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john flann

The Hintock Branch-1930's Dorset Joint GWR/SR Workings in OO

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Total agreement with that John and I will remove the post tonight.

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John in the pic above the Signal Man is the Focal point, (as with any good painting) and as you say almost everything points to him in one way or another. A really great composition and I always love small Tender Engines running Tender first. Also in that pic I have noticed FOR THE FIRST TIME, the slope of the land down from the Loading Bay at the back and the effect it has on the wall. Just brilliant little touches that help to add so much realism and brings it all to life. 

 

Just need to get that Loco Crew on a Thunderbirds puppet type wire so they move and acknowledge the Signalman, hahhah.

 

All the best, and I am really enjoying my read through you on line book, its so informative, thanks.

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John

 

Just spent an enjoyable time reading your e-book, a thoroughly enjoyable way to pass the time. The scenario you have created is thoroughly believable and reminds me I must drive up the coast to Hintock and Port Bredy again soon.

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AndyM:, I spent some time as you suggested looking at the LEDS. available here. All most impressive and I can imagine what a difference they would make to photography.

 

You did warn me about price and there they are beyond my pocket. I could not justify the expense. So I shall not be going that road.

 

I have endeavoured to make things easier for myself by hanging the incandescent lamps in semi-fixed locations (although it annoys me to see them hanging as clutter) which saves me the pesky job of doing it for each photographic shoot, I then use the florescent to fill in the remainder and distance and then the halogen to pick up the detail.  In that last shot I concentrated it on the signalman and the locos tender.

 

And it all seemed to work quite well.

 

The light weight tripods with the 300W florescent bulbs and umbrella hrow off a good light, and no heat so it's much more comfortable. With one more It will be easier to fill in further distance as well.

 

Overall I'm quite pleased with how it's developing-and I now appreciate why professional photographer's have a cohort of assistants. Me, I do it all on my tod.

 

My regards, and again thanks for your interest and help,

Edited by john flann
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Martyn, that was a delightful note and I'm glad you enjoyed the read.

 

And when you get into Hintock country I'm sure it will live up to your expectations. It's a pleasure to attempt to re-create that atmosphere of a beautiful part of West Dorset. And if I can succeed in your eyes, as a man on the spot, then I'm doing it right.

 

Regards,

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AndyP, it's always a pleasure to get a post from you for your appreciative enthusiasm shines through and you have a very keen eye. That composition come together quite naturally of an attractive scene and an interesting situation. I like it very much too.

 

I'm glad too you are enjoying the book, it took a while to get it together, select the pictures and finalize the order. I think there's something for everyone and Chris and I did it all on-line. I don't know of any other online model railway ebooks and I'm very happy with the result. From comments made it seems too that readers, like yourself, enjoy the read.

 

I could not respond earlier as I was looking tor the next two images. and here they are:-

 

post-3088-0-12185600-1433126673_thumb.jpg

 

In your post you remarked upon the walls and the different levels, this is the view from the other side and showing Carr's Mill. Again it all makes a nice composition. The story is that the Mill was there before  the railway and the line was diverted around it, which, of course, explains the reason why there is that curve in the line. It was cheaper to do that than pay compensation.There is also quite a bit of unobtrusive detail in the picture.

 

The Mill itself is built on a separate sub-baseboard-rather like a diorama-as is the adjacent Signal Box.  Both are secured by bolts. Thus they can be readily removed if access is required for maintenance aof the track and to get at the layout behind. Such an arrangement is very useful.

 

post-3088-0-11020100-1433126712_thumb.jpg

Edited by john flann
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AndyP, it's always a pleasure to get a post from you for your appreciative enthusiasm shines through and you have a very keen eye. That composition come together quite naturally of an attractive scene and an interesting situation. I like it very much too.

 

I'm glad too you are enjoying the book, it took a while to get it together, select the pictures and finalize the order. I think there's something for everyone and Chris and I did it all on-line. I don't know of any other online model railway ebooks and I'm very happy with the result. From comments made it seems too that readers, like yourself, enjoy the read.

 

I could not respond earlier as I was looking tor the next two images. and here they are:-

 

attachicon.gifDSCN3838-2.jpg

 

In your post you remarked upon the walls and the different levels, this is the view from the other side and showing Carr's Mill. Again it all makes a nice composition. The story is that the Mill was there before  the railway and the line was diverted around it, which, of course, explains the reason why there is that curve in the line. It was cheaper to do that than pay compensation.There is also quite a bit of unobtrusive detail in the picture.

 

The Mill itself is built on a separate sub-baseboard-rather like a diorama-as is the adjacent Signal Box.  Both are secured by bolts. Thus they can be readily removed if access is required for maintenance aof the track and to get at the layout behind. Such an arrangement is very useful.

 

attachicon.gifDSCN3629-1.jpg

John, I've seen Sub Basses on many layouts, I have even tried it myself many years ago, but they always seem to warp in one direction or another and so in time never sit as man intended. With the unit being bolted into place it makes so much sense, and has now given me ideas for some structures that will be in the foreground on the BLT Project, as that baseboard is already on a frame and sits rather higher than I would have liked so reaching over obstacles would be a pain as time progresses.

 

More great ideas, so again many thanks, both for the idea and continued inspiration.

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John, thoroughly enjoying the latest batch of images. Excellent , as always. I can't help thinking that some images taken at track level would give a fantastic view of the layout. Is this possible?

 

Rob

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Andy,

 

Concerning the sub-base-board as you recognize it can can be a handy dodge. Mine is of substantial ply, well braced and quite heavy and I did that to avoid any chance of twisting. It doesn't and hasn't.

 

Black Rat, yes it could, but the subject was OT.

 

Rob: I have done some, as attached, but I'm not keen on it, nor am I keen on photography itself. But you might like this.

 

post-3088-0-98850600-1433163686_thumb.jpg

Edited by john flann
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....and this,

 

post-3088-0-37620100-1433164157_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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they look good to me John. As said before the layout always seems to present itself well in your photos.

Andy R

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post-3088-0-07526900-1433609326_thumb.jpg

 

With all the recent emphasis on the S&DR.....

 

post-3088-0-65498700-1433609460_thumb.jpg

 

....I would not like you to think the GWR (and Sheepcroft Yard) were forgotten.

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Morning (here at least!) John,

I've been looking in from time to time and find your workmanship a true inspiration. I have been designing a layout based loosely on the old G&SWR MPD at Hurlford in Ayrshire, Scotland. My father was a driver there throughout the fifties and we lived for some time in the railway accommodation adjoining the shed.

I have been drawing modules of the layout, and modelling the odd wagon from kits to keep my interest up, but currently the cancer from which I am suffering has rendered me unable to get started, and it is now looking like an early next year project if the drugs continue to work as they have been.

One major problem has just been solved by your post above on sub-bases. I have a restricted space for a layout at the end of my garage, and have been struggling with the design in terms of reaching over too wide a board but it occurs to me, thanks to your simple and clever 'mill board' idea, that I could make a full length sub-baseboard to accommodate the Barleith station and branch line which ran past the site. This would be over six foot long but need be only 12 to 18 inches wide, and although a shallow curve, I think that if I used your method of rigid ply construction with sturdy bolts, it would be possible to quickly remove and re-fit for access to the rest of the layout!

Thank you so much for illuminating that prospect for me, so it's back to the drawing board!

I do very much appreciate your layout and also that you like to keep your thread 'tidy' so, if you wish, I'll gladly remove this post after a short time!

Kind regards,

Jock.

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The amazing transition in the second photo from yesterday (#913) from outside reality to a miniature world perfectly formed!

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Jock: I have sent you a PM and thank you for those kind comments and your interest in Hintock. Your proposed layout appears to be another nostalgia trip as is mine, and I'm glad the sub-baseboard idea will help bring it into being. Make a start when you can or at least as you are currently doing in both planning ahead and getting some stock together.

 

The sub-baseboard makes life a lot easier for me as behind the Mill are 4 points which were the mill fixed in place would be very difficult indeed to replace or work on.As I learned the hard way. Mine is a handy size, in fact it would make a nice diorama, and I suggest that you do not want the sub-board t to be heavy or awkward to handle. Again I learned that by experience.

 

So please when you can, keep us posted on progress.

 

Ian: as you say some transition between the two. I must say I'm not too keen on trackside shots. One has to get everything just right. The larger shots are more forgiving. Here are two more the low level from further back and the other full of detail but not "busy" with it. There's something to be said for both.

 

And, thank you gentlemen for your "likes".

post-3088-0-96347100-1433801485_thumb.jpg

Edited by john flann
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Right gentlemen, here is an image. of Hintock in its earlier form. It will be recalled the line leading away to Port Bedy was inclined to the L, the base board widened and a further coal siding added. All great improvements.

 

It demonstrates the difference between open and closed scenes. Whilst  there is something to be said for both the latter is, I think, more informative.

 

Anyway a busy scene, the M7 can now, with signal "off", draw away with its train for Yeovil with the GWR goods having just arrived and standing in the loop..

 

post-3088-0-91406800-1434039564_thumb.jpg

 

And Andy, seeing as I'm in Edit mode I'll say thank you for the tutorial.

Edited by john flann
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While searching through the records at Dorchester Town Hall, archivists have discovered a well preserved picture taken by the well known local historian Cornelius Crumpler. It shows LMS Rlwy 3F 3762 slowly drifting past Hintock box ready to pick up the single line token for its trip back to the junction.

 

Crumpler liked to record every day life in his beloved county of Dorset and every so often a little gem like this turns up. Though not always in such good condition.

 

post-8259-0-07941900-1434778734_thumb.jpg

 

I do hope you like this find John.

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And for those of you who would like to see my original colour rendition here it is.

All the additions to John's original picture are from photographs taken in Dorset to maintain the right feel for John's  excellent modelling.

 

post-8259-0-64922000-1434779117_thumb.jpg

Edited by Highlandman
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Isn't it strange, in the B & W pic I was looking at the Steam, the Loco and Signalman, and didn't notice the background until I saw the second picture. It's really amazing just what you miss when looking at an old type picture.

 

Great work Andy.

Edited by Andrew P

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Andy M: indeed I do. The B&W takes me back to my days as a small boy of poring over my father's Railway Magazines  and the colour one to the pictures that used to adorn railway compartments.

 

I admire the skill of realizing both images (including the authentic Dorset background and with the Isle of Portland my ancestral home on the far horizon) and of the two, as much as I'm keen on old illustrations and old things (being one myself) I do like how the colour adds so much to the effect and consequent enjoyment of the image.. It has the right "feel" about the subject matter and is quite a masterpiece in its own right. Thank you.

 

Andy P: quite correct, the two are quite distinct and your point is well worth making. Thank you too for your enthusiasm for and your interest in Hintock; as I do those who similarly "like" not only these images but it.

 

PS-later-I've looked again and thought about it and I must say that the B&W image does very much capture the essence of the subject as seen by the lens in earlier days. Honours even, I think.

Edited by john flann
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post-3088-0-07293500-1434902426_thumb.jpg

 

Winter storms played havoc with the sea wall protecting the railway near Port Bredy.

 

post-3088-0-17799300-1434902458_thumb.jpg

 

So James Fraquhaur (RR) & Co Ltd, Civil Engineers of Yeovil were contracted to restore it.

 

post-3088-0-04360700-1434902509_thumb.jpg

 

And these shots show their crane being worked to the site.

 

post-3088-0-98177200-1434902536_thumb.jpg

 

Something not often seen on the Hintock Branch in particular nor on model railways generally. The crane is American HO from Athearn to which I added detail, new rigging, re-painted and decals. The crane's tender is scratch built.

 

The crane and tender I built about 20 years ago for my American short line the JFRR.

Edited by john flann
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Hi John, looking at the pics above, the backscene suddenly hit me, and was wondering why you chose to paint the Sky on the lumpy side and not the smooth side? I use White Faced Hardboard for mine, then even if not painted its a plain white sunny day.

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Andy, good question;.something I've wondered myself when I see it like that. But the reasoning behind it is (was) that normally it breaks up the light. Only in certain shots do the lumps appear-and if I were clever enough when it did I could photoshop them out.

 

However, it's beginning to bug me, and has done so for some time,  so I shall replace it with 1/16" birch ply as the hardboard, called masonite here, is no longer carried by my local supplier. It worked well enough on HTQ.

 

As a yard surface the hardboard bump side out looks very well and gives the appearance of setts. It also an easy way to readily bring up the yard surface to the top of the sleepers. You can see both effects in other images, see especially post #910.

Edited by john flann
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Hi John

 

It's been a while since I've posted on your thread. Summer months give me precious little time to keep up with my own modelling let alone keeping up to date with all the threads I follow here and elsewhere. I do try to keep up to date with certain threads and yours is one where I always look in regularly even if I don't post.

 

Andy's question is something I've pondered over for quite some time even back to our YMR days but never got around to asking about.  I'm pleased to hear that getting rid of the bumps is probably on your 'to do' list and I'm sure that you don't mind me saying that I'm not fond of the fluffy clouds either. I think they draw the eye away from the magnificant scene you have created.

 

I'm sure a more simple graduated sky could make a significant improvement to the setting and I look forward to seeing how you approach it in due course.

 

I very much like the last batch of photos by the way.

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