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Gwiwer

Penhayle Bay

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Added a few images of a "Warship" double-header during today's running ...

 

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... and a scratch rake of stock in the BR sector era, but which sector is running the train?

 

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Cornwall wouldn't be Cornwall without the clay trains .....

 

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And also without the sandy beaches, rocky headlands and the trains which take you to them .....

 

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And also without the sandy beaches, rocky headlands and the trains which take you to them .....

 

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Great use of a narrow space there Rick. The train in the landscape, with a great foreground, all in less than 18", probably? This layout just gets better!

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Thanks Ian. About 16" width there so yes, a very restricted space.

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Summer has passed into a wintery autumn here. It's a lot cooler and the evenings are dark. There is less time to enjoy the railway and work in daylight. But that doesn't stop trains running nor does it stop me getting on with small details. I am installing walkway and farm crossings using a mix of fine ballasts and check-railed with some Code 75 obtained for the purpose. I am also using dilute acrylic to add oil stains to the track at suitable locations.

 

Oil-staining applied to the track through Penhayle Bay; slightly more on the down track where a dmu would stop and some in front of the loco on the up though there is more out of shot as the starting signal here is a couple of coach-lengths beyond the platform end

 

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And at Treheligan where almost everything will stop in front of the signals

 

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Finally one of the farm crossings now constructed is seen in poor light and with the silver bullet rake having just passed by.

 

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Looks very nice Rick.

 

I too have been playing with oil staining though I have noticed with Steamloco's you end up with 2 parallel lines between the rails. In OO it is a challange to get the 2 lines not to mix I have found.

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Hi mate - lovely new photos. Love the thousand with the clays - looks like the loops at Lostwithiel (where I am today - early turn in gloriuos sunshine - no 1000's though). I'm about to start on the harbour scene on my layout and wanted to know what you used for sand. I love the dunes and steep cliffs you've done. But being a Hayle man, I would wouldn't I?

 

Cheers mate

 

 

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Hi Craig.

 

Thanks for your comments. The sand is, oddly enough, sand B) It's a very fine, almost powdery, beach sand which is also sifted through an old tea-strainer to catch any larger grains and bits of shell. It is then mixed with diluted PVA (about 1:2 rather than 1:1 used for ballasting) and thoroughly mixed until it forms a very stiff paste. It is then applied a small patch at a time and lightly pressed into position on the plasterwork. I then used the strainer to shake a light coating of dry sand on to the flat beach so that it doesn't look like a glued mass.

 

The features in the sand such as the "sand-slide" and one or two other shapes typically found in the towans are very simply moulded with fingers while the sand mix is still moist. Any lumps and blobs can be swept up and tossed where you want them to look like fallen sections of the cliff just as you would find anywhere around the Bluff.

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The need to test the line in sun today also produced a crop of photos. Nothing special - just a few images of trains at work .....

 

1. The up mails crosses the down sleeper near the stone circle

 

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2. Tractor power! 37207 comes under Church Lane bridge with some sun glow behind. The other track has been referred to the PW gang :huh:

 

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3. Down main passenger and down branch dmu head off side by side from Treheligan as the up local approaches formed of a class 101 triple

 

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4. A grubby gronk with ballast hoppers in tow rumbles towards the tunnel which will take it into the fiddle yard and a 153 unit in black promotional livery emerges at just the right moment! The gorse is in full flower in the cutting.

 

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5. General view up the road at Treheligan station. Typical of Cornwall this is a medium-sized junction station in the middle of not a lot! The local bus company have at least managed to maintain the connection with the train which they also operate though the cows seem untroubled by any of the activity.

 

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Hi Rick,

The latest pics look great, love the shot of the 47 on vans.cool.gif I think I asked you once before, but what is the make of the overbridge by the station?

 

Cheers Peter,

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Hi Peter - if you are referring to the road bridge (seen in the last set with the "Merlin" HST beneath it) then that is an almost out-of-the-box Skaledale item. The only things I have done to it are to stick Metcalfe "Tarmacadam" sheet for the road surface, added a bit of Woodland Scenics for the vegetation and dropped a few sprinkles of the "Fine turf" onto lightly-PVA'd surfaces to represent a bit of moss growth on the vertical faces. You can just make out a small patch of dark green on the short upwards-facing part of the string course just below the arch coping stones. There's more growing along the top of the string course above the arch as well - it's easier to see it on the far side of the arch.

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Hi Peter - if you are referring to the road bridge (seen in the last set with the "Merlin" HST beneath it) then that is an almost out-of-the-box Skaledale item. The only things I have done to it are to stick Metcalfe "Tarmacadam" sheet for the road surface, added a bit of Woodland Scenics for the vegetation and dropped a few sprinkles of the "Fine turf" onto lightly-PVA'd surfaces to represent a bit of moss growth on the vertical faces. You can just make out a small patch of dark green on the short upwards-facing part of the string course just below the arch coping stones. There's more growing along the top of the string course above the arch as well - it's easier to see it on the far side of the arch.

 

 

Hi Rick,

yes thats the one, thanks. I have been looking for something to use for the entrance to my fiddleyard and that might do the job, though I haven't worked it all out yet.

 

Cheers Peter,

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I must say that you've captured the area rather well...very nice.

Frame.

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The picture with the beach and cliffs is stunning ! Feels so real !

 

Lovely layout wink.gif

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Beautiful modelling.

These pictures spur me on to start another layout.

The sea looks great. How did you get that realistic effect of waves/surf and disturbed sand ?

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Again many thanks for your generous feedback.

 

How did you get that realistic effect of waves/surf and disturbed sand ?

 

The sea itself - and the river flowing into it - are at this stage simply painted straight onto the baseboard. I used a mix of proprietary emulsion test pots from the local hardware warehouse which gave me a selection of blues, greens and browns. The paints were applied individually and roughly brushed together while wet to achieve the blend you see in the pictures. Holding the brush vertically and twirling it in the wet paint created some of the swirly effects.

 

The "surf" is done using white paint I used Humbrol white matt straight from the tin and on a fairly large stipple brush. Drawing the brush in a straight line along the sand gives a straight line effect so to avoid that I used something between feathering and stippling as a technique to get a line uneven in width and density. The rocks around the base of the cliff and the river mouth are chippings I found at a bonsai plant shop and are glued using a fast-grab clear craft glue. The blue of the sea was intentionally taken just onto the line of glue and the very lowest edge of the rocks and when dry the white Humbrol simply stippled onto each rock in turn to give the irregular look.

 

The sand is a very fine beach sand found locally, mixed to a very stiff paste with 50:50 PVA and water before application and sculpting on the layout. Once I was satisfied with the effect I then used a fine sieve (an old kitchen strainer) to sprinkle dry sand on top of the damp tacky mix. This leaves the surface looking like dry sand and with a very light brush with a soft 1" paintbrush (and I mean very light) it is again possible to create an unevenness within it.

 

Remember there are no straight lines on a beach. Not a ruler in sight - this was all done "in the rough" as it were with no intent to create a precise scene. Rather it has given the overall impression of a typical Cornish surf beach as found at places such as Hayle, Sennen, Newquay and others.

 

I'll attach some more images of the coastline which might help to illustrate the techniques I have described.

 

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Stunning pictures ! And the detail, love it ! wink.gif

 

Cheers,

 

Graham.

 

 

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Hi Rick,

 

Nice to drop in again to see progress on Penhayle. As a former long-time resident of Cornwall, it's lovely to see the atmosphere you have created.

 

Re. that shot of the sailboard on the beach - hope you don't think I'm being too picky, but I think if you let go of a sailboard, the sail collapses. I'm no sailboard expert, but it doesn't look right to me. A tiny detail on a lovely atmospheric layout though.

 

Cheers,

Dave

Waverley West

 

 

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Not picky at all Dave and both accurate and fair comment.

 

When the couple (background, to the left of the sail) have finished what ever it is they're up to I'm sure one of them will have it back out on the water. B)

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Hi,

 

Complements on a really lovely layout. I'm not an 'expert' but I have trawled various forums looking for inspiration and ideas, and your layout would make anyones favourite list.

It must be a real joy to see the trains flow in and out of the beautifully created landscapes and cameos.

 

Thanks very much for sharing it. This is the real beauty of forums - it enables someone in North Devon to share in the enjoyment of your layout too!

 

I'm very jealous of the space and rolling stock collection you have. Its going to take me a few years to build a collection anything like that up - but then I suppose it was the same for you!

 

Cheers,

James

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The new Bachmann "Warship"s have arrived down under. Lovely locos with some improvements over the previous iterations of the type. Sure they can be faulted but I got the pair for under £75 (cheaper than one Bachmann loco in many cases) so I'm certainly not complaining! They also look perfectly fine alongside or coupled in pairs with the older versions in the fleet which date back to Mainline days.

 

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Treheligan station, which is built from the Hornby R418 "Dunster Station" kit, has had lighting installed.

 

4 grain of wheat bulbs are fitted to a balsa batten inside the station building, 4 are taken though the wall to the canopy and one to the front porch.

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The lighting is wired to a battery pack fitted beneath the baseboard.

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After dark the lighting is turned on for the first time. Here is the normally unseen entrance porch which faces away from the layout viewer

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And the effect seen from the platform side

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Finally with a train passing through - and what better to reflect the lights than the Dapol "Silver Bullet", with the wagons famed for their mirror finish which has been captured so well?

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Hi Rick,

That looks great, very illuminating.laugh.gif

 

Cheers Peter,

 

 

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