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This time last year I had not the slightest desire or inclination to visit Australia.  It's amazing what a travel brochure can do ...

 

Chris

In the grand tradition of the BBC ....... for balance -

 

Great spot, but mind the bities

 

By ALAN LANDER

 

AUSTRALIA is known as the most lethal place on Earth when it comes to deadly animals and marine life.

And within our borders, the Sunshine Coast ranks in the top five dangerous places in the nation.

So dangerous that one of the nations top medical toxinologists, who is based in Melbourne, comes to Nambour Hospital as often as possible V to get experience.

Deputy director of the Australian Venom Research Unit Dr Bill Nimo organised a weekend Toxinology conference at Twin Waters Resort to help rural GPs and medical experts get more information about treatment for snake and spider bites.

The Sunshine Coast is the capital for a lot of bites and stings, he said.

But with more overseas doctors now here who dont know our creatures, and the shortening of medical tenures from six to five years, this area of knowledge is just not being taught anymore.

Dr Nimo said fables such as the white-tailed spiders so-called necrotising effect, where flesh supposedly falls off  grew because GPs just didn't know the truth.

It doesn't happen, he said. You see awful pictures, but when you look, it was something else, a drug reaction (perhaps).

On the other hand, dangerous funnel web spiders are plentiful around the Coast and there are plenty of snakes tigers, brown, rough-scaled  here.

As for marine life, the Steve Irwin tragedy underlines the need to being very careful with bites, stings and barbs.

It was not venom that killed Steve it was trauma, Dr Nimo said.

He was stabbed in the heart.

Even if someone gets just a cut, a doctor may send them home, saying its a superficial cut.

But if its in the torso, it can kill. If anyone gets one, they should go for help.

Dr Nimos advice for any bite or sting is to give first-aid and contact triple-0, or get to a hospital.

 

 
Edited by Lecorbusier
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In the grand tradition of the BBC ....... for balance -

 

Great spot, but mind the bities

 

By ALAN LANDER

 

AUSTRALIA is known as the most lethal place on Earth when it comes to deadly animals and marine life.

And within our borders, the Sunshine Coast ranks in the top five dangerous places in the nation.

So dangerous that one of the nations top medical toxinologists, who is based in Melbourne, comes to Nambour Hospital as often as possible V to get experience.

Deputy director of the Australian Venom Research Unit Dr Bill Nimo organised a weekend Toxinology conference at Twin Waters Resort to help rural GPs and medical experts get more information about treatment for snake and spider bites.

The Sunshine Coast is the capital for a lot of bites and stings, he said.

But with more overseas doctors now here who dont know our creatures, and the shortening of medical tenures from six to five years, this area of knowledge is just not being taught anymore.

Dr Nimo said fables such as the white-tailed spiders so-called necrotising effect, where flesh supposedly falls off  grew because GPs just didn't know the truth.

It doesn't happen, he said. You see awful pictures, but when you look, it was something else, a drug reaction (perhaps).

On the other hand, dangerous funnel web spiders are plentiful around the Coast and there are plenty of snakes tigers, brown, rough-scaled  here.

As for marine life, the Steve Irwin tragedy underlines the need to being very careful with bites, stings and barbs.

It was not venom that killed Steve it was trauma, Dr Nimo said.

He was stabbed in the heart.

Even if someone gets just a cut, a doctor may send them home, saying its a superficial cut.

But if its in the torso, it can kill. If anyone gets one, they should go for help.

Dr Nimos advice for any bite or sting is to give first-aid and contact triple-0, or get to a hospital.

 

 

 

Not trying to put anyone off, but have a look at this topic:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/125159-for-those-that-fear-coming-to-australia/

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This time last year we were looking at this...

 

post-7650-0-97524200-1548676613_thumb.jpg

 

The Blue Lake at Mount Gambier on the Great Ocean Road - for us from Murray Bridge to Melbourne

 

It was 41C and lovely!  

We then had an ice cream in the air conditioned shop before continuing on our way.

 

Baz

 

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Am I the only person who reads this thread who has never been to Australia, not likely to go, never had a reason to go or has ever had a desire to go? I hope our Australian friends are not offended because I am not a person who has this wanderlust for anywhere in the world.

 

never been but may be one day during retirement

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I am sure there are lots of lovely places in Australia, like there is all over the world. I am sure there are loads of nice people in Australia, like there is all over the world. I am sure the food is good in Australia, like it is all over the world. I just never had a desire to visit Australia, like the rest of the world. I have been abroad ( including the Isle of White) and enjoyed myself whilst I was in the various places I have been to.  I am sure I would should someone or a reason take to Australia. I am happy with Britain, there is still loads of places I haven't seen or been to and many more I would like to visit again before I say good bye to this planet.

Edited by Clive Mortimore
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In the grand tradition of the BBC ....... for balance -

 

Great spot, but mind the bities

 

By ALAN LANDER

 

AUSTRALIA is known as the most lethal place on Earth when it comes to deadly animals and marine life.

And within our borders, the Sunshine Coast ranks in the top five dangerous places in the nation.

So dangerous that one of the nations top medical toxinologists, who is based in Melbourne, comes to Nambour Hospital as often as possible V to get experience.

Deputy director of the Australian Venom Research Unit Dr Bill Nimo organised a weekend Toxinology conference at Twin Waters Resort to help rural GPs and medical experts get more information about treatment for snake and spider bites.

The Sunshine Coast is the capital for a lot of bites and stings, he said.

But with more overseas doctors now here who dont know our creatures, and the shortening of medical tenures from six to five years, this area of knowledge is just not being taught anymore.

Dr Nimo said fables such as the white-tailed spiders so-called necrotising effect, where flesh supposedly falls off  grew because GPs just didn't know the truth.

It doesn't happen, he said. You see awful pictures, but when you look, it was something else, a drug reaction (perhaps).

On the other hand, dangerous funnel web spiders are plentiful around the Coast and there are plenty of snakes tigers, brown, rough-scaled  here.

As for marine life, the Steve Irwin tragedy underlines the need to being very careful with bites, stings and barbs.

It was not venom that killed Steve it was trauma, Dr Nimo said.

He was stabbed in the heart.

Even if someone gets just a cut, a doctor may send them home, saying its a superficial cut.

But if its in the torso, it can kill. If anyone gets one, they should go for help.

Dr Nimos advice for any bite or sting is to give first-aid and contact triple-0, or get to a hospital.

 

 

 

As Phil Tufnell put it on TMS, everything in Australia is trying to kill you, spiders, snakes ... and fast bowlers.

I've not been there, but I'd like to see it - if you could cool it down a bit, and move it a little closer.

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Thanks again, Martin,

 

However, without appearing ungrateful, perhaps I should elaborate on my understanding of current technologies......

 

For one, I don't have blue tooth, blue ray or blue anything - though the TVR I owned was blue.

 

I have a DVD player (somewhere); however, at the moment I don't have a grandchild to show me how to operate it.

 

My mobile phone (if I could remember where I put it) is 13 years old! The last time I made a call on it was last July! 

 

I don't think our telly is widescreen - it's 11 years old.

 

My own computer is even older, and the one I'm using this to post on is nine years old - I'm told that's old in computer lives. 

 

My younger son speaks to some gadget and it then plays music. I have a radio (10 years old) which does the same thing if I switch it on, though I find it difficult to change channels. For some reason it comes on at eight in the morning and switches itself off an hour later. It's a mystery. I long for the one I had as a boy, where one turned a knob and got things like Hilversom (or Hilversome, or Hilversum - I've forgotten how it was spelled). Speaking of radios, the one in my current car (four years old) is totally incomprehensible. Not only that, the onboard computer is also incomprehensible, as is its manual. 

 

My eyesight is probably not good enough to fully-distinguish the number of lines on a telly screen. Didn't it used to be 405 and 625? Regarding tellies, why do adverts play louder? 

 

Anything else? I live in blissful ignorance of modernity. Though I use a digital darkroom, the programme I use is from 2007, which I understand. My cameras are, obviously digital, but I made the mistake once of looking through some of the sub-menus. I had to take one of them back to a camera shop to get it 'back to normal'! The guy who 'fixed' it was certainly young (or old?) enough to be my grandson. Why don't the manufacturers of such complex gadgetry today offer a free grandchild with each purchase? 

 

Do I want to learn? No.

 

But, thanks for trying to explain. It's analogous to giving a lecture on advanced nuclear physics to 3C! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.

 

 

Ahhhh what about DCC?

 

 

Hehe

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  • RMweb Gold

 

In the grand tradition of the BBC ....... for balance -

 

On the other hand, dangerous funnel web spiders are plentiful around the Coast and there are plenty of snakes tigers, brown, rough-scaled  here.

 

 

 

 

I had a very close encounter with a big brown snake - slithered past a couple of feet from me while I was enjoying a picnic and a glass

of wine in the Snowy Mountains. On the same day we also saw a tiger snake, but I was on the back of a horse at the time so felt

slightly less exposed.

 

I had significant wanderlust in my 20s and 30s but although we still travel occasionally, the wanderlust is all but gone. I'm very happy

where I live. My wife and I have just returned from looking for otters 10 minutes walk from our house, and although we didn't spot

an otter today, we did see an egret and I "copped" a kingfisher on my jog last week.

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Am I the only person who reads this thread who has never been to Australia, not likely to go, never had a reason to go or has ever had a desire to go?

Clive, no you are not alone as I have never been nor am I likely to being a poor pensioner shielding his loot from HMRC clutches (legally). However whilst I was employed one of my employers sent me to Hong Kong many times, Bangladesh, Thailand, South Africa, Mocambique and Eire. I also managed to visit California and Canada enroute from Hong Kong effectively circumnavigating the globe.

 

Tim T

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I’ve been to Canvey Island.

When I worked for the National Blood Service there use to be a nice Pie and Mash Shop we use to have lunch in when we held a donor session on Canvey Island. Can't get Pie and Mash here in Lincolnshire :cry: :cry:

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When I worked for the National Blood Service there use to be a nice Pie and Mash Shop we use to have lunch in when we held a donor session on Canvey Island. Can't get Pie and Mash here in Lincolnshire :cry: :cry:

 

My Mum used to work at the Brentwood Blood Bank - wrote the book on freezing blood. My brother in law also worked then until they closed it.

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Hi Tony

 

Love all these photos of the Sidney Harbour Bridge, fabulous country and great people.

 

When I first saw that Sidney Harbour Bridge it was a mind blowing sight, I must of photographed it from every conceivable angle possible

 

This is yet another photo of the bridge but taken from an angle you don't see very often.

 

Regards

 

David 

post-6557-0-60888000-1548695762_thumb.jpg

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Have you got any of the Hungry Horse chain of pubs in your neck of the woods? They do a very nice steak and ale pie, you can swap the normally offered chips for mash, comes with lashings of gravy as well:)

I was on about real East London pie and mash, with liquor. The pies are minced beef and onion in a flakey type pastry, not like normal meat pie pastry. mash is mash. The liquor is a parsley sauce made from the juice off the jelly eels. Best served with vinegar with chilies in it. It pre-dates fish and chips as a "fast food".

post-16423-0-89084000-1548698438_thumb.jpg 

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Just to change the subject a bit - Have just received  my subs copy of BRM which has the Little Bytham DVD on the front cover attached with gorilla snot. Very nice film showing a variety of trains on the M&GN and ECML sections. 

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I’ve been to Canvey Island.

 

And got off again?

 

I've been to lots of places but not Australia though I was lucky to travel to quite a few places when I was younger. Last few years have mainly been to Italy, a superb country and we've been to take our daughter's to art galleries in Venice and Rome and the opera in Verona in preparation for their courses at University. But then I live in Dorset, people travel here for holidays and to drive annoyingly slowly forgetting that some of us have to get to work.

 

Back to trains, tranquility in rural Norfolk.

 

post-12773-0-24556000-1548700854_thumb.jpg

 

post-12773-0-28598800-1548700868_thumb.jpg

 

Water to be varnished at a later date. Garage is too cold and I don't want to get a poor finish.

 

Martyn

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Australia - I've been on quite a few 747's going there from Heathrow, Frankfurt & Munich. Never been there though as our destination on these flights was Bangkok - one day we would like to go there - Sydney, Great Barrier Reef, perhaps the Indian Pacific across to Perth or The Ghan up to Alice Springs / Darwin (not the one near Bolton !!). Lots of nothing to see I believe !!

 

Talking of bucket lists, Train journeys I would love to do - Trans Siberia, The new line China to Tibet (trains are pressurised like aircraft due to the altitude),  Guayaquil & Quito, Lima to Huancayo (both across the Andes) and anything long distance in N America / Canada, No1 being Denver - Salt Lake City  on Amtrak's California Zephyr. Perhaps this last one I will actually do one day.

 

Here's a useful Amtrak train tracker map in real time -- https://asm.transitdocs.com/map

 

We have been Bankok to Chiang Mai & Bangkok to Hat Yai both by sleeper - superb journeys those were, many years ago. Everyone in our family (except me) these days want's to fly everywhere - why ?

 

Dreams !!! - Off to Manchester tomorrow, A DMU via Bolton or a 319 Electric via Golborne - I might look out for a last ride on a Pacer -- A "Great train journey of the world" - NOT !!!!!!

 

Brit15

Edited by APOLLO
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Simply had to post! Australia - been twice - the first time in 2007 eeing ex sugar cane engine in Port Douglas as well as a Leeds built Fowler tank engine on a plinth.

Computers - love em!

And after having been incredibly generously given a 60th birthday present of a London Road Models J6 by Mr. Wright ... 11 years later it is well underway!! It might even be running this year!!!

Hoping Mo is well recovered!

I'm normally just a daily reader of this brilliant forum. Long may it continue!

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