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chris p bacon

Sandy, GN & LNWR, Sandy & Potton Tramway.

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What size is the layout?

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E gods, I was at Stratton from 73 -78. we were the last one's to do the 11+, I used to use a forged note to get out at lunchtime to do a bit of spotting at Biggleswade as there was a regular Cartic at about 1pm on the up with a "foreign" 47 in 76/77/78?

 

Oh no! It was 1969-1975 for me! If I had an O Level eaxm in the morning and nothing during the afternoon it was a Cravens up to St Neots just for something to do until the (Cook's) bus turned up to take us home! If you have the patience I might be able to dig out some old (reel film!) shots taken of the trackless embankments and bridge carrying the erstwhile line over the ECML taken during this time....

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What size is the layout?

 

The room is 28 feet x 11 ft 6" and as you can see it pretty much fills it, the end boards are curved as this allows me to get to the other side/corner, I also made the station platform board slightly narrower as this allows me to lean across it, for scenic works

It may seem odd that the best way to look at the Northern part is from the outside rather than the inside which is where it is operated from, but I wanted it to lose the "roundy roundy" effect by not being able to see it all in one go, and anyway when we were kids we looked down on it from the sandhills.........as we watched our football bounce down......followed by a chorus of "it's your turn to get it"

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Oh no! It was 1969-1975 for me! If I had an O Level eaxm in the morning and nothing during the afternoon it was a Cravens up to St Neots just for something to do until the (Cook's) bus turned up to take us home! If you have the patience I might be able to dig out some old (reel film!) shots taken of the trackless embankments and bridge carrying the erstwhile line over the ECML taken during this time....

 

Charlie Cook's buses, I remember the twin steer that sometimes had to take 2 goes at getting in the gates, you were lucky leaving in 75, you didn't endure the double deckers he brought, most probably from a scrapyard. Binns of Newcastle under all that Mauve paintwork, the inside coated with deisel soot as the exhaust didn't make it to the outside and so filled the cabin. :scared:

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Any progress Chris?

 

Sadly not much at the moment, been so busy with Madam's Mayorial engagements, work and other stuff (holidays) I just haven't been able to do much, but as the days shorten so does the working day and so that should mean more railway room time soon.

I have been doing research etc including measuring up and producing some drawings of Potton station which is a mirror image of Sandy (LNWR) and I have been getting some bits together to take a crack at some more of the buildings, although I am going to try a few different techniques (foamboard instead of laminated plasticard) when I build them.

 

Looking at all the ECML layouts on here now It wont be long before we can replicate most of the GN !

 

typing this has given me the itch to get back in there.........b****r work I'm going in !

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Well it must be time for an update.

 

It's been pretty hectic here in the run up to Xmas with little time spent in the railway room, but over the break I've managed to get in and get some more done.

post-4738-0-63805100-1356806587_thumb.jpg

This shows the Station area and the roughings of the ground levels, as seems customary there is the usual clutter that I seem to create.

post-4738-0-03609100-1356806606_thumb.jpg

 

The main tools are offcuts of Celotex and Polystyrene insulation, Gripfill (not for the poly though) Stanley knife, drywall saw & Surform, oh and under the baseboard a cheapo vacuum cleaner which has to be the most essential bit of kit for this job.

 

post-4738-0-63140600-1356806619_thumb.jpg

 

A few more bits need sticking down, For the Polystyrene I use Plasterbaord adhesive as I always have half bags left over with work, it also makes a good fine filler.

 

post-4738-0-69780100-1356806632_thumb.jpg

 

After the levels have been formed by cutting and scraping, plaster bandage is used to cover, I use about 3 layers to get a nice finish and mainly use hands and fingers rather than tools to get the look I want.

 

post-4738-0-56031400-1356806646_thumb.jpg

 

The Potton Road Bridge covers a board joint and so I have had to try and make it removable, which so far has proved to be the hardest thing to do. Hopefully this time I have been successful.........

The Celotex has been cut at the board joints but the bandage has crossed it, after it has had a coat of paint as ground cover I will use a razor saw to cut the bandage.

 

Sadly due to the dust I have not run anything for a while, but that should change soon.

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Great to see an update, Dave.

 

Happy New Year, and looking forward to seeing you progress through 2013.

 

Scott

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Hi Chris ... er, Dave!

 

Just had an enjoyable read through of your thread to get up to date. All power to your elbow to continue with your ECML recreation in 2013 (maybe it'll get a tad easier when her ladyship's period in office ends?!). Looking forward to seeing some prototypical train formations running through Sandy.

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Well I've managed to get some more work done over the last few weeks, when I was carrying it out, it felt like I was achieving lots, but when I downloaded the photo's and compared to the last update it looks like i've spent about 5 minutes on it !!

 

post-4738-0-06263000-1358798998_thumb.jpg

 

This is looking South, I have filled the bandage some more and given it a coat of watercolours, Burnt umber is the main colour then some darker shades dry brushed on. The idea is when it is grassed it should give a variation in the colour rather than just one shade, let's see if it works !

I labouriously brush painted the sides of the rails with rust then fired up the airbrush to give the sleepers a coat of "weathered grime" as I progress onto the next board I will probably just spray the weathered grime on the main lines and pick out a few sidings for the rust treatment, with some having more than others. I'm pleased with the results but don't think it's warranted on the rest as I want to avoid the "too much paint look" which can make the sleepers and chairs have that "garmed up" look about them.

post-4738-0-16651800-1358799010_thumb.jpg

This is the start of ballasting.......oh joy of joys..... this is not something I was looking forward to. I have a tool which lays about 90% but there is still cleaning up to do, so much is left on top of the sleeper and when it is brushed off it also picks ballast out from between them, there is then too little between the sleepers so you have to try and brush more back in, which then means there is some on the sleepers, which then has to brushed off.....you get the picture !! round and round I go.

I have yet to find a method I am happy with and am open to suggestions.

When I finally got a look I was happy with I gave it a light spray of water then the usual pva/water/drop of fairy to fix it, vacuumed off after a day or so and I am happy with the result, just a couple of places where the glue didn't penetrate but overall better than I thought it would be.

post-4738-0-20725000-1358799021_thumb.jpg

Just a bit more to do on the "branch" then I have to start on the GN, this will be interesting as the GN's track was a lot tidier with immaculate ballast shoulders (masking tape at the ready) and just to the top of the sleepers...........I see a problem brewing here......

I shall try and get some more done this week as we are going away on holiday at the end of the week and I'd like to come back to a "new" board to start on. The grass will wait until I have purchased a static applicator, there is so much to do it is worth buying one. I have looked at Fur etc but I love the look of the static grasses.

 

Oh well back to the room.

 

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This looks realy nice so far. Living localy i have an interest in anything in the area and this is nice to see.

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It`s great watching the scenery develop, my favorite part and will watch with interest!

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I don't know how I have missed this!!

 

Living one station down from you, I will have to keep a close eye on the developments.

 

Keep it going, it looks like it's going to be a cracker.

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Keep it going, it looks like it's going to be a cracker.

 

 

If I get it wrong though you could retype that with 2 P's  :jester:

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I've just uploaded a set of pics from a school vist to Sandy in 1963

 

I hope they are of some use

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Magnificent. 

Edited by LNERGE

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Absolutely brilliant - so evocative of the Sandy I know from my trainspotting days. Take note how clean & tidy everything looks too.

 

Stewart

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There was still track on the Cambridge - Oxford line in the time i was trainspotting here. I remember it being lifted too (1970-75?) I was 4 to 9 years old. It was a super place to watch trains.

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I should have said that the visit to take the pics was by train from Oxford.

 

Dave

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I've just uploaded a set of pics from a school vist to Sandy in 1963

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/unravelled/sets/72157632593868526/

 

I hope they are of some use

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Absolutely superb, thanks you for that, it's the small details that shots like that reveal which are most helpful.

 

I love this site and those on it !

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<SNIP>This is the start of ballasting.......oh joy of joys..... this is not something I was looking forward to. I have a tool which lays about 90% but there is still cleaning up to do, so much is left on top of the sleeper and when it is brushed off it also picks ballast out from between them, there is then too little between the sleepers so you have to try and brush more back in, which then means there is some on the sleepers, which then has to brushed off.....you get the picture !! round and round I go.

I have yet to find a method I am happy with and am open to suggestions.<SNIP>

 

The 2mm Association have a new book out called "Track How it works and how to model it". I posted a review on the books section and there is a link for you to buy it from the society.

They have an ingenious suggestion of mounting a brush inside an offcut of softwood with a nut to set the height. That would allow you to run the block over the rails and the tip of the brush just touches the sleepers without going below them. Its on p116 Fig 9.4.

 

Hope that helps. I like the layout.

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The 2mm Association have a new book out called "Track How it works and how to model it". I posted a review on the books section and there is a link for you to buy it from the society.

They have an ingenious suggestion of mounting a brush inside an offcut of softwood with a nut to set the height. That would allow you to run the block over the rails and the tip of the brush just touches the sleepers without going below them. Its on p116 Fig 9.4.

 

Hope that helps. I like the layout.

 

Thanks for the idea Richard I'll look it up and give that a go.

 

I've tried laying the brush flat, dragging it and other ways, but every now and then it drops between the sleepers and scoops a load out. I think the best way is to lay PVA then lay the track and ballast at the same time, but I couldn't do that as I would lay and fettle it, then alter the radius until I was happy.

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I've just uploaded a set of pics from a school vist to Sandy in 1963

 

Now that's what I call a school visit! (I only ever got taken to Hadrian's wall and the Houses of Parliament!!) Thanks for sharing with us all ;)

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Not heard it mentioned for many years, but I lay my ballast dry, then spray with water. Nowadays the method seems to be use an eyedropper to drop pva glue on to the ballast..

 

The ballast is pre-mixed with powder glue (Cascomite or equivalent), and brushed into position. Then a spray bottle (say an empty Windolene bottle) is filled with water which is "thinned" with a drop of washing up liquid to reduce surface tension. This is the used to really soak the ballast/glue mix. A period of drying time is needed before the whole thing sets.

 

A spray at low pressure like this doesn't disturb the ballast, unlike using the dropping of pva onto the ballast. An old-fashioned way of doing the job which seems to be largely forgotten nowadays.

 

Stewart

Edited by stewartingram
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