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Worsdell Forever's LNER F8 2-4-2T Scratchbuild.

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I've managed to get the driving wheels fitted tonight along with the motor/gearbox and rods, it all seems to run smoothly and it's all been lubricated with Carrs white grease. Next job is to make and fit pick-ups and fix the motor down.

 

post-7104-0-81873700-1336340131.jpg

 

post-7104-0-92961000-1336340142.jpg

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As the F8 has a driving wheel base of 8ft 1.5inches whose coupling rods are you using?

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They are Alan Gibson 'Universal' rods, well, half of a set anyway, made up to the correct length.

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Very nice work Paul. You have also shown that scratchbuilding doesn't need to take forever, if you get stuck in and get on with things.

 

It will be almost a shame to paint it, especially black. How about a nice fully lined out NER green? :yes:

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Very nice work Paul. You have also shown that scratchbuilding doesn't need to take forever, if you get stuck in and get on with things.

 

It will be almost a shame to paint it, especially black. How about a nice fully lined out NER green? https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_yes.gif

 

Scratch building is not much different from kit building, except you have to cut your own parts out. All the duplicated parts are cut out together, so it is not much more time wise than for one. Valve gear can be a pain but it can all be done. But now they also seem to call making your own etched kit scratch building.

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Scratch building is not much different from kit building, except you have to cut your own parts out. All the duplicated parts are cut out together, so it is not much more time wise than for one. Valve gear can be a pain but it can all be done. But now they also seem to call making your own etched kit scratch building.

 

Don't get me started on that one!

 

I have argued long and hard that designing your own kit and then building it is still building a kit. Otherwise you could have two identical locos, built from the exact same components, with one being kitbuilt and one being scratchbuilt just because two different people built them!

 

There should be a proper definition of what constitutes scratchbuilding but nobody would ever agree. Does a pantograph milled set of parts count? What about a part drawn on a computer and then laser cut or 3D printed? To me, the major parts would have to be cut by hand from raw material but many others would disagree and have equally valid ideas.

 

I have built quite a few locos over the years, some whitemetal kits, some brass/mickel silver etches and a small number of scratchbuilds. The latter give massively greater satisfaction and I am all in favour of more scratchbuilding. I can't count how many times I have started a kit and then decided that it would have been quicker and easier to make the thing from scratch!

 

I really do think that the way Paul has illustrated his build on this thread is a very good way of showing people just what is possible and how to go about it and I hope that it encourages one or two others to dip their toes in the scratchbuilding waters.

Edited by t-b-g
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I have argued long and hard that designing your own kit and then building it is still building a kit. Otherwise you could have two identical locos, built from the exact same components, with one being kitbuilt and one being scratchbuilt just because two different people built them!

Funny, I've come to the conclusion that most of the trade cobbles together a set of scratch builder parts and calls them a kit.

Edited by billbedford
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Funny, I've can to the conc lusion that most of the trade cobbles together a set of scratch builder parts and calls them a kit.

 

Some more so than others.

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Funny, I've come to the conclusion that most of the trade cobbles together a set of scratch builder parts and calls them a kit.

 

I agree entirely but can I suggest that is a discussion for elsewhere? I have strong views on such matters and others may have too, so I would hate to see this lovely "build" thread turn into a rant against manufacturers and end up getting locked.

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I agree entirely but can I suggest that is a discussion for elsewhere? I have strong views on such matters and others may have too, so I would hate to see this lovely "build" thread turn into a rant against manufacturers and end up getting locked.

 

Tony,

 

why don't you start a thread on this. Then you and others can express your views and Bill can represent the suppliers.

 

Jol

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An interesting sub-topic has interrupted one of my favourite threads. I definitely don't think this is the place for it though.

 

For many, me included, this way of working is something to aspire to and I follow it regularly. Excellent work Paul, I'm eagerly awaiting the next instalment.

Steve

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Hi Paul,

 

Those phot's, in post #76, just shout "squareness and quality".

Well done sir, I look forward to more 'work done'.

 

Kev.

PS. With 15.5k members, (each with several acceptable views of what "is" and what "isn't"), that would give approximately 2^8 definitions of "What is scratch built".

We just ain't gunna agree!

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Paul,

Sorry for the high jack, I have opened another thread. I did not realise my coment was going to start so much coment.

 

Lets get back to the real thread here because the work and pictures are top class.

 

Peter

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For many, me included, this way of working is something to aspire to and I follow it regularly. Excellent work Paul, I'm eagerly awaiting the next instalment.

Steve

 

I agree completely. Lovely neat work, fine soldering and with that 'crisp' look I also aspire to. Oddly enough I had, prior to to sub-topic above occurring, been reminded by the photos of some magazine articles where someone builds an old but high quality etched kit such as Sayer-Chaplin or Mallard - intended as a compiment I assure you!

 

And thank you Tony for raising an new thread; I'll look it up.

 

Michael

Edited by 2mm Dabbler

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Paul,

Sorry for the high jack, I have opened another thread. I did not realise my coment was going to start so much coment.

 

Lets get back to the real thread here because the work and pictures are top class.

 

Peter

 

Nice one! I look forward to an interesting discussion on he new thread. You beat me to it but I ain't complaining!

 

One thing for sure, what Paul is up to certainly qualifies as scratchbuilding to me!

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Is it the black etch primer you have used on the chassis? If so how well did it work ?

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Hi Peter, it's Humbrol matt black from an aerosol over Simonez primer.

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post-7104-0-88050800-1332017449.jpg

 

Is that drawing from an issue of The Modeller?

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Thank you!

 

I may need to find a copy!

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  • Dear James, I have sent the drawing direct to your "E Mail" address. Best Wishes, Mick.

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If I recall the RM drawing was by Nick Campling and appears to be based on the weight diagram. It is just a thought, but the side view drawing by J M Fleming on page 91 of North Eastern Record Volume 3 appears to be closer to published photos.

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I've got the pick ups fitted tonight and it all seems to run well. It's my usual PCB fixed to the centre frame spacer with a 10BA bolt, the pick up wire is the thin phosphor bronze wire that comes with DG couplings. The feeds to the motor go around the front and will be hidden within the tanks.

 

post-7104-0-81812400-1336857664.jpg

 

And a short video of it running on the rolling road.

 

Edited by Worsdell forever
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Guest Natalie Graham

It is really starting to look the part now. I can't view the video, it says, 'this video is private'.

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