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OK, let's delete that and start again, todays objective lesson, why we don't ignore our low blood sugar and carry on typing.

 

Right, in about 1960 BR built a lot of 250(ish?) vans known as air dunnage vans for the purposes of carrying palletised loads of Izal lavatory paper. I believe the loads were wrapped in plastic which then had air blown into them to act as dunnage, many were also apparently used by Ford for a while for transportation. They are about the best design (in my opinion) that BR came up with, with the sides capable of being slid accross in the same manner as a sliding wardrobe door to allow access to the entire wagon.

 

Interestingly there is one of these vehicles preserved at Grosmont on the NYMR if you know where to look, and a certain amount of measuring up will have to be done. They are an interesting design as I believe many parts are almost totally non-standard, they are a slightly odd frame length, a bit of an odd wheelbase and a slightly odd suspension type. And if nothing else they hark back to outside framed wagons which should make construction interesting. I hope Paul doesn't mind me linking to his site for a photo:

 

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brizalvan/h1c8c1a43#h1c8c1a43

 

First job is to have a measure up of all the panels etc. on the surviving one and take it form there.

Edited by Boris
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An awfully large amount of ale, if the quality of the above post is anything to go by ;)

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Eeeeewwwww!........

 

Izal?!?!?!?......we had to suffer that at prep-school, always with the commandment to: "use both sides" :laugh:

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... wee built about 1960 for the tranporting of Izal Lavatorial Supplies...

Evaporated until solid presumably? The copious libation of ale should at least bring the raw material supply on stream. :angel:

 

For those poor souls with no experience of Izal, get you to a grocery store and buy some siliconised baking parchment. Cut some into 120mm on a side square sheets or thereabouts, and then attempt to use it as lavatory paper. Don't flush it away as it will block the foul drainage. If you are wise don't try this at all...

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Made a good tune with a comb though........before it was used of course.

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Made a good tune with a comb though........before it was used of course.

 

Yeah, you could pick up allsorts from a used comb!

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For those poor souls with no experience of Izal, get you to a grocery store and buy some siliconised baking parchment. Cut some into 120mm on a side square sheets or thereabouts, and then attempt to use it as lavatory paper. Don't flush it away as it will block the foul drainage. If you are wise don't try this at all...

 

I was born in 1984 but remember toilet paper that resembled tracing paper when I was at junior school...

 

...wish I didn't!

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I was born in 1984 but remember toilet paper that resembled tracing paper when I was at junior school...

 

...wish I didn't!

 

That's the stuff, we actually used to get sent to the toilets if the class ran out of tracing paper.

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That's the stuff, we actually used to get sent to the toilets if the class ran out of tracing paper.

Quite so, we lived on it at boarding-school. Shiny on one side and like sandpaper on the other. It was useful in various ways, just not as it was intended.

Dave. (Dorm Prefect)

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Quite so, we lived on it at boarding-school. Shiny on one side and like sandpaper on the other. It was useful in various ways, just not as it was intended.

 

When allowed to become fully saturated it could be stuck to a ceiling and would fall about 10 minutes later with a satisfying splat, most amusing at 8 years old.

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OK, let's delete that and start again, todays objective lesson, why we don't ignore our low blood sugar and carry on typing.

 

Right, in about 1960 BR built a lot of 250(ish?) vans known as air dunnage vans for the purposes of carrying palletised loads of Izal lavatory paper. I believe the loads were wrapped in plastic which then had air blown into them to act as dunnage,

 

Interestingly there is one of these vehicles preserved at Grosmont on the NYMR if you know where to look, and a certain amount of measuring up will have to be done.

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brizalvan/h1c8c1a43#h1c8c1a43

 

First job is to have a measure up of all the panels etc. on the surviving one and take it form there.

 

This is the link http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brizalvan

 

The dunnage bags were full depth rubber bags between each pallet load, These were filled with air. This was in the days before there was sufficient understanding that suitably interlaced loads were very stable on pallets.

 

I measured the body at Derby the day before my daughter was born - Julie refused to come and help me that day :scratchhead:

 

Trev Mann and David Monk-Steel did the frame and rigging later. The one they found, like the one conserved on the NYMR, had the suspension altered - the auxilliary springing was removed. This seems to have been normal.

 

Paul Bartlett

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When allowed to become fully saturated it could be stuck to a ceiling and would fall about 10 minutes later with a satisfying splat, most amusing at 8 years old.

And if a suitably sized saturated wodge of it (about the size of a tennis-ball) was hurled at a particularly high ceiling, it would stick there for several years.....

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Trev Mann and David Monk-Steel did the frame and rigging later. The one they found, like the one conserved on the NYMR, had the suspension altered - the auxilliary springing was removed. This seems to have been normal.

 

 

I'm seeing David on Tuesday so I might have a chat to him about this project, it's just possible he may be able to save me some work.

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