR lined black while coupled to a Deeley tender but it had LMS shorter boiler mountings and shamfered cylinder covers. No.1008 was the same during the war but might have been altered by BR days.

 

Believe me it is a minefield, not helped by the fact that the Deeley tender is modelled on the S&DJR tender at the NRM, so that in itself requires some carving. All the MR-built locos gone by 1953.

Edited by coachmann
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  • 3 years later...
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Bump...

 

Acquired one of these the other week - an eBay bargain. It's coachmann's (Larry's) fault he'd mentioned in another thread how well they ran compared to other 4-4-0's and I was curious.  :jester:  :jester:

 

They're an absolutely stunning loco and run beautifully (even on DC with a DCC chip installed). Mine however won't be staying pristine... ;)

Edited by toboldlygo
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Bump...

 

Acquired one of these the other week - an eBay bargain. It's coachmann's (Larry's) fault he'd mentioned in another thread how well they ran compared to other 4-4-0's and I was curious.  :jester:  :jester:

 

They're an absolutely stunning loco and run beautifully (even on DC with a DCC chip installed). Mine however won't be staying pristine... ;)

Agreed it's a very under rated model and generally a bargain.

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A personal reflection. These locomotives were responsible for a eureka moment. I had recently received a Dapol Western and found much to admire about it yet it didn’t quite produce the fizz I expected it to and I didn’t pursue my original intention to get a red one. When I saw the NRM model of the Compound, I resisted it simply because it had the same number as my old Hornby Compound. I know I shouldn’t mention both in the same sentence but I don’t discard my old models; I just supplement them. When the LMS black Compound came along, I got one, expecting to like it without getting excited about it. Plain black, after all. I loved it! I thought hard about my reactions and concluded that it was the finish. The green Western was very flat but the Compound had Bachmann’s lovely lustrous black.

 

toboldlygo won’t approve at all; still, it takes all sorts to make the world – even my sort. :crazy:

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Talking of modifying these models, 936 and 933 ran with an experimental tender of Fowler frames and with an experimental tank with curved in sides that are a combination of the Fowler bottom half and Stanier top half. Does anyone know of a drawing of this tender? - there are various photos with both engines.

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  • 2 years later...
  • 7 months later...

If anyone is looking for an immaculate, brand new Midland Compound 1000, I’ve just put one up for sale on eBay. Beautiful locomotive that could happily sit on a display shelf and one that deserves a good home....

 

Please remove posting if outside rules, but Bachman/NRM have produced an outstanding model that I was lucky enough to see at KX double heading with City of Truro.........


image.jpeg.c8d85032d13eea8d7038275745b3c4d4.jpeg 


image.jpeg.e99791e3702a9d39f197e2b834fbdcb2.jpeg

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The compound is one of Bachmanns best models.

 

I think its release it was very over priced to its contemporaries, leading to many people passing it by as there is no rush to buy it.

After time it was heavily discounted, again leading to people passing it by as “there is always another one”.

 

Hornbys K1 is another example. The price and demand mix need to be right.
 

Shame as the engineering was excellant, though lucky me acquired a bunch to upgrade various Triang chassis under various kit built 4-4-0’s, and the fowler tenders came in useful for various projects... I dissected more than 10 that way, after selling the bits it was nearly cost neutral, Compounds selling between £40 and £60 at one point.

 

 

Edited by adb968008
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  • 4 months later...
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Sorry to bounce this thread again. Being forced to work from home  in the middle of the railway room (the attic) I am letting a train circle the layout as 'white noise' - its certainly less distracting than the radio!

 

Anyway, I've got 41157 running today and I'm trying to imagine its sound (imagination is far cheaper than DCC Sound!). My question is, the Compounds being 3 cylinder, are they 6 beats per revolution like a conventional 3 cylinder loco or does the sound of the outside cylinders dominate so they sound as if they 4 beats per revolution? I haven't found a decent clip of one on line that really shows this one way of the other so far.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, MikeParkin65 said:

 

Anyway, I've got 41157 running today and I'm trying to imagine its sound (imagination is far cheaper than DCC Sound!). My question is, the Compounds being 3 cylinder, are they 6 beats per revolution like a conventional 3 cylinder loco or does the sound of the outside cylinders dominate so they sound as if they 4 beats per revolution? I haven't found a decent clip of one on line that really shows this one way of the other so far.

 

 

I could run my DCC sound one & report on that, but I don't suppose it would really answer your question.

Seeing as it had 2 high & 1 low pressure cylinders, were they offset from each other at 120 degrees like they would be if all 3 were using the same pressure?

Either way, assuming the low pressure cylinder produced a softer exhaust, then this would make them sound a little uneven.

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6 minutes ago, Pete the Elaner said:

 

I could run my DCC sound one & report on that, but I don't suppose it would really answer your question.

Seeing as it had 2 high & 1 low pressure cylinders, were they offset from each other at 120 degrees like they would be if all 3 were using the same pressure?

Either way, assuming the low pressure cylinder produced a softer exhaust, then this would make them sound a little uneven.

I found a clip of the Irish compound 'Merlin' going like the clappers and it roared very like a Scot or a Jubilee but it was shifting so fast there was no chance of counting the beats! I would have thought I'd be able to find a decent clip of MR 1000 that could prove the point but haven't found anything definitive so far. I suppose its last steaming (1981 I believe) just predates the common use of video recording by enthusiasts 

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The dominant 'engine' sound is of the cylinders that exhaust directly via the chimney, which is the two LP cylinders which were conventionally quartered, so giving the regular four beats per revolution. When Deeley was appointed as Midland CME, he altered the Smith/Johnson compound design and simplified the controls, and rebuilt the original five to conform, and this design was continued under Fowler on the LMS. Thus modified the Compounds always started as two cylinder simples, (no steam to the HP cylinder) with compound working commencing once well underway, by the driver opening the regulator fully. Thereafter compound working was maintained until the regulator was fully shut.

 

An acute observer in the right location might have heard the effect of the changeover from simple to compound working, because if the compounding was successful, then the pressure of the LP exhaust ought to have been reduced. Never read such a description.

 

The HP cylinder was set at 135 degrees to the LP cylinder cranks for optimum mechanical balance, but with no direct exhaust path to atmosphere was effectively silent. Had it been significantly audible then the beats would have been 6 per revolution in a very readily recognised pattern compared to the four beats of a simple, bursts of three beats, pause and repeat:

Two cylinder: Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet

Compound:    Chuff Chuff Chuff quietChuff Chuff Chuff quiet Chuff Chuff Chuff quietChuff Chuff Chuff

Edited by 34theletterbetweenB&D
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1 hour ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

The dominant 'engine' sound is of the cylinders that exhaust directly via the chimney, which is the two LP cylinders which were conventionally quartered, so giving the regular four beats per revolution. When Deeley was appointed as Midland CME, he altered the Smith/Johnson compound design and simplified the controls, and rebuilt the original five to conform, and this design was continued under Fowler on the LMS. Thus modified the Compounds always started as two cylinder simples, (no steam to the HP cylinder) with compound working commencing once well underway, by the driver opening the regulator fully. Thereafter compound working was maintained until the regulator was fully shut.

 

An acute observer in the right location might have heard the effect of the changeover from simple to compound working, because if the compounding was successful, then the pressure of the LP exhaust ought to have been reduced. Never read such a description.

 

The HP cylinder was set at 135 degrees to the LP cylinder cranks for optimum mechanical balance, but with no direct exhaust path to atmosphere was effectively silent. Had it been significantly audible then the beats would have been 6 per revolution in a very readily recognised pattern compared to the four beats of a simple, bursts of three beats, pause and repeat:

Two cylinder: Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet Chuff quiet

Compound:    Chuff Chuff Chuff quietChuff Chuff Chuff quiet Chuff Chuff Chuff quietChuff Chuff Chuff

Brilliant - thankyou. I love this forum :)

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  • 3 months later...
3 hours ago, GreatWesternFan220 said:

Hi all,

 

I haven't posted on RMweb for quite some time but I thought I'd like to show off my repaint of a Bachmann Compound into it's proper colors (might've offended some people Lol). The model was previously Bachmann's LMS plain black variant that was obtained second hand from a well known auction website. This project was 4 months in the making and I am very pleased with how this turned out. I may not be as skilled and talented as many of you on here so it might not be a "professional finish", so there are many imperfections/compromises. This project came to be as I have grown tired of waiting for Bachmann to announce an LMS crimson one as part of their main range so I took it upon myself to create my own "Crimson Rambler". The lining and cabside numerals are from HMRS and the modern warning stickers and smokebox numerals are from Fox Transfers. As I am from the US I had to use what was available, so the paint used in this project was Humbrol's no.20 Crimson (I am sure Railmatch and Precision Paints produce a more authentic shade of LMS crimson). The loco has modern warning stickers because this is a loco based at my fictional heritage railway that ventures out on the mainline from time to time but is not a regular performer like 6233, 60163, etc. Once I get accustomed to using this website again I will be posting more pictures of this loco and my other models in specific galleries (if that is possible) but in the meantime, I hope you all like my repaint. Any feedback is greatly appreciated. Will delete if considered inappropriate or if asked.

20201223_130327_70.jpg

20201223_125826_70.jpg

20201223_130220_70.jpg

20201223_130015_70.jpg

20201223_125616_70.jpg

Looks good to me, and here's hoping this is the precursor to Bachmann releasing one, in the "damn, I've just built a kit one!" way of things.

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