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I have read up all the previous postings on this topic but I would just like some clarification. I have not really considered track in detail before but I realise that I have hit a minefield with all the issues arrising.

 

Starting from my finishing point I am building the scenic section of a layout that is one continuous track with two doubleback loops. The scenic section is a four track semi derlict station. Each train will pass through four times, twice in each direction. I hope to run at least six trains (DCC) simultaneously at exhibitions so that there is non stop action with holding sidings to rest trains out of sight once they have been around the layout. All trains will be spaced by multiple aspect signalling that will enable operators to drive their train safely. I even have a crazy idea of making the layout interactive so that a member of the public can take control of a train within the busy mainline! The trackwork although relatively simple is an area that I have neglected in the past. I am no expert so I won't be doing anything too advanced!

 

I am new to code 75 and I am begining to realise that this is not straightforward. I can space the sleepers on the plain line but what is the spacing in mm? I am resigned to off the shelf points so do I gradually close up the spacings when getting near to the points? Will this look strange? On the up and down slow lines I want jointed track. Are 60ft lengths prototypical? Can I get away with painting the Peco fishplates weathered black to represent the real thing? One of my formations is a long milk train and I really want to emphasize the sound of the wheels on the joints; has anyone ever tried to represent dipped joints to aid this? I thought about filing down the rail ends on the joints to create a rougher ride. Lastly has anyone any can't deficiency specifications? Life was simpler before I took an interest in track? I'd rather do the scenery!

 

I am happy for any advice on the above. Someone has the answers!

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Would changing from concrete to wooden sleepers near or at the S&C help take peoples mind off the change in sleeper spacing?

 

60'-0" rails have been standard for jointed track for a hundred years, except on minor lines in some very rural areas where shorter rails were used to reduce the weight to be lifted as there was less manpower available. You sometimes find rails welded up into 120' and even 180' lengths but this is not considered good practice these days.

 

Remember there are rules to laying jointed track, sleeper type not to be changed within two sleepers of a joint, avoid putting joints on under bridges. If you need a short closure to meet up with say some S&C, do not put in one pair of very short closures, use two pairs of medium length ones instead. Fit breather switches where welded track meets jointed or older designs of S&C . etc etc

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Exactoscale do 00 gauge track bases using code 75 bullhead rail. The sleepers are 1.6mm thick so should match up with Peco points. Their height is 4.7mm from bottom of the sleeper to the top of the rail.

 

Should be easy to fit to Peco points using code 75 rail joiners. Exactoscale do nice little plastic fish plates which should fit code 75fb rail, but each section will need a wire dropper.

 

Unless you rebuild the Peco points as per Andy's thread, they will look different. Having said that once ballasted and painted from a distance I doubt if anyone will notice

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I thought about filing down the rail ends on the joints to create a rougher ride.

 

:no: :no: keep files away from your Code 75 track - if you are using rail joiners the small expansion gap will be sufficient to create a rattle. If you file down the edges expect to see most of your stock bouncing along on the sleepers. That is if the wheels can negotiate the accumulation of dirt/rust/other debris that will be fouling up the electrical continuity.

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On the up and down slow lines I want jointed track. Are 60ft lengths prototypical? Can I get away with painting the Peco fishplates weathered black to represent the real thing? One of my formations is a long milk train and I really want to emphasize the sound of the wheels on the joints; has anyone ever tried to represent dipped joints to aid this?

 

In real life, if you stand near a joint, that's primarily what you'll hear, as the other joints are as you rightly say, 60' away. However, on a model, this equates to only 240mm in 4mm scale, thus you'll hear multiple rail joints and the effect will be completely lost. Unless you've got your head very close to the track!

 

Lay the track as normal and if you feel the need to add a "noisy" joint, then cut a very small V in the rail head with a needle file.

 

Cheers,

Mick

Edited by newbryford
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You should not need too many points on the scenic section which should make things easier.

 

You should have no problem letting the public have a go as long as you have enough operators to control the rest of the trains. The public are quite capable of driving trains on DCC through long underground tunnels with a little encouragement.

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