Jump to content

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, hayfield said:

The Exactoscale timbers are cheap enough £2

Hi Hayfield, thanks for that, some real bargains on the EMGS shop, sleepers and rail ordered.

Paul.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, down the sdjr said:

Hi Hayfield, thanks for that, some real bargains on the EMGS shop, sleepers and rail ordered.

Paul.

 

 

Paul

 

No problems, I use a lot of the Exactoscale special chairs and their plastic timbers are my first choice. I am changing my allegiance on 2 and 3 bolt chairs as C&L have the edge with their new sprues 

 

348.jpeg.fa89f020098aea467fc110b807823c33.jpeg

 

I am going a step back in time, as I have some old fashioned 00/H0 coarser scale turnouts to build using code 100 rail

 

349.jpeg.785be4c8bd4c32feb6736444a6682de2.jpeg

 

Code 100 fb is a bit like working with 0 gauge rail, but on 3mm size turnouts when 24" radius was generous

 

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

24.jpeg.65ea23f43fd6bc3dd9dd693e52b76a11.jpeg

 

Very untidy workbench, old 00/H0 code 100 complex finished, hoping the radii are not too sharp and check rails will allow coarse scale RTR wheels through (I knew I should have kept that solid wheel Jinty chassis

 

Plan on the bench is a guide for a modern image turnout

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

An answer you will not want is a Small GW Models sheet metal roller, as the small one has slots at one end

 

Try rolling a round item (Pole or pipe) over it as you would a piece of sheet metal, I think the surface you roll it on must have some give in it. Other than this just curve it by sliding between your thumb and first two fingers 

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, hayfield said:

Try rolling a round item (Pole or pipe) over it as you would a piece of sheet metal, I think the surface you roll it on must have some give in it.

 

 

I recommend a bottle of Worcestershire Sauce on a mouse mat.

 

Martin.

  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, hayfield said:

Does it make the mat taste better?

Don't know, but it enhances the flavour of the mouse (or rat...).

Edited by St Enodoc
  • Funny 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

25.jpeg.7d4ecf1969a4c95fceb0051a4ffe1d11.jpeg

 

Started a modern style flatbottom turnout using Exactoscale plastic timbers and Peco pandrol clips with EMGS code 83 fb rail

27.jpeg.a066fb48e126053059f07b25dbc97ca3.jpeg

 

Making the common crossing was interesting, but seemed to come out fine, the Peco Pandrol clips are not very apparent

 

28.jpeg.1ebf1bccb5cdc2391782f8bf76832517.jpeg

 

00SF code 75 bullhead gauges work fine (code 82 FB gauges are too narrow)

 

29.jpeg.1930e6e94e3083a20d071cc9ef30d20f.jpeg

 

Various gauges used, the 3 point gauges are useful for holding the rail in place

 

30.jpeg.6b365164c93d4e6c35bcbe8fb74e5930.jpeg

 

Nearly finished, bonding wires and a copperclad tiebar masquerading as a timber needs fabricating

 

31.jpeg.23a5a55650e95a23e277572a1b7939f8.jpeg

 

Where possible I used some Exactoscale special chair parts

 

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John,

 

That FB rail looks more like bullhead in the pics -- the foot of FB rail should be double the width of the head (5.5" and 2.75" wide). Am I missing something?

 

It's a bit late to tell you, sorry, but Heavy Rail standard-gauge FB track in the UK doesn't bend the ends of the wing and check rails -- the flare angle is machined into the head of the rail:

 

fb_flares.png.76942b0f972f0850b57acdf63863067a.png

 

 

Also, Templot can print the rail foot on the templates (brown areas above). This makes it easier to align FB rail over the template. The settings are at:

 

fb_flares1.png.4b5e63daa34a4670ab6e3a7483314109.png

 

Templot doesn't automatically change to machined flares because bent ends is correct for narrow-gauge, light rail and industrial tracks.

 

p.s. the rail-foot lines show only on the final printed templates, not on the screen, and not when printing the control template.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin

 

Thanks for the info, both about the foot and the flare. Too late. Also I thought the rail was a bit loose in the chairs but the solvent seems to shrink the clips tightening them up

 

The EMGS code 83 rail was requested, the foot is the same size as the head, makes fabrication so much easier

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, hayfield said:

The EMGS code 83 rail was requested, the foot is the same size as the head, makes fabrication so much easier

 

 

Hi John,

 

You have lost me there. If the foot is the same width as the head, it is bullhead rail, not flat-bottom.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin

 

Supplied by the EMGS as Code 83, the foot is certainly the same width and very slim, I have just checked the invoice and it clearly states code 83 flat bottom, but its nothing like Peco's !!!

 

I have emailed the EMGS now and query it. I thought stupidly the code 83 was to a slightly different profile to code 82.

Edited by hayfield
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe they supplied code75 bullhead by mistake. Does it measure 0.075" (1.9mm), or 0.082" (2.1mm) height?

 

I'm puzzled why they call it code 83? For UK flat-bottom rails 6.25" height it should be code 82.

 

(Code 83 is 3.5mm/ft scale for American rails.)

 

Martin.

  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, martin_wynne said:

Maybe they supplied code75 bullhead by mistake. Does it measure 0.075" (1.9mm), or 0.082" (2.1mm) height?

 

I'm puzzled why they call it code 83? For UK flat-bottom rails 6.25" height it should be code 82.

 

(Code 83 is 3.5mm/ft scale for American rails.)

 

Martin.

Martin

 

I took it at face value, stupid I wrongly assumed it to be a different profile and the foot is so slim which slightly differs from some earlier rail I have

 

My digital caliper's battery is dead (might be the caliper) but using it as a feeler gauge with a piece of older code 75 bh rail its the same,

 

32.jpeg.a5fe4b92a214ac8a59145bf2d23ca2d8.jpeg

 

Top code 82 fb

lower what's obviously not code 83fb, still I can alter the wing rails and I assume the check rails are also machined

 

Thanks for spotting the error

  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 30/08/2020 at 17:14, hayfield said:

Keep up the good work, curviform Vees next?

Had a break with works doing to the house, so had some time this week, had a go at a curviform. Still having problems with the V jig. Finding getting the formation square to 1mm difficult. Practise, practise.IMG_20201013_201753.jpg.861c9b1fc49a1bf7c4f62958bb067f9f.jpg

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

93.jpeg.745b2c5727769d09b1f82d3654abf629.jpeg91.jpeg.7e8daf264c36a9778c4c342a5b44c27e.jpeg

 

A few weeks back I received the correct rail from the EMGS, so the B8  started again. Code 83 rail is a tight fit into the pandrol fittings

 

92.jpeg.c9c27c414d556ca7472f31ac01a3d279.jpeg94.jpeg.cefde5257769b7efc08a16b6875543c7.jpeg

 

I fitted the missing timber as a working tiebar, copperclad timber and brass slide chairs

 

95.jpeg.c767fc51d200507cd888da2f5bef5c0a.jpeg

 

The past 2 days have been organizing my work room, or at least starting to. Brought on by my purchase of a Unimat Metal Line mini lathe, but also it was getting very untidy

 

96.jpeg.1953b728e3eb18434f92c82444a15c83.jpeg

 

Very much work in progress, I need a new wheel and motor spares storage system as they are taking up so much space

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

97.jpeg.b243697bba4848042ed61e4c68a9a347.jpeg

 

A very cruel enlargement, however last week these two Exactoscale 00 track gauges were a solid lump of rust. Well all those hours watching the Repair Shop, Salvage Hunters the Restorers etc were not wasted, they have had about a week pickling in white vinegar, been given a blow torch (after the springs had been removed) a blast with WD40, a wire brushing eventually a light oil

 

These gauges whilst are not the prettiest things are now usable. The main things are firstly they have no check rail slots, secondly the pressure from the springs can be eased off to allow the rail head to rotate. Just glad I did not throw them out

  • Like 3
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

98.jpeg.01e13a19c23b6f4c85ae11f6ae2a7cd9.jpeg

 

A quick search through my gauge box found 2 more later versions of the Exactoscale oo sprung track gauges, one thought is I could perhaps turn some center sections for some 12mm gauges for a narrow gauge loco I have

 

99.jpeg.465ebee1b58e250c642614ab6a2a1b84.jpeg

 

A set of much earlier Exactoscale (pre Len Numan) 00 track gauges, left a 3 point gauge right a straight track gauge. I bought these from Puffers of Kenton in the 70's

 

100.jpeg.de4e4c20dc79007c747b05ce492a9758.jpeg

 

Another set of early Exactoscale gauge, in this case check rail gauges. I have better check rail gauges in 00, (which are 00SF ones but both gauges share the same measurement) so again may form the basis of being adapted.

  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Junctionmad said:

What’s the purpose of the spring on the gauges 

 

The gauges are made up of washers and tubes on a bolt, depending on how tight the spring is compressed dictates how tight the gauge grips the rail. For copperclad construction a tight fit holds the rail upright, The reason I guess is that whilst the gap between the rails has to be exact, the stepper end washers cab be slightly under gauge, so the exact tolerance is the tube (the gauge - the width of 2 washers

 

This shows anyone can make a gauge with commonly available washers with only the tube having to be exact, provided the center washers are under the width of the rail

 

The benefit for chaired construction is that you can have a light spring which will allow the head of the rail to rotate to allow for the cant of the rail.

 

101.jpeg.77a252f7e7db0d74188c7a55f13c29b9.jpeg102.jpeg.ee350696a8b51f96f8f6ed7a06736d7a.jpeg

 

The 2 end washers are stepped, the thicker part 1.86mm and the lip 1.11mm. I have just measured a piece of code 75 rail which is .94mm, so the flange is slightly thinner than the rail. The bolt is just under 3.5mm.

No doubt someone will know the technical reasons, but as you can see its so easy to make your own gauges

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John/JM

 

I had a pair of gauges very similar to those which came with some other bits I bought a few years back and I couldn't see the point in them at all.

 

Unless someone is very experienced in setting that spring exactly right then they are going to give themselves a problem. Likewise, how many people swap between copper clad and functional often enough to justify a 'one tool does all' gauge? There are of course people like your good self who use many different techniques, but surely a set of proper gauges for each job is a better option.

 

This really looks like trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

 

Derek

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.