Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I can't do any modelling today, but I can doodle in Photoshop. Wainfleet All-Saints Church sits opposite the goods yard. It's a pretty large building to put on the layout, but fairly simple in that it's just a series of boxes built in a cream brick on a stone base. The bell tower is wooden with a lead roof. The windows will be made in the same way that I produced the crossing gates, i.e. cutting out each layer separately and laminating them together. I've done a quick test and it appears to work!

 

So, attached are the beginnings of the front and left-hand side of the church; there's still some work to put into them. This will be a project for later on in the summer when I can't get downstairs for any period of time. Apart from starting to put the landscaping together, my next proper building is the signal box. I've been getting some great advice on that score, so I'm starting the plans for that this or next week in time to head off to SuperTrain at Calgary for the materials.

 

post-14192-0-32197100-1364942215_thumb.png post-14192-0-51879100-1364942222_thumb.png

 

This is a photo from Google StreetView of the church

 

post-14192-0-61374300-1364942951_thumb.jpg

Edited by JCL
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do manufacturers make it so difficult to get into locos to install decoders? Seriously, I had a Hornby A4 and Bachmann 4MT on the bench this evening. And NEM couplings, a nice idea, but that really narrow section is so fragile, even when you take it slowly with a scalpel blade to ease the thing out!

 

I tried to deal with the Bachmann class 55 as well which had an awful sounding sound chip installed by the supplier, but it all got too much. It's got to be a job for another day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you need any photos of the Church, Signal Box or Station Building let me know. I only live around a mile from the station so it would be no bother to get some pics if needed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Stephen

 

Thanks a lot! If you get a chance, then any photos of the church, especially the crosses at the top and ornamentation at the front. If possible a photo of the non-road side on the right as you look from the front. No rush because I'm not going to start it for a few weeks.

 

If you have a Tardis, a photo of the road side of the goods shed any time before the 1980s would be great too!

 

Thanks again for the offer, its very kind.

 

cheers

 

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've finally finished the goods shed - well I've got it to a point where the only other thing I'm going to do is add some boxes and barge-boards on the eaves. The goods shed at Wainfleet is very elusive when it comes to photos. Any photos that there are tend to be obscured by other buildings, lorries, rolling stock or the edge of the photo, and the far side, the side, the road side, hasn't turned up on any photos at all! I have a little bit of information - there were two sets of doors, and the doors were on the inside and rolled on tracks. On the assumption that the vertical girders are the same on both sides of the building, I've just slotted them in.

 

The building it matte card covered in aluminium corrugations that have been applied using double-sided sticky tape, and painted over with artists acrylics. The weathering was done with a wash of burnt sienna that was painted on and wiped back off again.

 

Oh, and the windows are layers of card cut out with the Silhouette Cameo cutter that I have. It has really helped there as I'm not that great with a knife. Well, I say that, I can rustle up some mean breakfasts :)

 

I've learnt a lot while building this, erm, building. If I was to do this again I would pay a *lot* more attention to getting the bottom edge level - good parts of it appear to be floating! I would also be more methodical about the order of putting things together so that a previous work doesn't make later work more difficult.

 

Overall I'm pretty chuffed with how it turned out.

 

post-14192-0-67979400-1367031322.jpg post-14192-0-99411100-1367031323.jpg post-14192-0-16097100-1367031325.jpg post-14192-0-81113600-1367031326.jpg

 

Next up, signal box - ta dah!

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although parts of the building look like they're floating, it will look spot on once planted on the layout.

 

Duncan

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Duncan. The other thing I'm going to do is put a bit of bracing under the awning to stop the bowing effect. Then it's just a case of siting it. I'm in the middle of building a signal box at the moment (link in the signature), which was initially daunting to say the least, but I'm really enjoying the build now - and I've learnt a huge amount in the process! It's almost done now and I can't wait to see it nestled up to the platform.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi cromptonnut, thanks for the link, I chatted with Dave last year about Wainfleet photos, unfortunately being a small country station not many photos are out there and we swapped what we had. That said, for anyone researching railways in Lincolnshire this really is the best resource that I've looked at out there!

 

cheers

 

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jason.

 

My first visit since November....you've been very busy! Excellent progress - the corrugated iron Goods shed is particularly effective.

 

I must remember to call in here more often. Good stuff!

 

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jason.

 

My first visit since November....you've been very busy! Excellent progress - the corrugated iron Goods shed is particularly effective.

 

I must remember to call in here more often. Good stuff!

 

Jeff

 

Thank you! More to come :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last time I ballasted anything was a long time ago, and I remember not enjoying it at all. Not this time though! I was looking up ballasting on Youtube (not around the last time I ballasted anything) and found a video of a bloke with a home-made ballast vacuumer. This in turn was inspired by an article in a 1978 edition of Railroad Modeler over here. So I put the video into a post a while back in this thread and waited until I needed to start laying stone before I put one together. Well that time is now.

 

Ingredients

  • a jar (mine is about 6" tall)
  • a 6' length of 1/4" tubing
  • painter's tape (optional)
  • plasticard/styrene
  • a spare hose end (if available. This tool doesn't damage the hose if you can't get a spare)
  • duct tape (of course)
  • glue

Method

  1. Drill two holes in the jar lid that are the same diameter as the outside diameter of the hose
  2. Cut about 2' off the end of the hose
  3. Insert about 2"-3" of the long end into the jar
  4. Wrap a thick layer of duct tape around the end of the vacuum cleaner attachment
  5. Make a hole in it and insert the tube into it. Glue this in. I used a hot glue gun.
  6. Insert the end of the short length of tube into the other hole.
  7. To form the flattened funnel that you use to pick up the ballast, cut two pieces of plasticard to the width of your track sleepers. I've a double track mainline, so mine is the width of the gap between the rails between the lines. This is so that you can rest the funnel on the rails and get an even suction both across it's width and down the length of the track.
  8. Use plasticard (or foam board) to build up the sides and sandwich them between the two ends. Although the funnel in the photos is rectangular, the sides are at an angle so that when the whole lot is sandwiched they a form a small gap at the top that is the hose can be put into to form a pretty air-tight connection. I haven't glued the hose into the funnel because there are times when I want to get at something in a tight corner.
  9. For strength, I wrapped tape around the funnel.

A few notes:

 

To regulate the airflow, I use the slider on the vacuum cleaner hose end, but you could drill a couple more holes in the lid in a row if there is room and put tape over them; exposing one or more holes to reduce the suction.

If you have a couple of bottles the same, you can use them to store each of the different type of ballast and/or ground cover.

 

Here's the original video that I watched, complete with annoying music, so feel free to turn down the volume. I think I've put it up on RMWeb before, so sorry if you've seen it already.

 

 

WARNING

Be aware that the vacuum cleaner is going to work harder than usual, so if it overheats it should close down. Just make sure you don't have it switched on for extended periods of time!

 

And that's it! It took less than an hour to put everything together, and it's going to save me a lot of heartache while ballasting! My only problem now is that I've run out of ballast...

 

 

post-14192-0-73260600-1367875742.jpg

 

post-14192-0-99780300-1367875740.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I'm at it, it's been an aeon since I put up some photos, and I've got a few things done between guests this Winter. The goods shed is glued down. It's amazing how a paving brick on top of the building will "square it up". The signal box isn't finished yet, but it's almost there. The station building is still to come as well. That said, the ballasting is coming on. I'm using straight Woodland Scenics light grey for the main lines, and a blend for the yard. My uncle was telling me that the ground was a mixture of beige and grey "rubble". The new hose is helping this, and I'm quickly catching on to using it properly. :)

 

Anyway, here goes.

 

post-14192-0-97159600-1367883723.jpg post-14192-0-39626100-1367883725.jpg post-14192-0-78365800-1367883726.jpg post-14192-0-84612500-1367883727.jpg

Edited by JCL
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more with a bit of Photoshoppery. Church courtesy of Google Streetmaps

 

It's September, and one of the last holidaymaker specials of the summer is returning to Sheffield after a bracing day out. In the yard a 4MT is about to leave with the 3 o'clock goods towards Boston.

 

post-14192-0-50202100-1367889042.jpg

Edited by JCL
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only just found this thread - excellent Goods Shed there - loving the roof!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all

 

Well, with a lot of help and advice (RMWeb really is wonderful), the signal box is finished! Well, except for the levers, but they are a few months down the line. Here are a couple of photos of the box in place. It will butt up against the paper wrapped insulation foam platforms and control the signals and points between Thorpe Culvert and Havenhouse. I was very daunted by how complicated and possibly flimsy a signal box would be, but it turned out better than I hoped for. Hope you enjoy the photos.

 

post-14192-0-80138900-1368579623.jpg post-14192-0-76541800-1368579624.jpg

 

Next on the agenda will be something easy (I hope). It'll be a continuation of the ballasting and coal staithes. Oh, and finishing the bit of platform just behind the signal box to add a couple of steps. You can just see the pink of the foam there at the moment. Although I know of no photos, the staithes in Wainfleet were built horizontally, and there were three of them, so I'm going to go with Redgate's great idea of using coffee stirrers. They look absolutely brilliant, and to this end I've been secreting stirrers about my person for the last few days as I've been wandering in and out of my local coffee shop. I've no idea, I know the owners really well!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The box is looking great, sir. I hope you enjoyed making yours as much as I did mine.  Thanks for that link to Redgate's staithes idea, I'll be making a little coal merchant's next I think...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers mister.

 

Well I think I was rushing ahead with my coal facilities. Quite rightly, there's a bit of a debate about what was there, so I'm going back to my informants on the ground to try to get a bit more information. Of course the problem is that they will be remembering something that wasn't very important that was always around, that was removed in the mid 1960s. If I can't get the info then rule 1 will apply until something better comes along :)

So, I wanted to do something simple before the waiting room on the Boston platform. How about an octagonal store shed with a, well hipped roof? Just on the other side of the haven at Wainfleet is the pinfold. Back in the day it was just a low octagonal wall with a gate in it used to store errant animals. At some point this job was no longer required so the walls were build up and a teepee style roof was added in slate.

I've put together an octagonal building before (which I'd completely forgotten about). Cranbrook, an hour from Fernie, has a Canadian Pacific octagonal water tower - water towers over here had wooden sheaths to help guard against freezing - that I put together from photos last year. The great thing about both of these is that they are pretty plain! Anyway, the main thing will be to keep it sturdy, so I'm planning to use card for the sides and a thick sheet of foam board for the base.

Mouth warbling, I'll go off and find some photos...

 

Here they are

 

Pinfold at Wainfleet

 

post-14192-0-76191000-1368902205.jpg

 

The water tower at Cranbrook

 

post-14192-0-80045500-1368902374.jpg

Edited by JCL
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone tell me how high a standard wheelie bin is? It'll give me an idea about scale as I didn't have a tape measure with me the last time I was in Wainfleet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, they seem to be about a metre high. I might ask my mum, who still lives in the area if she can measure hers - that'll give the neighbours something to talk about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Er... wheelie bins were not used widely until the late 1990s/early 2000s in this part of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welly, I think the wheelie bins are  as a reference point to help scale things in current photos, rather to 'time travel' wheelie bins back 30 years on his layout :)

 

Clearly back then it'd be more like these - http://www.dartcastings.co.uk/dart/L25.php appropriate for his layout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^

Sorry I misunderstood. I went out and measured mine, it is 1 metre high to the opening ( ignore the lid ) 75 cm from the rear of the pivot to the front and about 55cm wide.

 

I hope it helps as a rough reference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem welly :) yep, it's just to get an approximate height as I don't know the size of the bricks. Once I have the height and width of a wall it shouldn't be too difficult putting together the plans. I'm quite looking forward to this one.

Edited by JCL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.