Jump to content

Modelling Narrow Gauge in 2mmFS/N-Scale


Recommended Posts

Hi all, I'm Cody, i'm 17 and from the USA. I model US prototype in N scale (sort-of), and i'm working on expanding my modelling of the UK (with a GWR pre-nationalization focus but with no loco to substantiate it) with a bit of narrow gauge modelling.

 

I've always liked narrow gauge, in particualr the narrow gauge lines in the English Isles with a special interest in the slate lines of Northern Wales.

Now i'm well aware that Welsh slate lines ran with a 2'3" gauge, and 6.5mm track is a few inches over 3', but i've not the skill or the finances to be entirely accurate.

I've a few bits for a marklin Z-Scale v60 (i've no clue what the model number is off-hand) that i'm looking to convert from a three axle diesel into a 0-4-0 steam loco, but need a couple gears to finish the actual chassis. The motor is a 12v 6mm x 12mm coreless motor and i've a pair of 45 degree bevel gears to allow for the motor to be mounted horizontally in the boiler but still move the vertical shaft for the worm-gear. Its not in any real put-together shape just yet, but if i find a way to get the gears i need, at least the rolling chassis can be put together.

 

For track i've a small circuit of Micro-Trains Z-scale track and one matching point, but for an acutal layout i'd like to use handlaid track. I've so far decided on using code 55 rail and have already bought some pre-weathered rail for handlaying track. The only problem is that with my limited finances, the issue of how to get ahold of suitable points is a re-occuring theme that keeps anything significant from materializing. Now, before you ask, the issue is that i don't have the finances to invest in the trial-and-error process of making my own points by hand (something i've never done).

 

I'd love to hear from anyone and everyone who is doing or has done any modelling in 2mmFS narrow gauge (Nn3) as to what they've done, how they did it, etc. Also if anyone has any sources for Nn3 items that are commercially made (preferably outside of associations or societies), based on UK, European, or japanese prototypes. That being said, when i say "commercially made" i mean anything from mass produced to 3d printed, to some basic etchings made by a lone modelling in his own work-space.

 

So far i'm familiar with NTasticShop and their wonderful 3d printed rolling stock (included that which is currently offered only through shapeways), and the stock and loco body kits made by Peco.

 

As for the work of modellers, i'm only familiar with the work of Mark Fielder as by his website that has proved to be my main inspiration in that it can be done, and by my own determination, will be done.

 

Furthermore, any help anyone can offer, be it sources of info, a contact, some loose bits collecting dust, or whatever else... i'd be more than happy to hear what you have to mention.

 

Thank You in advance to everyone who reads this and posts their thoughts here!

Also, feel free to send me a PM if you wish to do so.

 

Thanks Again!

 

-Cody F.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

An update/addition:

Seeing as how some folks have viewed what i've written above, and yet not one though, word, etc. I'd like to note that i do know the difference between 2mmFS (1:152.4), N-Gauge (1:148), and true N-Scale (1:160). If anyone was turned away by my seemingly lumping them all together, i apologize. I simply use all three terms do to the fact that there is a lack of an overall N-Gauge/Scale section, and that i simply use all three terms/tags to enable this topic to be found by a more broad range of people. If there is any desire for me to remove this topic from this section if even by only one person, i please ask that you voice this to me, be it in a reply here or a PM. I don't mean to offend, it is simply that as a modeller in the USA, the majority of items close to 2mm are N-Scale items and the usual term used for both N-Scale/Gauge and 2mm Narrow Gauge models is usually Nn3 due to its simpler designation. Again i apologize to everyone for any inconvenience and/or hurt feelings i may have caused.

 

Thank you for your time and hopefully your understanding

 

-Cody Fisher

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Cody,

 

I wouldn't worry that no-one has yet replied to your post. 2FS is not a huge interest group and narrow gauge modellers are a smaller subset of that so it may be a while before one of them spots your post and replies. I read it but didn't respond because I didn't feel I had anything useful to add.

 

Steve

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Cody welcome to RMWeb, I am currently building my own track and will post pics when I make some progress. I am basing my freelance narrow gauge in West Cornwall's mining landscape. Keep on posting updates as you progress and good luck.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the same as Steve. I've now visited this post 3 times (once each time I've seen a reply was added and the view count is not for unique views afaik). I could only think of 2 people who I have seen producing 2mm narrow gauge and one of them is afaik not on rmweb so that limits it to just Mark, whom you already identified. With you and Richard (above) that is 4.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting this into perspective, it is probably very challenging indeed, unless you have lots of skill, experience and the machine tools to make many parts you will need.

 

When you are into this kind of modelling there are no easy answers. Because there are so few people doing this, each person usually has to find out for themselves how to do what they want.

 

I doubt if anyone has been offended by you mixing up gauges and scales - everyone does that to some degree in the 2mm/N scale arena. The lack of replies is probably that there are very few people doing this, as has been suggested above.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add one comment - Cody mentions "Welsh slate lines". With the exception of the new WHR (which is using massive locos from elsewhere in the world), Welsh narrow gauge locos are tiny. (that says "tiny" to make a point!).

 

To model these in 2mm (or thereabouts), you're looking at getting a motor in a loco where the boiler is 5mm or less in diameter, the cab is puny. Slate wagons are about 6feet overall length, with approximately 1ft diameter curly spoked wheels. Those very small sizes is why nearly all those modelling Narrow Gauge in these scales end up with either Irish 3ft prototypes (getting on towards the size of a small standard gauge loco) or prototypes outside the UK and Ireland. I don't recall ever seeing a layout modelling Welsh prototypes in 2mm scale (or thereabouts), just occaisional one-off locomotives.

 

Example locos on this page part way down are two Welsh prototypes in brass by John Greenwood, the coin alongside them is 18mm in diameter.

http://www.btinternet.com/~two.mm/photos/narrowgauge/narrowgauge.htm

 

 

To be honest, if really wanting to model Welsh slate lines, pick a bigger scale. 009 is one option - the kits by Backwoods Miniatures are generally good, but still very small. Or even consider bigger scales.

 

 

- Nigel

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add one comment - Cody mentions "Welsh slate lines". With the exception of the new WHR (which is using massive locos from elsewhere in the world), Welsh narrow gauge locos are tiny. (that says "tiny" to make a point!).

 

To model these in 2mm (or thereabouts), you're looking at getting a motor in a loco where the boiler is 5mm or less in diameter, the cab is puny. Slate wagons are about 6feet overall length, with approximately 1ft diameter curly spoked wheels. Those very small sizes is why nearly all those modelling Narrow Gauge in these scales end up with either Irish 3ft prototypes (getting on towards the size of a small standard gauge loco) or prototypes outside the UK and Ireland. I don't recall ever seeing a layout modelling Welsh prototypes in 2mm scale (or thereabouts), just occaisional one-off locomotives.

 

Example locos on this page part way down are two Welsh prototypes in brass by John Greenwood, the coin alongside them is 18mm in diameter.

http://www.btinterne...narrowgauge.htm

 

 

To be honest, if really wanting to model Welsh slate lines, pick a bigger scale. 009 is one option - the kits by Backwoods Miniatures are generally good, but still very small. Or even consider bigger scales.

 

 

- Nigel

 

I'd take interest in your suggestion about picking a larger scale accept for the fact that i already model standard gauge 2mm/N-Gauge.

 

I'm not really going for full prototype accuracy, but rather just the overall feel of a Welsh Slate NG railway. This way, i have small locos pulling small wagons through tall scenery and the viewing public keeps asking "is this Z gauge?", only to learn that its N scale, but narrow gauge. I enjoy giving the public a look into the railways of the isles, specifically the GWR (still don't have a loco... never been able to land one on ebay for within my budget...), even though my N-Trak module has yet to get any buildings, and only a "display" of a small rake of 5 wagons, one toad, and a 1970s GWR suburban pair of one coach and one part-brake end that i miraculously found for $2 for the pair at a local train show. The one and only time i ever have and ever will see UK N-Gauge at a US train show.

 

As for my narrow gauge exploits, i plan to start small: a small two point, portable layout with a cassette fiddle-yard. Of course that requires me paying the extortion charges to get two handlaid #4 turnouts, the fiddle yard using some brass strip off an old picture frame for the cassettes, somewhat like Copenhagen Fields. Of course this is all well and useless unless the loco can be completed... its missing two VERY important gears for the worm-gear to be able to move both the front axle as well as the rear axle... Getting a hold of the aforementioned gears is near impossible without paying $50+ dollars...

 

I'm probably forgetting something i wanted to say but hopefully the next few posts will cause me to remember.

 

-Cody F.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cody,

 

I think Julia is trying to show you just how small what you're proposing is. The loco is 'Prince', one of the Festiniog Railway locos (a 2ft gauge slate railway in North Wales) and the model is 2mm scale, built from Julia's own etches.

 

Are you aware of Mark Fielder's Nn3 website? There is a lot of useful info there.

 

http://www.zen98812.zen.co.uk/

 

Andy

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cody,

 

I think Julia is trying to show you just how small what you're proposing is. The loco is 'Prince', one of the Festiniog Railway locos (a 2ft gauge slate railway in North Wales) and the model is 2mm scale, built from Julia's own etches.

 

Are you aware of Mark Fielder's Nn3 website? There is a lot of useful info there.

 

http://www.zen98812.zen.co.uk/

 

Andy

 

I'm well aware of Mark Fielder's website. It is the driving force behind my deciding to take the plunge into Nn3.

As for Julia's etched loco body, it is nice. I'm well aware of the small size, but then again i'm not trying to fully replicate anything. Just the overall look. the basis for my current loco project is Dolgoch, mostly because of the overall simple shapes that comprise the body, as well as the look of the cab and its windows.

The finished product, if ever finished... will be a tiny bit larger than its influence, and when compared to Julia's etched loco body, it will be a bit lacking in some finer detail due to the fact that i won't be able to afford an etching service and even if i could, i'd still have to pay for someone to create the negatives to etch from...

 

As it stands, there are plenty of obstacles in my way so as to the fruit of any labor, its more of an apple with no tree to come from...

 

-Cody F.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

post-2065-0-84054800-1345561178.jpg

 

Missy :P

 

Julia, that's absolutely stunning! I'm utterly gobsmacked, I just can't get my head around how small that is... and how much I want one! The lining that I've just bodged on my Langley one is probably the same width as the cabsides on yours... just don't show my other half or she'll demand that I sell off the 4mm stuff and recreate the entire FR in a shoebox (though that is appealing, come to think of it...)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cody,

 

Nick Tilston at N Brass Loco produces some etched bits and pieces (link here) which might be of interest and which aren't too expensive. I have built one of the locos as a static display piece - the photo is here.

 

Andy

 

Quite a nice loco, the cab would be the only thing of use to me, but would require too much modification to make it economical for me to buy one of the kits.. The "WHR electric Loco" which does resemble the LNER Y6 trams, which is the basis for a possible second loco, perhaps that kit might be feasible to use a basis for some kitbashing into something more resembling wood, as well as the addition of side-plates and cowcatchers since for some reason they are very attractive in my eyes.

 

-Cody F.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.