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9 hours ago, micklner said:

How do you hold the lamps whilst drilling?. I have managed to destroy 50% of the handles on the Lanarkshire LNER version I have whilst holding them. Very nice castings, and as said very good value.

 

I use a vice like the ones in the pics.

Easy to clamp and hold to ensure drill is true to the lamp and unlike trying to hold the lamp in tweezers or even between fingers when the drill catches it doesn't twist it round and remove the handle..as I presume was what happened!

 

IMG_4381.jpg.eeeb0bdf108e4767202a6bfad8d3b6a1.jpg

 

 

IMG_4386.jpg.d25f8b007de9cedd9c8e2bbc14288180.jpg

 

IMG_4384.jpg.f22620491418043a77ff09d1ee2c9019.jpg

 

IMG_4389.jpg.7270a1d246a243fb4ff54a4d69364210.jpg

 

IMG_4391.jpg.95ea1a7e1a9dca1fb4f31128eef4ecb5.jpg

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2 hours ago, vitalspark said:

 

I use a vice like the ones in the pics.

Easy to clamp and hold to ensure drill is true to the lamp and unlike trying to hold the lamp in tweezers or even between fingers when the drill catches it doesn't twist it round and remove the handle..as I presume was what happened!

 

IMG_4381.jpg.eeeb0bdf108e4767202a6bfad8d3b6a1.jpg

 

 

IMG_4386.jpg.d25f8b007de9cedd9c8e2bbc14288180.jpg

 

IMG_4384.jpg.f22620491418043a77ff09d1ee2c9019.jpg

 

IMG_4389.jpg.7270a1d246a243fb4ff54a4d69364210.jpg

 

IMG_4391.jpg.95ea1a7e1a9dca1fb4f31128eef4ecb5.jpg

Very good idea , I have similar clamps , many thanks !!

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10 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

It looks wonderful, Mick,

 

But, shouldn't the pony wheels have the same number of spokes as the bogie wheels?

 

I could well be wrong, but I thought they had ten.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Tony

 

As already said by t-b-g above  , I have now looked at the relevant Yeadon volume, all the A5's in the photos had 10 spokes on the bogie and  11 spokes on the rear truck. Gibson do not do a 11 spoke wheel , no idea about any other makers ? In view of this the builder didn't have much choice other than use the 12 variety I presume . Either way he has made a lovely looking Loco.

 

edit , it has now been confirmed the model has the correct rear truck 11 spoke wheels fitted believed made by  Ultrascale .

Edited by micklner
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1 hour ago, micklner said:

Tony

 

As already said by t-b-g above  , I have now looked at the relevant Yeadon volume, all the A5's in the photos had 10 spokes on the bogie and  11 spokes on the rear truck. Gibson do not do a 11 spoke wheel , no idea about any other makers ? In view of this the builder didn't have much choice other than use the 12 variety I presume . Either way he has made a lovely looking Loco.

 

Looking closely at Tim Peacock’s excellent A5/1 I think the trailing radial truck wheel is Ultrascale

 

D759D074-097E-43CE-A134-2C6BE4065EE5.jpeg.21093d89a136fc6c83dd39ce629388d7.jpeg

 

https://www.ultrascale.uk/eshop/products/view/CAT021/116

 

It has a Stanier pattern bevelled rim but it is not that noticeable. I’d spot an incorrect number of spokes first. An acceptable compromise? I’d say so. Not all P4 lads/lasses are “hairshirt” you know :o)

 

Morgan

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15 minutes ago, 45609 said:

 

Looking closely at Tim Peacock’s excellent A5/1 I think the trailing radial truck wheel is Ultrascale

 

D759D074-097E-43CE-A134-2C6BE4065EE5.jpeg.21093d89a136fc6c83dd39ce629388d7.jpeg

 

https://www.ultrascale.uk/eshop/products/view/CAT021/116

 

It has a Stanier pattern bevelled rim but it is not that noticeable. I’d spot an incorrect number of spokes first. An acceptable compromise? I’d say so. Not all P4 lads/lasses are “hairshirt” you know :o)

 

Morgan

Thanks Morgan,

 

I'm glad you've mentioned that not all P4 modellers are 'hairshirts'. A few came today, and none of them is.

 

We had a great time, running LB - very fast at times! - and it worked impeccably (even if I didn't). Jeff Day (of Dartley fame) actually brought two OO locos which he'd built for a friend many years ago. Sadly, his friend died and Jeff now has them. 

 

408969678_SEFinecastA260534.jpg.7e6c8bc9ff0daf752c99b05b8c48a167.jpg

 

First to run was this old Wills/SE Finecast A2. It ran very well (if a little light-footed) but it illustrates the problems of building a kit as supplied. Jeff's a GWR modeller (in P4), so he just built this loco as supplied. The kit was designed using the Roche drawing, which means the cab is wrong, the dome is wrong and the tender is wrong (among several other errors). No matter, it won't be altered now, and it stands as a memory to a friend. A product of its time I think, and good to see. 

 

1503761830_ModifiedHornbyBritannia.jpg.fd8d4e76e0157530f0b4e2a146e67273.jpg

 

The other one was this modified (ex-tender-drive) Hornby 'Britannia'. Another lovely runner, this one romped away with a quite-heavy train. 

 

It's a real privilege and pleasure to have such great chaps, the like of which came today to see and run LB. Thank you, gentlemen; for your hospitality, wit, tolerance and donations to CRUK. And thanks, Jeff, for bringing these models. It's always good to have visiting locos running on LB.

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For drilling out lamps, legs on figures ( to insert a pin) lampposts etc etc etc I use dental drills, suitably scrounged, in a pin chuck.

 

Far more controllable than using any sort of powered device, and having broken many a drill bit, leg, lamp and lamppost find this the most easiest way bar none.

 

If a larger hole is required than I just treat the dental drill hole as a pilot and open it up accordingly.

 

I've found it fine on plastic, resin, cured Milliput, Brass, whitemetal and numerous other materials.

Edited by BlackRat
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4 hours ago, BlackRat said:

For drilling out lamps, legs on figures ( to insert a pin) lampposts etc etc etc I use dental drills, suitably scrounged, in a pin chuck.

 

Far more controllable than using any sort of powered device, and having broken many a drill bit, leg, lamp and lamppost find this the most easiest way bar none.

 

If a larger hole is required than I just treat the dental drill hole as a pilot and open it up accordingly.

 

I've found it fine on plastic, resin, cured Milliput, Brass, whitemetal and numerous other materials.

 

I find that a Minidrill has so little power that switching it on then squeezing the chuck between first finger and thumb you can control it from zero to any speed and allows you to concentrate on lining up the lamp squarely.

There is no danger of it running away or damaging the casting if you regulate the speed as suggested.

 

Dave.

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12 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

 

1503761830_ModifiedHornbyBritannia.jpg.fd8d4e76e0157530f0b4e2a146e67273.jpg

 

The other one was this modified (ex-tender-drive) Hornby 'Britannia'. Another lovely runner, this one romped away with a quite-heavy train. 

 

 

Presumably it didn't have a limp like this real one:

 

DSC_9229cr.jpg.395f93233f5106b9df1fd2f1b0da56e6.jpg

 

G

 

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4 hours ago, davefrk said:

Thanks to Mr Spark LMS have run out of certain lamps and will have to do a casting session next week which was going to be a busy week anyway.

 

Dave.

Sorry about that. It was my question that Mr Spark answered...

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14 hours ago, vitalspark said:

 

I find that a Minidrill has so little power that switching it on then squeezing the chuck between first finger and thumb you can control it from zero to any speed and allows you to concentrate on lining up the lamp squarely.

There is no danger of it running away or damaging the casting if you regulate the speed as suggested.

 

Dave.

 

I use my Minidrill in exactly the same way. I do this when drilling a precisely positioned 'dimple' before then drilling a pilot hole. 

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8 hours ago, grahame said:

 

Presumably it didn't have a limp like this real one:

 

DSC_9229cr.jpg.395f93233f5106b9df1fd2f1b0da56e6.jpg

 

G

 

 

I'm sure that Hornby's spares department can help out with that Grahame! :P

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Good evening Tony,

 

I would like to present some RTR locomotives that are presently being modified.

 

First up is A3 2573 Harvester in c. 1928-34 condition complete with a Westinghouse pump. I need to do some additional research, but I believe that the locomotive should really be paired with a corridor tender. I have most of the bits for one of these but it will need to be assembled and painted before it is fit for service with this loco. The locomotive started life as a Dapol A3 2744, Grand Parade, but has been altered to right hand drive and had some corrections to the original livery. The Westinghouse pump came from a Dapol Terrier but I scratch built the mounting bracket. Vacuum pipes and couplings will be added in due course.

 

584644986_2573Harvester.jpg.dc1e1d3edd926b1aa206e640992fd0da.jpg

 

Next is 2562 Isinglass, again using a Dapol Grand Parade model as the starting point. This one has been backdated into A1 condition by sanding off the super heater header covers from the smokebox and converting to right hand drive. Since I took the (bad!) photograph, I've noticed that I've not transplanted the reversing rods yet - I'll do this tomorrow. You can just see where I've filled and patch painted the boiler following the removal of the pipe from this side. Both locomotives will end up being lightly weathered, so hopefully this will get hidden. Both locomotives should really have large cutouts to the cab sides but I decided it was best to draw the line at that one (at least for the moment!).

 

Isinglass.jpg.ef0667b076e31fc5f4fd05a207705752.jpg

 

However, Hadley Wood will require several A1s and A3s and I've still got a few more to work through. Nearly all of these have been purchased as non-runners or assembled out of various spare parts acquired over a number of years. The total roster for Hadley Wood will ultimately total twelve of these locomotives (five, other than weathering are already available for service), all with subtle differences. The locomotive on the far left hand side is a Flying Scotsman that is being repaired and detailed for a friend.

 

727663520_A1A3Projects.jpg.f247601fba9b087176752c915bb31f8f.jpg

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18 hours ago, Jesse Sim said:

As Tony mentioned, demanded, asked, pleaded, I'll never know? That I post these pictures from a running session a few weeks ago on here, so here goes. 

 

 

Here we have a Raven A2 heading south with a parcels train. I purchased this loco through Tony on behalf of a deceased estate, shes beautifully built and painted, some may remember it being posted on this thread back in November 2016. In the foreground is the half completed engineers train, with one of three kit bashed LNER Dolphin wagons. 

 

91960108_A2Parcels.JPG.4a996489c959974305129b79a3a38623.JPG

 

Looking North and we see an A4, '4491' Commonwealth of Australia, romping past south towards Grantham. I really like this shot, really shows the small incline on the road and embankment. A better view of the partially completed engineers train. 

 

180223651_A4Express.JPG.b889f34eaaef4fea1796579da12bdb42.JPG

 

Another favourite, this photo is actually my laptop screen saver. We have a C1 heading south with an ECML stopper, whilst a J11 heads towards Nottingham with a goods train, having come of the mainline. 

 

1721911559_C1J11.JPG.bc02d60b8f7503e5592b3aa7b8b7af5b.JPG

 

Another C1 heading north with the Yorkshire Pullman, coming round the curve into Brighton Junction. The private Ironstone line is being worked with a small sentinel, however there is a peckett that will be used for that line. 

 

1404189365_C1QUEENOFSCOTS.JPG.9b7d605bd4fe35393f32c8219532b55b.JPG

 

Lastly an O4 working hard with a heavy coal train on the Up line. I do need to change that post 40's number!!!!!!

 

1004847921_RODcoal.JPG.f19c86de11e5e4294f556bb855f8979c.JPG

Thanks Jesse,

 

Great stuff!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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2 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Last weekend I helped one of my fellow club members operate his layout at the Great Central Railway model railway show. Tony had very kindly offered me the chance to visit his home and see Little Bytham first hand. This was great because living in Scotland meant a visit to see the layout would be a very long journey.  Since I was already at Quorn for the show it was therefore the perfect opportunity to stay over until the Monday after the show and make the short hop to Tony and Mo's to spend a delightful morning there. 

 

Tony very kindly allowed me to video the layout and was happy to run my choice of trains. He also gave me permission to upload the video to YouTube and to post a link here as well. I should say that I am by no means a professional videographer so this is not the most broadcast quality of videos, far from it in fact. I do hope that you enjoy it anyway and that it inspires you.

 

There are several shots where the sounds of the 12 inches to the foot real thing passing at speed on the main line behind the train shed encroaches on the video. 

 

Please look out in particular for the penultimate train shown in the video. I think Tony was trying to better, in model form, Joe Duddington's speed record with Mallard just past Little Bytham. The train, with 13 cars on, traverses the layout twice and the second circuit looks as though there is a devil holding the regulator wide open and breathing into the firebox!

 

Several of you have recently commented very favourably on the Princess Coronation loco which Tony has been building and the photograph of it which he posted here. The final train in the video is pulled by that loco. It is still unpainted but is a superb mover. 

 

To you and Mo Tony, thank you for such a great time which I thoroughly enjoyed.

 

Archie

 

 

Thank you, Archie,

 

For doing such a splendid job of filming LB. Thank you also for your most-generous gift of a hamper to Mo and me (I must admit to never having eaten haggis!) and your most-generous contribution to CRUK. 

 

One thing I did notice about the video was how loud those locos I've built with Portescaps are. It's a most-irritating whine, and, other than their ease of fitting, I cannot see any advantage to them. I'm told folk claim they'll pull anything, but big Mashimas and decent gearboxes do the trick for me, especially in the larger locos. The A3 going at over 250 mph (yes, that's it's scale speed!!!!!) is fitted with just such a combination. If nothing else, though that high speed was really little more than my showing off, it shows how good Norman Solomon's trackwork is. I had to slow down for the curves on the end, otherwise centrifugal force would have had the lot on its side! 

 

Many thanks again.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Edited by Tony Wright
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Today, I've had the pleasure of visiting Hattons' in Widnes. The purpose of the visit was to participate in the making of a DVD with Dave Mylett, the Exclusive Commissions Manager, where we discussed the firm's forthcoming O Gauge A3s. 

 

I have to say, these look very good indeed (I'm not being paid for saying this, by the way!), and at around £700.00 they should be very well-received. These are the pre-production samples, and the comments and criticisms I made will be acted upon with regard to the production locos. At the moment, only left-hand drive models are being made, and only as A3s. A GNR tender option is also being investigated. 

 

896113085_2745CAPTAINCUTTLE.jpg.3c085270cb70e09cba56f1bf77fc7fb5.jpg

 

In wartime black condition. At the moment, all the pre-production samples have a Smith-Stone speedo fitted, but this is easily-removed. 

 

105045270_4472FLYINGSCOTSMAN.jpg.335b726b98bc4ffe438fdd19108fe9a4.jpg

 

FLYING SCOTSMAN in 1980s' preserved condition, after the tender tank had been rebuilt. 

 

1133678159_60072SUNSTAR.jpg.6bbe4a609da97a7f0733b6c2f6fb6778.jpg

 

A BR blue option will also be available.

 

2141823705_60103FLYINGSCOTSMAN.jpg.4706e82218224550c0ef8db7e2a67341.jpg

 

FLYING SCOTSMAN again, in current preserved condition. Issues have occurred with the pony truck, but these are being resolved in test-running. 

 

Thanks to all at Hattons for a most-entertaining day...............

 

 

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2 hours ago, Atso said:

Good evening Tony,

 

I would like to present some RTR locomotives that are presently being modified.

 

First up is A3 2573 Harvester in c. 1928-34 condition complete with a Westinghouse pump. I need to do some additional research, but I believe that the locomotive should really be paired with a corridor tender. I have most of the bits for one of these but it will need to be assembled and painted before it is fit for service with this loco. The locomotive started life as a Dapol A3 2744, Grand Parade, but has been altered to right hand drive and had some corrections to the original livery. The Westinghouse pump came from a Dapol Terrier but I scratch built the mounting bracket. Vacuum pipes and couplings will be added in due course.

 

584644986_2573Harvester.jpg.dc1e1d3edd926b1aa206e640992fd0da.jpg

 

Next is 2562 Isinglass, again using a Dapol Grand Parade model as the starting point. This one has been backdated into A1 condition by sanding off the super heater header covers from the smokebox and converting to right hand drive. Since I took the (bad!) photograph, I've noticed that I've not transplanted the reversing rods yet - I'll do this tomorrow. You can just see where I've filled and patch painted the boiler following the removal of the pipe from this side. Both locomotives will end up being lightly weathered, so hopefully this will get hidden. Both locomotives should really have large cutouts to the cab sides but I decided it was best to draw the line at that one (at least for the moment!).

 

Isinglass.jpg.ef0667b076e31fc5f4fd05a207705752.jpg

 

However, Hadley Wood will require several A1s and A3s and I've still got a few more to work through. Nearly all of these have been purchased as non-runners or assembled out of various spare parts acquired over a number of years. The total roster for Hadley Wood will ultimately total twelve of these locomotives (five, other than weathering are already available for service), all with subtle differences. The locomotive on the far left hand side is a Flying Scotsman that is being repaired and detailed for a friend.

 

727663520_A1A3Projects.jpg.f247601fba9b087176752c915bb31f8f.jpg

Thanks Steve,

 

Splendid stuff.

 

What 'real' modelling is all about!

 

Perhaps we'll now have examples of many other A1/A3 models; please.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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23 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

I had to slow down for the curves on the end, otherwise centrifugal force would have had the lot on its side! 

 

Whey hey!  My first chance to be a pedant on Wright Writes!:dance_mini:  It's centripetal force that you would have observed.  Only your loco crew and lamps would experience centrifugal force.

 

Enjoy the haggis, chieftain of the pudding race.  Is it slices to be fried for breakfast or a ball to be consumed with all the trimmings?

 

Alan

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13 minutes ago, Buhar said:

Whey hey!  My first chance to be a pedant on Wright Writes!:dance_mini:  It's centripetal force that you would have observed.  Only your loco crew and lamps would experience centrifugal force.

 

Enjoy the haggis, chieftain of the pudding race.  Is it slices to be fried for breakfast or a ball to be consumed with all the trimmings?

 

Alan

Being even more pedantic, centripetal force applies towards the centre of the curve and is what causes the train to deviate from a straight line. Centrifugal force applies away from the centre of the curve and is what causes the train to try to carry on in a straight line, according to Newton's First Law. Centripetal and centrifugal forces are equal and opposite to each other, according to Newton's Third Law.

 

Regarding haggis, I'd start by eating it as a ball for dinner and then frying up the leftovers for the next day's breakfast...

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6 minutes ago, Buhar said:

Oh well, I was close (as Eric Morecambe used to say).  But being close doesn't get you marks for pedantry.

Alan

 

It was all the right theory ..just not necessarily in the right order........

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2 hours ago, Buhar said:

Oh well, I was close (as Eric Morecambe used to say).  But being close doesn't get you marks for pedantry.

Alan

But you got the haggis bit right Alan!

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8 hours ago, Buhar said:

Whey hey!  My first chance to be a pedant on Wright Writes!:dance_mini:  It's centripetal force that you would have observed.  Only your loco crew and lamps would experience centrifugal force.

 

Enjoy the haggis, chieftain of the pudding race.  Is it slices to be fried for breakfast or a ball to be consumed with all the trimmings?

 

Alan

Thanks Alan,

 

My physics teacher, Mr Bolton, was wrong then? 

 

As for haggis, since I don't eat meat, I won't be sampling it, but thanks, all the same, Archie.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

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