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Redbridge Wharf by Winchester Railway Modellers

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Winchester Railway Modellers are a moderate sized club with around 30 active members with a wide range of interests. The club has a large 0 gauge layout (Abbotstone) which is currently on the exhibition circuit, an EM gauge layout (Mawgan Porth) in an advanced state of construction and a large 00 gauge layout (Itchen Vale). Originally it was the club's intention to exhibit the 00 layout but a number of the core team have been lost and in recent years construction work has largely stopped.

 

With a recent influx of new members with an interest in 00 it was decided to reassess the situation and see how best to harness the enthusiasm and get the new team engaged. The existing layout though operational was experiencing some issues, major ones being some sagging/distortion of baseboards and concerns over the wiring. The group came to the conclusion that they could not realistically complete the existing layout to a standard suitable for exhibition though they were keen to keep it running.

 

So what was to be done? As is the case for all modellers space was a concern. If we weren't going to remove the existing layout where would we build another one and how would we work on it and store it? Various options were discussed and we convinced ourselves we could shoehorn in another layout into the already crowded rooms although we would not be able to fully assemble it except at exhibitions or at external venues for special working sessions.

 

So what did the group want from the new layout?

 

The group had a meeting of all interested parties on the 9th February 2011 and several matters were agreed as a starting point for all proposals.

 

1. The layout should be attractive to exhibition managers in terms of its content and its size.

2. Track work and points (at least in the visible sections) should be code 75 or finer standards.

3. All members would be encouraged to participate and "building" items at the club room to share expertise will be "encouraged".

4. The "main" section would be erected in the OO room with the possibility of the fiddle yards being fitted for running sessions elsewhere or at exhibitions.

5. The layout should be usable with conventional DC or DCC control and if possible should allow the incorporation of new developments in the hobby, such as train detection and computer control, over time.

6. Ideally, the layout should incorporate provision for flexibility and expandability (scenic boards, fiddle yards, continuous runs) should more space become available.

7. The cost to club funds for manufacture should be possible over a reasonable construction period.

8. The "man hours" to produce (even if constructed in stages) should be available.

9. The ability to transport the layout at low cost (members cars) is highly desirable.

 

From this starting point the group went off for several weeks and dug around for inspiration for a layout that would meet our requirements and hopefully be a bit different as well. A number of themes/ideas were put forward and further work done before then evaluating the options to decide on what should be built.

 

To be continued...

Edited by eldavo

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After much discussion the group decide to pursue a proposal to build a model based on the real location of the now demolished Redbridge Sleeper works. A working title for the project is “Redbridge Wharfâ€.

 

The real location sits on the Northern shore of Southampton Water at the mouth of the river Test. There has been wharf in this location for several hundred years and the railways moved into the area in the late 1800s. Initially the railways used this area as a holding place for materials as the route developed West then moved to the manufacture of sleepers, bridge timbers and cast track components. In the final years the site was used for the assembly of long welded rail sections and the laying out of large pointwork complexes.

 

Alongside the works is a small passenger station, exchange sidings and the junction of the Romsey and Bournemouth lines.

 

The location offers great potential for an exhibition layout in terms of originality, variety of traffic movements and scenic elements. While we are aware of layouts that depict engineers yards we are not aware of any layout on the exhibition circuit depicting a location that manufactures sleepers, componentry and track sections.

 

In addition to the numerous photographs covering all periods of time, the group have acquired:

 

· OS Maps

· Site Plans

· Track Diagrams

· Signalling Diagrams

· Working Timetables

· Access to the recollections of staff who worked at the depot

 

Also, there is the very comprehensive book “Making Tracks†by Mr.Fairman that deals with all aspects of the depot from initial construction through to the closure in 1989. It contains many diagrams and photographs.

 

The basic model would encompass a scenic section of around 16 feet with additional fiddleyards and approach curves fitted to the ends for exhibition use. The baseboards would be built as units approximately 4' x 2' 6†supporting the trackbed and scenic items and housing all electrical gubbins. It should be possible to construct these using lightweight techniques of “open top†plywood frames or foam core with ply cladding (a' la' Pempoul).

 

The prototype location is quite deep from river frontage to station and thus to increase the effective depth of the model it was proposed to use additional daughter/extension boards that can be fitted to the front of the layout. These boards would not carry any track but would simply extend the scenic depth of the layout and thus could be built of lightweight materials. As it is proposed to operate the layout from the rear these extensions would not affect operation but would significantly improve the visual impression.

 

Several concept sketches and trackplans were produce the following being one of them:

 

post-7010-0-55302300-1341172420.jpg

 

In this sketch the pink areas are the main scenic baseboards, green are "daughter" or extension boards and the blue areas the return curves to the fiddleyard(s).

 

To be continued...

Edited by eldavo
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The main elements of the layout would include some or all of the following:

 

1. A representation of Redbridge station.

- Two short platforms

- Level crossing

- Signal box

2. The junction of the Bournemouth and Romsey lines

- The protoype has a tight curve and currently uses a switched diamond

3. A section of the Solent/River Test

- Mudflats

- Salt marshes

- Bridge/causeway under the Bournemouth line

4. The sleeper works.

- The wharf alongside the Test where boats and tugs bring timber to the site.

- The Timber Pond where wood would be left to season.

- The creosote pressure vessels with narrow gauge track and wagons.

- The Furnace where chairs etc were cast.

- The various stores and buildings.

- The component recovery siding/area.

- Large gantry cranes and smaller and “odd†equipment to stock sleepers.

- Weld test equipment.

- Layout areas where point formations were prefabricated (perfect for the efforts of new track/point building members that don’t meet the required running standards)

 

A feature of the model would be the “through†mainline trackwork that would include 3rd rail electric equipment. This trackwork would probably most appropriately be constructed using flat bottom rail whilst all other areas would be bullhead. Much of the track in the works area is likely to be inset or roughly ash ballasted and could reasonably be built cheaply and easily using copperclad sleepers and solder construction. Mainline trackwork and the sidings track linkages from the main to the works would best be constructed using chair components.

 

The layout can be wired for the use of either conventional DC or DCC control though it is not proposed to use both at the same time in order to avoid any sudden emissions of magic smoke from locos or controllers.

 

For testing purposes in the clubrooms it is proposed that some very basic cassette-based fiddleyards are constructed. These could also be used for initial exhibition attendances. Over time these cassettes would be replaced with a large stock yard style fiddleyard in a roundy-roundy configuration.

 

Such a roundy-roundy fiddleyard set up would permit far more intensive operations with less stock handling. This format would also lend itself to investigating semi or fully automated operation of the mainline and Romsey branch.

 

Operational interest

 

A key feature of the Redbridge location is the variety of traffic that has and still does pass through.

 

Passenger includes:

 

· Express and semi fast –Waterloo to Bournemouth and Weymouth (including the Bournemouth Belle Pullman).

· Stopping trains to and from Bournemouth

· Eastleigh and Southampton to Romsey and Salisbury

· Brighton and Portsmouth to Plymouth and Cardiff (via Romsey and Salisbury)

· Brighton to Bournemouth

 

Freight includes

 

· Fawley Oil tankers

· Marchwood - Armoured tanks and other military traffic

· Wool – sand

· Ballast from Eastleigh virtual quarry to all points West

· Southampton Docks to Salisbury, the West, Bristol and Wales

· Local traffic towards Bournemouth and Salisbury

 

In addition to this through traffic the works generates a large range of traffic of it's own:

 

IN

· Timber

· Pig iron

· Coke

· Creosote

· Fuel oil

· Rail

· Old trackwork for component recovery

 

OUT

· Sleepers

· Track componentry

· Point formations

· Welded rail (now there's a challenge!)

· Scrap

 

The list above covers a number eras and, assuming the mainline has 3rd rail, the earliest date that the layout could reasonably be run is around 1966/65 when the electrification was being added. The “juice†wasn't turned on until 1967. The site was in use until 1989 and with a stretch of imagination, and assuming closure was avoided, it could be run right up to the present day.

 

Operational eras could include:

 

1967

 

The steam diesel transition where a large range of steam, green diesel and electric motive power could be used:

 

· A large variety of ex SR types

· Most BR standards (including 9F on the Fawley oil trains and van specials).

· Ex LMS Class 5 on the Inter Regional passenger trains that were transferred from the S&D.

· Ex GWR Hall and Grange types on the inter regional traffic.

· Running –in turns from Eastleigh works

· Hampshire DMU’s

· Crompton (Type 33) diesels

· Hymek/Warship

· Works shunters – Steam: B4, O2, USA dock tank, steam cranes

 

1975

 

The “blue diesel†era:

 

· CEPs, VEPs and first gen DMUs

· Crompton (Type 33) diesels

· Class 47

· Hymek/Warship

· Works shunters – Diesel: 03, 04, 06, 08, steam cranes

 

1988

 

Later BR period:

 

· CEPs, VEPs and DMUs in Network SouthEast and Regional Railways liveries

· Class 33, 47 and other diesels in Large logo, RES and Railfreight liveries

· Works shunters – Diesel: 03, 04, 06, 08

 

2000+

 

Contemporary:

 

· Class 442, 444 & 450 in SouthWest Trains livery

· Class 158, 159, 153 in First Great Western and several other liveries

· Class 59, 60, 66, 67, 70 and 73 in EWS, Freightliner, GBrF

· Works shunters – Diesel: 08

 

 

In addition to the standard traffic in recent times the line has seen regular steam specials and oddball loco convoys to and from the Swanage branch.

 

Visual interest

 

The scope for visual interest is immense. The proposal suggests the public view across a section of the River Test/Southampton Water as though they are looking from Marchwood. This puts the wharf as the centre point with the works behind and Redbridge station to the rear. Key elements are:

 

· The wharf with a gantry crane, mobile steam/diesel cranes and numerous piles of timber and concrete sleepers and a barge.

· The river itself with salt marshes, mudflats, water and the causeway to Bournemouth to the viewers left.

· The timber pond (a frequent feature of US logging layouts but a novelty on a UK layout).

· The foundry and associated buildings.

· The high pressure creosote plant with narrow gauge feed tracks running into the pressure vessels.

· The weld tester.

· Point complexes being assembled in the yard.

· Masses of oddball equipment and clutter!

 

 

Cheers

Dave

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This sounds like a very interesting project. It is clear you have done a fair amount of research of the area. When I was a child we met an Auntie of mine at Southampton docks she had been returning from Rhodesia. I can't remember the exact location and it must have been around the mid to late 1960's but I distinctly remember the railway was inset in the road and I saw a shunting engine trundle along with I think wagons in tow.

 

Dockside layouts have thus always held a fascination for me and I look forward to seeing the development of yours.

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Sounds like a really interesting project with lots of potential.

 

Just to add a bit to the 1975 'blue era' - there will have been the inter-regional trains to Liverpool, Manchester and Newcastle Monday to Friday which would be B/G mark 1s at that time. Summer Saturdays would bring workings to/from other northern destinations.

 

There would also be the Channel Island boat train which would have been booked for a class 74, but frequently produced a class 73.

 

You didn't mention 4Reps and TCs which would be the usual non-stop EMUs through Redbridge. Ceps weren't unknown along this part of BR(S) at that time, but would have been a rarity.

 

HTH

 

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Thanks Russ. All suggestions welcomed and that adds yet more to the variety of workings.

 

Cheers

Dave

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A few pics of the real Redbridge as it is today (or at least 2011) to give folks a flavour.

This is the view from the station footbridge looking East towards Milbrook and Southampton. The main running lines with the 3rd rail are clearly visible and the stationmaster's house is still in place although now a private residence. Coincidentally our club chairman used to lodge his dog with a dogsitter who lived in the stationmaster's house.

The site of the sleeper works was to the right and is now a large storage area for import/export cars and vans.

post-7010-0-95485300-1504005993.jpg

Looking the other way towards the West we can see the where the access to the yard meets the main line, the junction with the Romsey line (diverging to the right) and the main lines running across the causeway towards Totton and onwards to Bournemouth.

The remains of the road access to the yard can be seen crossing the lines behind the speed restriction board. Originally there was a signal box alongside this access approximately where the blue container is sited.

post-7010-0-91084600-1504006003.jpg

In the view below, again looking East, can be seen the lines behind the down platform that connect in the distance with the 3 "Elephant" sidings. These sidings now connect with Southampton Maritime container terminal which is just visible in the far distance in the first photo. On the righthand line can be seen the remains of a turnout giving access to the sleeper works.

post-7010-0-37020000-1504006038.jpg

Some of the original wharf area has been made into a public park accessed by way of the railway footbridge which means you can get down to the waterside. Here's the view looking East down Southampton water towards the container terminal. The pilings in the water are close to the position of the original log pond where large pieces of timber were seasoned. As large areas of land have been recovered the shape of the shoreline here has changed numerous times but the line of the wharf is still much as it has been for over a century.

post-7010-0-58749800-1504006019.jpg

Looking in the other direction we can see the causeway, with its two low bridges, carrying the main line over the mouth of the river test with the road bridges behind it.

post-7010-0-29708100-1504006028.jpg

Cheers
Dave

Edited by eldavo
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Looking forward to developments. Interestingly, the overgrown area immediately behind the east end of the up platform is the only visible remnant of the Southampton arm of the Andover-Redbridge Canal.

Pete

 

http://www.whitenap.plus.com/sarum/ss_ind.htm

 

Edited to add link

Edited by petethemole

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Great idea for a layout, and an interesting read on the rational behind it.

 

Post #7, Picture No 3 - how does that catch point work ? It looks as if the wheels would be forced both sides of the running rails, rather than off to one side, which would surely cause far more infrasturcture damage ?

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As is recognised above, a fair amount of research has been carried out. Also, there was an earlier thread on RM Web that asked for any recollections of workings, particularly in the yard pre 1967.

 

Any memories, however short, would be very welcome.

 

Thank you in anticipation.

 

Eddie

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... Post #7, Picture No 3 - how does that catch point work ? It looks as if the wheels would be forced both sides of the running rails, rather than off to one side, which would surely cause far more infrasturcture damage ?

 

As far as we can make out it's a compromise. It's a low speed area but needs to protect against trains/stock exiting to the main running line. The rollingstock will indeed try and pinch the track but using a conventional trap the stock would either be routed towards the run round loop to the right or towards the back of the platform to the left. With this device there is more chance of an escaped vehicle stopping pretty much on line even if there is the possibility of some line damage.

 

Cheers

Dave

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A few notes on our chosen baseboard construction techniques. None of these are new simply rehashes of work done by others many of whom are on RMweb.

During our initial discussions the team identified a couple of challenges, the fact that the layout would not be able to be erected permanently in the clubrooms and the fact that we wanted to transport it for exhibition use. Both of these meant that whatever we constructed would need to be easily shiftable by a bunch of old duffers! Baseboard units needed to be of a manageable size and as light as possible while remaining strong and durable. Some of the club's other efforts have certainly proved to be strong and durable but have used fairly hefty section ply and/or MDF meaning that more than one set of hands is needed to move a baseboard.

After searching the interweb, trawling magazines and peering at other peoples layouts the team decided to try their hand at building the main scenic baseboards using high density foam. A well-known example of a layout that has used this technique that is on the exhibition circuit is Pempoul. Those who have a had a close look at it will attest that the system works well and the boards look to be holding up extremely well to being lifted and shifted on a regular basis.

Magazine articles on the use of foam were duly perused, an order for several 1220x600mm sheets of 25mm foam was placed with Trylon and a member dispatched to a local timber merchant to acquire sheets of 3mm and 6mm birch ply.

post-7010-0-47583600-1504006312.jpg

Our boards for the scenic section use a core of 25mm thick foam which is 1220x760mm and forms the top surface of the board. This is glued to two side pieces of 25mm foam 100mm deep forming a 'U' section. As the sheets only come in 600mm width there is a join along the length of the top surface and to help align and strengthen this a biscuit cutter is used and 2mm ply biscuits inserted. We have also used biscuits in the joins betwen the top and side pieces. All joins are glued using solvent-free grip fill adhesive, the cheapest available from Screwfix.

The 'U' shaped foam core is then clad in ply. Two layers of 6mm ply at each end, one butt jointed to the end of the foam and the other sitting inside the 'U' forming a support step at the end. The sides are then finished with a 125mm deep strip of 3mm ply simply to protect the foam from damage. Diagonal bracing is then added underneath the board from 3mm ply. Here's a pic of our first effort.

post-7010-0-00897100-1504006319.jpg

One of the first challenges we came across with this was locating where the diagonal braces should go. From the pic above you can see various holes and square markings. We pasted the Templot trackplan to the top of the board, poked holes through where the point actuator wire would need to go then marked the position of the Tortoise motor underneath. A bit messy but it allowed us to see where we could add bracing.

With the 2nd board wee got a we bit smarter. Again we pasted the Templot plan to the top...

post-7010-0-42702700-1504006336.jpg

...and also a mirror image to the bottom so we could fit the bracing without poking holes all over the place. It seemed a good idea to retrofit the plan to the underside of the first board as well to aid with the identification of wiring and point motors at a later date.

Here's a view of the underside of the first two boards:

post-7010-0-11558400-1504006344.jpg

Along the way we discovered a few things:

1) PVA glue will not stick a paper template to Trylon model foam!

To get PVA to stick you first need to size/prime/coat the foam in something. Surprisingly acrylic varnish (PVA-based) works well as a primer.

2) Almost all glues known to mankind disolve foam.

At least all the common, Evostick, UHU, etc. ones will distort if not disolve the stuff. There are specialsed but expensive glues available if there is a situation where you cannot use a solvent-free grip fill or PVA.

3) Without diagonal bracing the boards are useless and twist all over the place. With the bracing in place they are amazingly light and amazingly rigid.

4) Using a biscuit cutter on foam will guarantee that you will be extracting bits of foam from every orifice for days!

Cheers
Dave

Edited by eldavo

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Good stuff Dave, look forward to regular updates.

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Of course life would be easy if all the baseboards were nice simple rectangles but they aren't. At the lefthand (Bournemouth) end of the layout we intend to model a length of the causeway over the mouth of the river Test which means a large part of the baseboard will be substantially below trackbed level. This needed a bit of creativity as our initial foam construction would not accomodate it.

Our solution was to build a much shallower 'U' section in 25mm foam then add a section of 75mm foam to form the causeway and the banks of the river. As was mentioned earlier we will use scenic extension boards at the front to extend the width but these give us more problems in areas where we are modelling water. Long board joins will be almost impossible to hide or disguise.

For the causeway and wharf area we have decided to have the extension/daughter boards overlap parts of the main boards so that the join can be hidden under the causeway or along the edge of the wharf. This further complicates the shape of the boards and means we have had to construct a support framework out of 3mm ply as part of two of the main scenic boards.

Here is a pic of the causeway board under construction showing the very shallow 'U' shape and the way the diagonal braces form part of the daughter board support frame.

post-7010-0-94810000-1504006511.jpg

Looking at the top side some of the 75mm foam that makes up the causeway under the Bournemouth line and riverbank under the Romsey branch is visible. The sloping edge of the causeway will be built on the daughter board so that the board join will run along the edge of the trackbed and hopefully be almost invisble from normal viewing distances.

post-7010-0-98766000-1504006518.jpg

Cheers
Dave

Edited by eldavo

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Currently work is still on-going on the baseboards with the causeway board to complete and several daughter boards to build. In parallel with baseboard work the team have been working on trackwork.

One of our initial aims was to have better appearance and better running than we had with the existing Peco code 100 set-up. The exisiting layout was built at a time when the majority of the 00 gauge group had large collections of older stock including Lima models with pancake flanges. Code 100 may have been the right choice then but by todays standards it looks a bit course. As the team has changed dramatically, as have the sort of models we run, and we want to exhibit the final product we wanted something much better.

Much discussion ensued about the merits of various track systems but several of the group were keen on building our own track to get exactly what we wanted rather than compromise (except on gauge of course!). A lot of the team had never attempted trackwork construction before but were up for a challenge so handbuilt was the final decision. To add to the challenges we opted to use 00-SF standards in the pointwork to help further improve the appearance and running.

Of course that's not the end of it and there are many flavours of handbuilt. We decided to set the layout in around 1966-67 so that we could have 3rd rail but potentially run the odd bit of steam and green diesels. The line through Redbridge looks to have been flat-bottom rail at this time although the yard and sidings would be (and to some extent still are) bullhead. The layout depicts a track manufacturing plant after all so plenty of track variety would be nice.

We opted to build the mainline track with concrete sleepers on the up line and wooden on the down. For the concrete track we have used C&L sleeper bases so that bit is easy peasy. The wooden sleepered down line track, along with a crossover and the Romsey junction, is built using copperclad sleepers and Colin Craig etched brass chairs. The latter allow for some very tasty looking track but they are a route to madness. To say they are fiddly to assemble (two etched parts per chair) and use is understating it in the extreme!

Here is a shot of part of the Romsey junction under construction. It looks pretty messy with solder and flux staining but you can just about make out the etched chairs. The spring clip representations have not yet been bent over to meet the rail. For slide chairs, check rail chairs etc. we have used plain brass strip under the rail and etched chairs will be cut in half and added later.

post-7010-0-75924700-1504006752.jpg

Once completed the wooded sleepered track is cleaned, sprayed with a red oxide primer then the sleepers are individually painted and some variation of "rust" colour is added to the chairs and rails.

post-7010-0-55742900-1504006761.jpg

post-7010-0-92778400-1504006777.jpg

post-7010-0-92181200-1504006769.jpg

For the trackwork in the yard we are using bullhead rail threaded on to SMP track bases (cheaper than buying it ready assembled) and pointwork built using basic rail soldered to copperclad sleepers. Most of the track in the yard will be buried under various crud so adding chairs would be a bit of a waste of time. Using the simpler construction method has also meant that pretty much all the team have built at least one point so there's been plenty of new skills learnt.

Here's a pic of three of the 4 main boards laid out in the clubroom. It gives an idea of the sweep of the mainline across the rear of the layout but also highlights one of our day to day problems, space. The only place we can put together more than 2 boards is on top of the fiddleyard of the existing 00 layout. This has to be a temporary measure as we have members who regularly run the old layout during the week. Hence the reason for really lightweight baseboards.

post-7010-0-39236400-1504006785.jpg

Cheers
Dave

Edited by eldavo
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The majority of the pointwork on the layout is fairly simple and so many turnouts have been built individually which is nice an conveniemt for sharing out the work. There are a couple of crossovers that have been built as a combined unit but the only big chunk that really needed building as one piece is the double junction with the Romsey branch.

The trackwork here is flat-bottom rail and as it has to match with the rest of the mainline run it has been built using the Colin Craig etched chairs. Lots of them! It's been a fairly tedious job for one of our members to keep up a steady supply of assembled chairs so we could build this in a reasonable time. Just to add interest the junction includes a switched diamond crossing just like the real Redbridge. This little lot will need 4 Tortoise motors to drive it as the short blades on the diamond preclude the use of a single motor and cranks.

Here's the track assembled and waiting for a good bath to remove it from the Templot template and remove the flux residue. It was assembled on a sheet of plate glass to try and help get it as flat as possible.

post-7010-0-51198700-1504007037.jpg

post-7010-0-07108200-1504007048.jpg

After it's bath it will be checked electrically then some of the bits will be chemically blackened (well at least turned a mucky brown) and the whole thing will be given a coat of primer.

Cheers
Dave

Edited by eldavo
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As Dave has mentioned in earlier posts, after much deliberation a track plan was devised and track laying commenced.

 

Work was nearing completion when the Group looked into the locations of the “main scenic elements†as listed in the 3rd. Post and one of our members started to build card “mock ups†of some of the “must haves†including:

  • The creosote plant
  • The machine shop
  • The gantry crane

Said member had already built the (in)famous engine shed (the rear wall was demolished during a shunting operation) and a photograph of the shed and some of the “mock ups†are attached. The “sizing†of the real buildings deserves a Post in its own right. Suffice to say locating the scenic items on the constructed boards quickly highlighted that some modifications to the yard track layout were to accommodate buildings of a reasonable size.

 

During the process the decision as made to use N gauge as the track standard for the rails in the creosote plant. Although the final track layout has yet to be decided……

 

More to follow……………….. This is the first time i have attempted to add photopost-1025-0-27412500-1343935680_thumb.jpgpost-1025-0-30022600-1343937167_thumb.jpgpost-1025-0-23048800-1343937239_thumb.jpggraphs, hope they appear !

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Well done Eddie, started to take shape. Looking forward to seeing it progress.

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For those interested in the trackplan attached is a detailed view of the final version (I've lost count of what version we are on)

 

Main boards are shown in grey, daughter boards in yellow, and 'off-stage' in blue.

 

I may add another version with additional infrastructure shown to give an idea of what it is going to look like.

post-8166-0-75869600-1343941765_thumb.jpg

Edited by SouthernMafia
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I may add another version with additional infrastructure shown to give an idea of what it is going to look like.

 

Yes please Rich.

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Yes please Rich.

 

Gotta make it first! Tomorrow perhaps.

 

Note: The two stubs on board 3's daughter boards are dead roads and the points are fixed in the curved position, which is going to avoid some dodgy running across the daughter board join!

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Hi Dave,

 

Looks like a grand project you all have there, I shall follow this with interest. On the subject of sticking foam to foam or indeed other stuff, I have travelled this road too and found that there is a water based (ie: no solvents to melt foam) contact adhesive that seems to be freely available in most big DIY emporiums. Sorry if this is something you already know!

 

All the best,

 

Castle

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Nice job Rich, thank you.

 

Is the gantry crane going to be fixed, if not what's the extent of its run within the works?

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Overdue for an update.

 

Despite the lack of postings there has been a great deal of activity with point motors being installed and wired up, daughter boards constructed and track/points laid and ballasted.

 

Dave has completed the switched diamond that was shown under construction in an earlier post and Rich has completed (except the final cosmetics, painting/ballasting etc) the fully operational "Wide to Gauge Catch Point" a shown in Dave's photo (post # 7). A photo of the latter in the open position is attached.

 

 

 

Eddie

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