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Sandy, GN & LNWR, Going Postal.


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1 hour ago, Traintresta said:

I'm not sure if it's easier just to stick with the compensation beam, as the rear axle is already fixed.

 

I'd stick with the beam for simplicity.

 

The one I'm looking at is an 0-8-0 which is why I'm trying some CSB (which came in the post this morning)

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An 0-8-0? I'm wondering whether Mr Ivatt's engines might be a little too modern for you tastes, and that leads to the intriguing possibility that you are dabbling with an Avonside engine.

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On 11/07/2020 at 03:00, gr.king said:

An 0-8-0? I'm wondering whether Mr Ivatt's engines might be a little too modern for you tastes, and that leads to the intriguing possibility that you are dabbling with an Avonside engine.

 

Surely only an idiot would do one of them. - think of the valve gear! That's the whole reason why we only do early GNR. :)

 

In the meantime, I've been doing a bit of drawing to help Dave out with regards to the lining. Lord only knows if this is going to work, but the idea is for me to print the lining out on some laser compatible waterslide paper and send it halfway across the world to him. Please ignore the background colour, it is more to help the lining stand out than anything else. The lining itself was based on a photo Dave posted a few pages back. The red and black behind the rosettes are a combination of squinting at that black and white photo and comparing it to some photos of the Pullman 'Balmoral' to see if the tones match.

 

432948281_PullmanSide5-red-detail-wt.jpg.4d94c41abd28ad9e46cb5ed3963bc260.jpg

 

https://www.statelytrains.com/balmoral.html#demo/img/balmoral/tw930.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, JCL said:

 

 

Surely only an idiot......

 

In the meantime, I've been doing a bit of drawing to help Dave out with regards to the lining. Lord only knows if this is going to work,

 

 

There are 2 parts to this, drawing and application. Even if the first is successful there's always room for failure :rolleyes:

 

 

1 hour ago, Buhar said:

If that works as hoped, Jason, it's going to be spectacular! Got an Optivisor Dave?

Alan 

 

I've booked Hubble, I think I'm going to need it..

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  • 2 weeks later...
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It's been rather hectic recently with various other things such as GN society renewals taking my time but I have managed to make some progress on some etches that were delivered a few weeks ago.

 

A couple of vans of diagram 323 were the first on the bench, a simple enough construction but I thought I'd try something different for the roof.

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I built up the main body of the van then glued some balsa blocks in place, these were then sanded to the roof profile.

507.JPG.a01700c8bdeb8a492c9f0903ea7e9f20.JPG

I then glued a layer of 5 thou plasticard over the top and clamped it in place.

508.JPG.24eb2605c41bc69cf0713fb499e8485d.JPG

The end result was ok. Vents to fit but there are no known photographs so I will have to find some similar vehicles to work from.

 

Next was a Diagram 321 Postal van.

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Still some more work to do such as the external door gear, this is being made up from rod and scrap etch and won't be 100% accurate but from 3' * will be sufficient.

I haven't yet decided how to make the roof. The balsa worked ok but as I need a lot of stock I have looked at getting brass or aluminium profiled to suit but the cost is looking prohibitive. Another idea is to get a pressing tool made that can be used in a vice,  200mm is long enough for the 45' bogie stock and would keep the tooling cost down.  I've a few more enquiries to make on it before making a decision.  Plasticard for the roof would be fine if I could get it to form the shape consistently, but although it's not far out each time it's enough to look wrong.

 

 

 

 

*= on a dark foggy night in December.

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How about making a master, then warming the plasticard in a low oven? I believe it stays in the correct shape after it's cooled? Just make a wooden former or something?

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28 minutes ago, grob1234 said:

How about making a master, then warming the plasticard in a low oven? I believe it stays in the correct shape after it's cooled? Just make a wooden former or something?

Agreed. Make the former deeper than you need giving the styrene room to drape, mould, then trim to size. Alternatively if the former is good enough some vacuum formings might be an option.

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10 minutes ago, MikeTrice said:

Agreed. Make the former deeper than you need giving the styrene room to drape, mould, then trim to size. Alternatively if the former is good enough some vacuum formings might be an option.

 

A home made vac former is actually pretty easy. I made a little one to make the rear windows for the coronation beavertail.

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1 hour ago, grob1234 said:

How about making a master, then warming the plasticard in a low oven? I believe it stays in the correct shape after it's cooled? Just make a wooden former or something?

 

I used to do that for dome ended roofs, before they were available commercially.  It seemed to work OK with 10 thou Plastikard.

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Gone off resin casting then? even if you wanted several different widths, you could make a mould for half of one of the narrowest roofs, leaving only a centre strip to fill and smooth for a wider roof....

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23 minutes ago, gr.king said:

Gone off resin casting then? even if you wanted several different widths, you could make a mould for half of one of the narrowest roofs, leaving only a centre strip to fill and smooth for a wider roof....

 

That was my next option, I thought about initially going down the brass route so the end profile of the roof was nice and thin. If I made them up as resin castings I'd have to trim each end and I was trying to avoid making too much dust/waste as I need a lot of roofs.

 

Plasticard -  I have in the past made up masters and heated them in the oven, but I have experienced 'twisting' on longer lengths so thought I'd look at trying something different first.

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Phil Giffen, our late President at Ely (and owner of a building firm in his working days) got his chippy to set up a planing machine to make wooden roofs to a Gresley profile for his BSL kits.  He then used to cut them to length and sand the domes on.  Is that a possibility here?

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That sounds like he made a Whitehill(?...memory is fading)  block for a moulding machine. I used to have access to one big enough for that years ago but not now.

Another issue would be obtaining wood such as Jelutong to make them, it has a very close grain and was used for pattern making, weight would also start to be a problem on the larger vehicles.

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1 hour ago, chris p bacon said:

 

That was my next option, I thought about initially going down the brass route so the end profile of the roof was nice and thin. If I made them up as resin castings I'd have to trim each end and I was trying to avoid making too much dust/waste as I need a lot of roofs.

 

Plasticard -  I have in the past made up masters and heated them in the oven, but I have experienced 'twisting' on longer lengths so thought I'd look at trying something different first.

 

The late Alistair Rolf of No Nonsense Kits when asking about roofs for a MTK railcar suggested laminating thick plastic strips together, once completely dry sanding them exactly as you have done with the balsa wood

 

Two thoughts about balsa roofs if you are going to use them, first a thin then a full strength coat of sanding sealer . Secondly how about treating the balsa with liquid which hardens rotten wood for a greater strength

 

Lastly I may have some old soft wood roofs.  

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14 minutes ago, hayfield said:

The late Alistair Rolf of No Nonsense Kits when asking about roofs for a MTK railcar suggested laminating thick plastic strips together, once completely dry sanding them exactly as you have done with the balsa wood

 

 

I've done this a fair few times in the past but it's a slow process, as usual I was looking for a way I can replicate over and over.

 

The balsa was always going to be a sub roof for some thin plasticard so sanding sealer isn't required.

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  • 2 months later...
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Been a while as I've had a lot of other things to do (House move, GNRS renewals, hair and make up...) but I've still found time to sit at the bench and test build some etches.

 

Further back in the thread were the D321 Post van and the D323 4W van, I had a small issue with the artwork for the D323 so this has been corrected and is being re-done. I have also done the artwork for the D319 Postal Van, A D319 & D321 were coupled permanantly to make a D320 so it's a make 2 get one free for that one.

 

Also across the bench has been the updated Banana Van (D343) with the help of @jwealleans the original artwork was updated and the mistakes corrected. 

IMG_9023.JPG.df40f6bf72cb4c8e5d359c5b0ef5afe1.JPG

IMG_8916.JPG.41b5fb496e860929f7d24d1c0c0a624c.JPG

It now makes a much more accurate van, what a little sweetie it is :D

 

I also did the D341 Orchid van, this was a simple one as I had already drawn the underframe for similar vehicles.

8277614_IMG_2700copy.JPG.3b437c5ecc40b48804459d0ccd98f39c.JPG

 

Because I like the odd and unusual vehicles the GN had, then the next had to be a D339 Hound Van.

IMG_9730.JPG.05fffe0f886b9385c65a2399b83097a9.JPG

This van was probably not a regular through Sandy but the GNR rule book clearly states as Rule 1 that anything can be run. (this is written in pencil in my handwriting but I treat it as official)

One of the vans was rebuilt during it's life and had the sliding door replaced with double doors, so I added the 2nd set of sides to the sheet as this was cheaper for the artwork than to draw them as a seperate etch. 

IMG_7922.JPG.5cf53fefc8587c3558e0cdfe105051f3.JPG

 

The pictures show what I was able to draw and I will now add handrails etc to them, they have had a clean and de-solder since the pictures were taken. I did purchase an ultrasonic cleaner which has proved very useful in degreasing the bodies and underframes without scrubbing them and possibly damaging the brake gear etc,  although I will still run over the body sides and ends with 'Shiny Sinks' cleaner to buff them up before priming.

 

There is some more artwork in preparation, but that is a favour to help a fellow modeller and seems to have some of that valve gear and motion malarky on it so is a bit of a head scratcher (so far so good though)  I'm also re-visiting the birdcage brake from a couple of years ago to correct the numerous mistakes on that one (doors opening the right way for example!) and there is some more brass on the workbench which needs the soldering iron.

 

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1 hour ago, chris p bacon said:

 I did purchase an ultrasonic cleaner which has proved very useful in degreasing the bodies and underframes without scrubbing them and possibly damaging the brake gear etc,  although I will still run over the body sides and ends with 'Shiny Sinks' cleaner to buff them up before priming.

 

What liquid do you use in your ultrasonic bath?

 

Frank

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31 minutes ago, Chuffer Davies said:

What liquid do you use in your ultrasonic bath?

 

Frank

 

I tried this one Frank.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Premium-Ultrasonic-PCB-Cleaning-Fluid-and-Flux-Remover-Free-U-K-Postage/221986529977?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=520861707842&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2648

 

I figured as it's a PCB cleaner and can deal with flux it seemed the most likely candidate, I give the items a really good rinse after the bath.

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Really admire your work Dave. 

 

Creating etches and then building them yourself must be very satisfying.

 

If ever you feel like setting up a small business selling such etches, I'd be very much in the queue to purchase from you ;)

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You've prompted me, Dave, I don't think I've sent this to you.  This is the production etch, yet to be lined and lettered.

 

spacer.png

 

Dead straightforward, no problems at all to build.

 

I'll be in the line for an orchid van and a hound van when they're available.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by jwealleans
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4 hours ago, grob1234 said:

Really admire your work Dave. 

 

Creating etches and then building them yourself must be very satisfying.

 

If ever you feel like setting up a small business selling such etches, I'd be very much in the queue to purchase from you ;)

Thanks Tom....It's funny you should say that......JCL has been helping me (well doing all the work really) on a simple web presence where I can put all the details of the etches as well as some build pics and basic (Mike Trice said 'sparse' :D) instructions.

4 hours ago, jwealleans said:

You've prompted me, Dave, I don't think I've sent this to you.

Thank you Jonathan, that's brilliant.

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