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So, instead of doing what I should have been doing this afternoon (gardening, yawn...) I did a bit of research and found an article here:

 

http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/hayle-wharf-branches.html

 

which shows that the propelling move did indeed come all the way from St.Erth and down the incline to Hayle Wharf. Scroll down until you find some pictures with trains in them and the sequence begins with picture 7.

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They most certainly did propel all the way from St Erth to the Wharf.

 

One of the best sources is this page: http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/hayle-wharf-branches.html

 

Note the fourth picture: "The signals are still in place, however Hayle Signal Box closed four days later on 7th July, 1982 Note the catch point leading to the worlds first sand drag." Hence there being no problem with propelling, runaways were catered for. Plus the leading brake van prevented the possibility of runaways when descending.

 

Edit: beaten by Western Aviator (D1074??? :jester: )

Edited by Flood
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Always propelled from St Erth. No run around as previously mentioned. 

 

This pays problem to my potential model of the railway. The road shunter used to bring the tanks in/out of the oil depot as the loco would be trapped inside the depot. Answers on a postcard please....

Edited by winterbournecm
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Always propelled from St Erth. No run around as previously mentioned. 

 

This pays problem to my potential model of the railway. The road shunter used to bring the tanks in/out of the oil depot as the loco would be trapped inside the depot. Answers on a postcard please....

 

Do you read MRJ ? There was a very interesting article in a recent issue on building a road shunter based on a digger, which ran on rail wheels hidden behind the road wheels. I found the finished model very convincing.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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Always propelled from St Erth. No run around as previously mentioned. 

 

This pays problem to my potential model of the railway. The road shunter used to bring the tanks in/out of the oil depot as the loco would be trapped inside the depot. Answers on a postcard please....

One postcard coming up:

 

Leave the road shunter at the depot end and then follow the routine below:

 

Propel brake van, barrier wagons and loaded tanks into one of two of the old Octel sidings, drop off brake van and barrier wagons

Move forward and drop off the loaded tanks into the other Octel siding

Move forward over the crossing and reverse back to pick up the empty tank wagons

Move forward and reverse the empty tank wagons to couple to the barrier wagons and brake van

Move forward and reverse the empty tank wagons, barrier wagons and brake van to couple to the full tank wagons

Move forward over the crossing and reverse back to drop off the loaded tank wagons

Move forward and request clearance to cross the A30 and head back up towards Hayle Station

 

post-7112-0-12450600-1476371179.jpg

 

Keep the road shunter out of the way until the loco has gone, then you can shunt to your hearts content.

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  • 1 month later...

Do you read MRJ ? There was a very interesting article in a recent issue on building a road shunter based on a digger, which ran on rail wheels hidden behind the road wheels. I found the finished model very convincing.

 

 

... or a vid by a certain Mr York of Laurie Adams' working 2mm scale tractor on Yeovil Town.

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/111449-2mm-supermeet-25th-june-2016/page-2&do=findComment&comment=2350309

 

Assuming you want a 4mm one it should be dead simples compared to 2mm ;)

 

BTW, depending on your period I think the Octel works also had a tractor for shifting wagons up and down their compound. If you look closely at the 1950 Britain from Above images (register and log in so that you can pan & zoom) then you can see it parked up between the main office block and the first of the fairly windowless process buildings.

 

I can waste almost as much time on Britain from Above as I can on RMWeb... almost.

 

Regards, Andy

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  • RMweb Gold

You could always strip out one of those micro radio controlled cars that seem to be about. They should be able to be squeezed into a 4mm model tractor.

Not exactly controllable down to slow shunting speeds through...

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  • 3 years later...
12 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

I stumbled across this amazing picture yesterday which would make a nice little diorama.

 

 

That is excellent, thanks for sharing. I have stacks of Hayle photos as part of the research for my layout but I've never seen this one before.

 

Given the stance of the guard and driver I think this is a propelling move onto the wharf. The tank appears to be FWB3 - a demountable bromine tank belonging to F.W.Berk of St Albans. As far as I know, these worked to Watford Junction and were then transferred to a lorry for the remining journey to Berk's premises.

 

There is a set of photos that were taken of 810 on the wharf trip. Several have appeared in Bradford Barton albums. This feels similar and *MAY* be another pic from that occasion but I can't say for sure.

 

Regards, Andy

Edited by D869
Better guess of tank number
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2 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

I stumbled across this amazing picture yesterday which would make a nice little diorama.

 

810 Hayle Wharf

 

 

 

 

Everybody's missing the most important aspect of this photo - Philps' pasty bakery and shop; (top RH corner, on the edge of the quay).

 

Motorcyclists drove, (until very recently - and will again), all the way down from Birmingham; bought and ate a pasty; and then drove all the way back again !

 

John Isherwood.

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10 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

 

Everybody's missing the most important aspect of this photo - Philps' pasty bakery and shop; (top RH corner, on the edge of the quay).

 

Motorcyclists drove, (until very recently - and will again), all the way down from Birmingham; bought and ate a pasty; and then drove all the way back again !

 

That seems rather extreme. I can confirm though that I have been to Hayle and checked out Philps' pasties. Very nice. I didn't leave straight away. I visited the archives and took plenty of photos of the remaining structures on North Quay (aka Hayle Wharf to train folks).

 

I gather some prefer Hampson's pasties... controversial!

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9 minutes ago, D869 said:

I gather some prefer Hampson's pasties... controversial!

 

Whose pasties ? Never 'eard of 'em !

 

Barnecutt's pasties of Bodmin aren't bad, if you can't get Philps'; (nor are my wife's; but we've only been living in Cornwall for eight years) !

 

As for Ginsters - least said, soonest mended; they use MINCED beef - sacrilege !!!

 

John Isherwood.

Edited by cctransuk
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16 minutes ago, D869 said:

I gather some prefer Hampson's pasties... controversial!

 

7 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

Whose pasties ? Never 'eard of 'em !

 

Back of Foundry Square by the old chapel.  Rated by a few locals and those who prefer their pasties minus seasoning.  Definitely controversial ;)  

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2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

As for G#@$#@#s - least said, soonest mended; they use MINCED beef - sacrilege !!!

How does that word get through the swear filter. 

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10 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

 

 

As for Ginsters - least said, soonest mended; they use MINCED beef - sacrilege !!!

 

John Isherwood.

 

I was told by a drinking buddy that worked there for a while that they used road kill, the lorries would go out full of pasties and come back full of dead animals of whatever was found on the roadside.  :bomb_mini: :jester:

 

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53 minutes ago, Siberian Snooper said:

 

I was told by a drinking buddy that worked there for a while that they used road kill, the lorries would go out full of pasties and come back full of dead animals of whatever was found on the roadside.  :bomb_mini: :jester:

 

Did they die from eating the pasties?

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12 hours ago, Gwiwer said:

 

 

Back of Foundry Square by the old chapel.  Rated by a few locals and those who prefer their pasties minus seasoning.  Definitely controversial ;)  

 

Ahh - we'll perhaps have to make a double pick-up next time we're allowed to go to Hayle; (my wife find Philps' pasties a little too peppery for her taste).

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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21 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

Everybody's missing the most important aspect of this photo - Philps' pasty bakery and shop; (top RH corner, on the edge of the quay).

 

Motorcyclists drove, (until very recently - and will again), all the way down from Birmingham; bought and ate a pasty; and then drove all the way back again !

 

John Isherwood.

 

That detachable tank actually contains the bakery's daily gravy delivery.

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  • 11 months later...

Hopefully this link will work...

 

Every now and again something interesting turns up on the 'Nostalgic Hayle' Facebook group. This is an interesting shot of the weighbridge showing just how close the point switch blades were. More interesting still... the deck was still mixed gauge. No date posted with the pic but the Steam Packet Inn in the background makes it mid 60s or earlier. The weighbridge deck must have been replaced after this because it only had two rails when I saw it... which was before it was removed and reconstructed further along North Quay.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1389945024615259/permalink/2917566338519779/

 

... that just showed as a link. This one seems better...

 

170233846_3061194974108984_6842741441690

 

Edited by D869
pic link
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  • 2 months later...
On 17/06/2016 at 08:59, Martync said:

Do any original track plans for the layout on Hayle Wharves exist??  I've looked up old OS maps but they are none too helpful........

 

Here's one I prepared earlier...

 

Pentowan Calcining Works to Swing Bridge

 

image.png.3c89107930e467c4ec69d54bea34f45a.png

 

Swing Bridge to Engine Shed

 

image.png.479ec73533ad7ee82cfda9831ba80a64.png

 

Engine Shed and Station

 

image.png.4fa324ef32abad0932c55e5d71939daf.png

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