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N15class

N15class's 2012 Challenge, Push Pull Trailer third.

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Hmm, never done a semi-elliptical roof myself; I know David Jenkinson used to get long strips of timber moulding machined to shape, but he was building whole rakes of coaches at a time.

 

My normal method is is lots of plasticard profile formers, with a pre-curved length of 20thou plasticard secured to them. Not sure how practical this is in 7mm standard gauge, or for semi-elliptical.

How about this method for the flatter centre, and solid plastic strip filed to shape for the edges? Or solid balsa-wood sanded to shape and covered in thin card?

 

Not sure if any of this helps at all.....

Cheers, Dave.

 

PS Glad to see you are a Canon man!

 

I had thought of making the edges as a laminate and making a profiled scraper. Your centre idea sounds better than the way I was thinking. I could of picked a later one with an arc roof but then I would have to completly build the driving carriage.

 

Yes I am a canon man a lovely crimbo pressy from my wife.

Edited by N15class

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Here is some more work in progress. One side has had all the windows cut out. The other has the toplightsdrilled but not cut out. Yes I had to resort to a 3mm drill as my little punch could not cope with the thickness. I have also included a photo to hopefully show how the glazing slides in from the end. I feel this has worked well. Looks a little further back than it does in the photos of the prototype. But I am happy with it all in all.

 

I am having trouble that I am doing this instead of my other modelmaking. This was not supposed to happen. I must be stronger. It is a problem as I am not enjoying the Ivatt, but I am doing this. The Ivatt is or will be for sale, to finance the things I want, so should be getting priority.

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Anyway I hope you all are liking what is happening with the my trailer third. It will be a little different for a while as materials are now getting desparetly short.

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Looking superb Peter, I envy your successes with plasticard

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Thanks for kind words. I can assure you that it has not always been plain sailing with plasticard. I have had more than one that would of looked good at the front of a model aeroplane as a propeller.

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Anyway I hope you all are liking what is happening with the my trailer third.

Definitely!

Dave.

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Pleased about that Dave, I am actually having more fun building it than I thought I would.

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Instead of building the body for which I need some more plastic card. I thought I ought to do one of those jobs that could be left but is monotonous. I started the seat ends. The carriage originally had plywood seats, but at the time I am making this they had been upholstered, but still had the wooden ends on them. I am cutting out enough for the driving coach too. There are 27 to do in total, I started by cuttung out 26mm square bits of 40 thou plastic. I then drew the shape onto one of them, this I cut out half the profile. and used this as a template. I did this by laying it on another squareand drawing around it then rotating it to draw the other half, hopefully this helps to keep it all semetrical. I then stacked 5 together and drill 2 holes were the cutout is, to screw together whilst using the piercing saw. Then tidied up with a file.

I hate doing jobs like this they are so boring. I think while I am waiting for stock I will try and do all these little nasty things.

 

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Another little bit of the build has been done. It may not look much but I am hoping all these odd bit will save time in the future.

 

I did a few more seat ends, but the main part of todays exercise was to make the battery boxes. These are quite small compared to later carriage boxes. There seems to be one each side mounted centrally. I made four, two for this one and two for the driver. I will be posting either in the forum or on my blog the building of that one.

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I also have been looking for some balsa wood I thought I had brought to Brasil with me, no luck as yet finding it. with just two cupboards at the moment you would of thought it would have been easy. Things are pack very tightly to get it all in. I hope when I find it, I can make the seats from it. I don't fancy doing them in card.

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Something went wrong. I finally got around to cutting out the top lights on the last side. When I assembled the basic body, it came out at 8' 6". Most suprising.

 

It has come out quite strong which has pleased me. Just waiting for material now to do the floor. I still need to cut out the doors but not until the floor is in. Things around the doors have not quite lined up, but I can over come this when the entance ends are fitted. You will see how I set the end in from the end of the coach to leave the recess for the end proper. This does on this coach cause a few problems on this coach, but this is just the position of the end seats.

 

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Now the idea I have is to detail and paint the inside of the coach, I can then glue in a ceiling or the roof on to hold the sides straight at the top. Then to spray the outside I just slide some card into the glazing slot, and spray away with no fear, of overspray inside.

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Peter -

 

I've not 'visited' for a while - great progress! One thing about having several 'fiddly bits' to do - you do not have to do them all at once, and rather than build in batches, I tend to build a few of each at any one time, variety being the spice of life.

 

Regs

 

Ian

 

PS I thought South America was the 'home' of balsa wood? :stinker:

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Very nice, and some useful construction tips as well :yes: I'm looking forward to seeing you tackle the underframe

 

F

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Very nice, and some useful construction tips as well https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_yes.gif I'm looking forward to seeing you tackle the underframe

 

F

 

Thank you. I am looking forward to the underframe too. It means the body building has worked. I have ordered a pair of Roxey light weight Fox bogies for it. The rest will be scratch built with plastic and brass.

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Lovely details on this, and quite intricate. I have a secret desire for O gauge (but it's so expensive!) so I'm watching with interest.

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Lovely details on this, and quite intricate. I have a secret desire for O gauge (but it's so expensive!) so I'm watching with interest.

 

Thank you

 

I would tend to disagree with cost. Yes individual parts are more expensive but you need less. If you have a 10 foot space in O 3 points and a bit of track will give you a lot of layout in N it would probably be 10 or more points and loads of track. In O 2 engines and 20 wagons and a few coaches. In N or OO you need far more.

 

The Pull Push coaches I am building will cost less than £80 for the 2. I know you have to build them that's half the fun, but it is the price of 2 OO coaches. In my blog I am building a LBSCR A1 the kit cost £100 Not the best kit in the world but you end up with alovely little engine, costing about £175, You don't get much in OO for that now.

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David Jenkinson's plastikard coaches were very robust so you should not have any problems. His ends simply clipped on after sliding in the glazing. At the painting stage, I used my then standard red oxide primer, then sprayed a mid brown colour inside the coach and through the windows from the outside so that the inner skin was brown with no white plastikard showing through. Then strips of card were used as 'glazing' to prevent the body colour (crimson lake) from going inside the coach and onto the brown.

 

LG

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David Jenkinson's plastikard coaches were very robust so you should not have any problems.

 

That's good news. I'm following his book (almost page of page) in the construction of my Met Railway stock

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David Jenkinson's plastikard coaches were very robust so you should not have any problems. His ends simply clipped on after sliding in the glazing. At the painting stage, I used my then standard red oxide primer, then sprayed a mid brown colour inside the coach and through the windows from the outside so that the inner skin was brown with no white plastikard showing through. Then strips of card were used as 'glazing' to prevent the body colour (crimson lake) from going inside the coach and onto the brown.

 

LG

 

I got most of the ideas from David, I have built this way in oo but not O. The painting I do use an insert in the glazing slot, but I had not thought of red oxide primer as the colour for the inside. Have to see if I can get some here.

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Today I have been making more plasticard doilies. These are fro the entrances in the vestibule. After doing some work on the other carriage I think I am going to redo the vestibule partitions. I will have a look at that tomorrow.

 

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The next bit I will try to do whilst waiting for my stuff to arrive is the underframe or the seats, apart from those there is very little. I think I will finish it on time.

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Now we can make a little more progress with this carriage. My order of A3 plasticard arrived this morning. I can now get on and get the floor and interior sorted out.

 

I am hoping the bogies and buffers turn up soon too.

 

The card turning up seems to have reignited my enthusiasm for the coach.

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Right we are back on track again now. All I need now is the modelling time.

 

Since getting the plasticard I have added a 2mm floor. This has made it more rigid and squared everything upnicely. I also added the beading to the vestibule entrances just need to make the doors now. I am not sure if I add these after painting or before, the glazing is the problem with them.

 

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I then made use of all those seat ends I had made. I made the backs and swabs out of plasticard. the originals were plywood and later the were fabric, but it looks like from the photos they just covered what was there, not changing the seats, as the shape of the covered ones is very similar to the wooden ons. I will paint as if fabric any way.

 

 

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Coming on a treat Peter; Can you maintain the structural strength across the vestibule, or is that always going to be a weak point?

 

Cheers,

Dave.

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Coming on a treat Peter; Can you maintain the structural strength across the vestibule, or is that always going to be a weak point?

 

Cheers,

Dave.

 

Thanks Rob

 

I think it will always be the weakest part, the roof will have to split there too. The vestibule goes right up to the inside of the roof. It will be strong enough I think to stop any nasty bending.

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Personally I would put a false ceiling in the vestibule...... It's not as if anyone would see up there. Solebars and trussrods will strengthen the bottom.

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Personally I would put a false ceiling in the vestibule...... It's not as if anyone would see up there. Solebars and trussrods will strengthen the bottom.

 

I had thought of doing that but thught I would wait till later and see how ot all fares with the solebars etc. I know it would not be seen I just want to keep as right as possible.

 

If I did it would match in with the seating compartments as they will have a false roof.

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