Jump to content

Please use M,M&M only for topics that do not fit within other forum areas. All topics posted here await admin team approval to ensure they don't belong elsewhere.

Tony Wright

Wright writes.....

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Buhar said:

Whey hey!  My first chance to be a pedant on Wright Writes!:dance_mini:  It's centripetal force that you would have observed.  Only your loco crew and lamps would experience centrifugal force.

 

Enjoy the haggis, chieftain of the pudding race.  Is it slices to be fried for breakfast or a ball to be consumed with all the trimmings?

 

Alan

Thanks Alan,

 

My physics teacher, Mr Bolton, was wrong then? 

 

As for haggis, since I don't eat meat, I won't be sampling it, but thanks, all the same, Archie.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

 

As for haggis, since I don't eat meat, I won't be sampling it, but thanks, all the same, Archie.

Tony,

my wife doesn’t like “proper” haggis so we eat vegetarian haggis. Even I, a confirmed carnivore, think it’s better than the real thing.

HTH

Tim T

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The video is most impressive, especially the A3 which sounds like a rocket going past. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, rka said:

The video is most impressive, especially the A3 which sounds like a rocket going past. 

Thank you,

 

I think Archie did a grand job. What the video does show is how the work of a very good team has blended together to make a consistent whole. All I need to do now is to complete the point rodding!

 

Regarding the A3, it looks like it's speeded-up on the video, but it isn't.

 

I've been requested to shoot some more footage of LB myself. Corbs has offered to edit it, and, to make his job easier, I'll blank off the ends with white sheeting, hiding the shelves of spare locos. With his expertise, it should look very good.

 

As for even more video footage on LB, I've got the team from Bachmann coming over today to take some moving footage of a 'new product'. Watch this space!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I look forward to seeing the new videos.

  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thank you, Archie,

 

For doing such a splendid job of filming LB. Thank you also for your most-generous gift of a hamper to Mo and me (I must admit to never having eaten haggis!) and your most-generous contribution to CRUK. 

 

One thing I did notice about the video was how loud those locos I've built with Portescaps are. It's a most-irritating whine, and, other than their ease of fitting, I cannot see any advantage to them. I'm told folk claim they'll pull anything, but big Mashimas and decent gearboxes do the trick for me, especially in the larger locos. The A3 going at over 250 mph (yes, that's it's scale speed!!!!!) is fitted with just such a combination. If nothing else, though that high speed was really little more than my showing off, it shows how good Norman Solomon's trackwork is. I had to slow down for the curves on the end, otherwise centrifugal force would have had the lot on its side! 

 

Many thanks again.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

The A3 looks as though it might have been going faster than this (it was a test run by the way): https://youtu.be/eNSf1agolps

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Alan,

 

My physics teacher, Mr Bolton, was wrong then? 

 

As for haggis, since I don't eat meat, I won't be sampling it, but thanks, all the same, Archie.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

 

I doubt Mr Bolton was wrong, just that the term "centrifugal force" is a contentious one in physics because the force in question is considered "fictitious", being due to frames of reference rather than an external influence like a magnetic field. Broadly, centrifugal force is the force you think you feel when you go around a corner - but it's just your body's natural inclination to want to keep going in a straight line. Centripetal force - which is real - is whatever force is applied (seat belts, car, friction of tyres on road) to prevent you going in a straight line.

 

Al

 

 

 

 

Edited by Barry Ten
  • Agree 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Perhaps we'll now have examples of many other A1/A3 models; please.

 

Happy to oblige, Tony, now I'm back home.  Two in preparation for Grantham later this year:

 

Hornby-2557-small.jpg

 

2557 is a simple renumber/rename of a Hornby Flying Fox.  Plates from 247, numbers HMRS.  There are some bits from the Brassmasters detailing pack to go on before it's weathered.

 

Hornby-2580-small.jpg

 

There's been rather more work put into 2580, which began as an NRM 1980s Flying Scotsman.   For almost all the 1930s she carried an ACFI feed water heater and all the associated pipework.  I had started building the pump, but Al Turner is now making this 3D print available, which will save me some work and be much more detailed.  Replacement chimney and dome courtesy or Mr. King and the usual 247/HMRS identity change.  Tender kindly supplied by Tom Foster.

Edited by jwealleans
  • Like 15
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Being even more pedantic, centripetal force applies towards the centre of the curve and is what causes the train to deviate from a straight line. Centrifugal force applies away from the centre of the curve and is what causes the train to try to carry on in a straight line, according to Newton's First Law. Centripetal and centrifugal forces are equal and opposite to each other, according to Newton's Third Law.

 

Regarding haggis, I'd start by eating it as a ball for dinner and then frying up the leftovers for the next day's breakfast...

Now the haggis in it natural surroundings neither feels or experiences centrifugal  or centripetal forces as it runs around the mountains. They normally only go clockwise owing to their left legs being shorter. It is when they try to go anticlockwise and become unbalanced they fall over a tumble down the mountain into the butchers shop. They never had a problem until Newton invented gravity.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 2
  • Funny 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony,

 

I've seen a couple of your photos of these two A3s on LB which are much better than these snaps. How long did you have them on loan for? Starting point was two Hornby A3s supplied in BR green livery. I stripped, detailed, backdated to 1930's condition and then repainted/lined (including the wheels) into Doncaster green.

 

P1000361.jpg.252114c36246a478ebc0555776b28fe5.jpg

 

P1000362.jpg.c3f462c656712039e56c94a7107000d0.jpg

 

P1120495.jpg.7317eebac30ce0b52f46e107477f26be.jpg

 

Cheers...Morgan

 

 

  • Like 9
  • Craftsmanship/clever 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thank you,

 

I think Archie did a grand job. What the video does show is how the work of a very good team has blended together to make a consistent whole. All I need to do now is to complete the point rodding!

 

Regarding the A3, it looks like it's speeded-up on the video, but it isn't.

 

I've been requested to shoot some more footage of LB myself. Corbs has offered to edit it, and, to make his job easier, I'll blank off the ends with white sheeting, hiding the shelves of spare locos. With his expertise, it should look very good.

 

As for even more video footage on LB, I've got the team from Bachmann coming over today to take some moving footage of a 'new product'. Watch this space!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Please, please, let it be the V2...……..

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some really nice models of Gresley A1s and A3s.

 

I cannot normally join in when discussing locomotive models. OK the project was abandoned for various reasons, none to do with the concept of the model. I was going to use Tri-ang Hornby Flying Scotsmen as a basis for a RH&DR based layout in 1/24 th scale. I didn't get too far. rdhr1.jpg.af466c62b05798a4413188ecedfaf30f.jpg

Seen on my former 4mm scale Hanging Hill layout.

 

I still have desires on building something similar, as the RH&DR is one of my favorite railways to visit.

  • Like 10
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Some really nice models of Gresley A1s and A3s.

 

I cannot normally join in when discussing locomotive models. OK the project was abandoned for various reasons, none to do with the concept of the model. I was going to use Tri-ang Hornby Flying Scotsmen as a basis for a RH&DR based layout in 1/24 th scale. I didn't get too far. rdhr1.jpg.af466c62b05798a4413188ecedfaf30f.jpg

Seen on my former 4mm scale Hanging Hill layout.

 

I still have desires on building something similar, as the RH&DR is one of my favorite railways to visit.

Agree re the RHDR, just back from spending all day today riding it. With the regular loco swaps at New Romney all very reminiscent of the many locations on BR in steam days where locos were exchanged mid-trip. Grantham and Salisbury come to mind.

Edited by john new
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, 2750Papyrus said:

 

Please, please, let it be the V2...……..

 

Please, please let it be something that isn't already available from one of the kit manufacturers.  Otherwise it'll be yet another nail in one of the Small Supplier's coffins :(

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

 

I doubt Mr Bolton was wrong, just that the term "centrifugal force" is a contentious one in physics because the force in question is considered "fictitious", being due to frames of reference rather than an external influence like a magnetic field. Broadly, centrifugal force is the force you think you feel when you go around a corner - but it's just your body's natural inclination to want to keep going in a straight line. Centripetal force - which is real - is whatever force is applied (seat belts, car, friction of tyres on road) to prevent you going in a straight line.

 

Al

 

 

 

 

It was in the late-'50s, Al.

 

A long time ago...................

 

He demonstrated it by the use of a modified gramophone turntable, placing a small brass weight on its edge. As the speed of the 'table increased, the weight shot off; at a natural tangent? He said that was centrifugal force (if I remember correctly, though that's debatable).  

 

Anyway, whatever forces were acting on that 250+mph A3, had I not eased the throttle as it approached a 3' 6" radius curve, the whole lot would have been on its side! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, 45609 said:

Tony,

 

I've seen a couple of your photos of these two A3s on LB which are much better than these snaps. How long did you have them on loan for? Starting point was two Hornby A3s supplied in BR green livery. I stripped, detailed, backdated to 1930's condition and then repainted/lined (including the wheels) into Doncaster green.

 

P1000361.jpg.252114c36246a478ebc0555776b28fe5.jpg

 

P1000362.jpg.c3f462c656712039e56c94a7107000d0.jpg

 

P1120495.jpg.7317eebac30ce0b52f46e107477f26be.jpg

 

Cheers...Morgan

 

 

I must have had them a couple of months, Morgan,

 

Maybe longer. They eventually went to a friend of mine. You painted them beautifully.

 

Thanks to all those who've shown us their A1s/A3s today, but they all seem to be altered RTR ones as far as I can see. I had rather hoped to see some built ones, but they are nice. 'Nice' until one looks at the valve gear, particularly the angle of the eccentric rod and the length of the expansion link. It's so wrong, and looks even worse in motion. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How come "Wright writes" is blessed with lots of photos or RTR A3s with the dreadful Hornby valve gear?

 

As I was writing this, "sir" added an identical thought but I will let mine stand!

 

 

Edited by t-b-g
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, 2750Papyrus said:

 

Please, please, let it be the V2...……..

Sorry to disappoint you..........................

 

The new V2 should be ready by later this year, but there is no definite date.

 

What ran on LB today was a 'Western Pullman' set in the 'reversed' livery. I have to say, it ran magnificently-well, accompanied by a whole range of sounds, including driver's door being unlocked and opened, auxiliary gadgets being switched on, engines starting up and revving up, a guard's whistle, brakes being released, engine accelerating and six different horn sounds - all controlled beautifully by a Dynamis set. There was also a large range of different 'light' combinations, including full-internal at various levels, cabs illumination and appropriate front and rear lamp configurations. Along with umpteen acceleration, braking and coasting modes, the list of instructions was rather large! 

 

The team from Bachmann 'filmed' it all as part of a promotion for the product. I have to say, were I a diesel and electric modeller of the period it would be very tempting. The performance, prototype accuracy and finish were as good as anything which has ever run on LB, including all the hand-built/hand-painted items. However, for the six-car set, some £800.00-£900.00 (maybe more!) will be required to acquire it when it's released in a few months' time. Granted, one also gets with it a full Dynamis control system (which can be used for all other DCC locos/functions one might have), and remember there are two power cars. 

 

No doubt a stunning model, but time will tell how it sells. Obviously, given that I assisted with the making of the footage, and I'm on very-friendly terms with the team, my opinion might be seen as biased. However, I'm not being paid for this (we should all help each other where and when we can), and I didn't ask to be. Having seen it, operated it and listened to it, I think it's fantastic, but (again, obviously) it's not for me. 

 

Now a fully sound-equipped Deltic...............................................!!!!!!!! Who knows? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

How come "Wright writes" is blessed with lots of photos or RTR A3s with the dreadful Hornby valve gear?

 

As I was writing this, "sir" added an identical thought but I will let mine stand!

 

 

Thanks Tony,

 

Looking at prototype shots of A3s, the front end of the eccentric rod is only lower than the back end for a tiny bit of the wheels' rotation, and then only by a very small amount. Certainly not the near-45 degrees displayed by Hornby's A1/A3 gear. Hornby's gear has the front end lower for just about all the wheels' revolutions - the opposite of what it should be. 

 

Not only that, the eccentric crank leans the wrong way on one side. 

 

Gresley's gear (at least to me) is the most elegant of any fitted to an outside-gear steam loco, especially in motion. 

 

I find it such a shame with regard to the models. The A1/A3 body-shape is beautifully-captured by Hornby, and they generally work very well. Yet, for all this, folk seem happy to accept such a poor representation of the valve gear. Many layouts I've seen which depict ECML steam practice use nothing else than Hornby's RTR locos to represent their A1s/A3s! Is it any wonder why I prefer to make my own? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Chamby said:

 

https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/news/class-55-deltic-in-4mm-our-first-locomotive

 

If the product matches the hype, your wish may be granted!

 

 

Indeed, Phil,

 

And I must express an 'interest' here.

 

I've given Accurascale many of my own Deltic photos to work from and I've written a personal piece for them describing this great class.

 

As I say, help where and when one can.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 2
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tony,

 

Looking at prototype shots of A3s, the front end of the eccentric rod is only lower than the back end for a tiny bit of the wheels' rotation, and then only by a very small amount. Certainly not the near-45 degrees displayed by Hornby's A1/A3 gear. Hornby's gear has the front end lower for just about all the wheels' revolutions - the opposite of what it should be. 

 

Not only that, the eccentric crank leans the wrong way on one side. 

 

Gresley's gear (at least to me) is the most elegant of any fitted to an outside-gear steam loco, especially in motion. 

 

I find it such a shame with regard to the models. The A1/A3 body-shape is beautifully-captured by Hornby, and they generally work very well. Yet, for all this, folk seem happy to accept such a poor representation of the valve gear. Many layouts I've seen which depict ECML steam practice use nothing else than Hornby's RTR locos to represent their A1s/A3s! Is it any wonder why I prefer to make my own? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

I have never measured such things but my feeling is that the return crank is a little too long and the bottom end of the expansion link is also too long. So the eccentric rod, which should be almost parallel to the coupling rod slopes down at the front, as you point out. It really does mess with the proportions and why people tolerate a backwards facing return crank on one side is beyond me.

 

I also prefer a proper multi layer expansion link and a proper slidebar, with a flat solid top but you don't get those even in many kits.

 

When you see what somebody like Chris Pendlenton does, it shows what can be done with a bit of extra work.

 

Luckily for me, I am exempt all such excitement as my beloved GCR wasn't big on outside valve gear. It wasn't unknown but very rare. 

  • Agree 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

but (again, obviously) it's not for me. 

 

Now a fully sound-equipped Deltic...............................................!!!!!!!! Who knows? 

BUT, Tony...... would it provide the full soundtrack from two minutes before the train passed?

 

On a summer's evening, you are sitting on a grassy bank with just the slightest breeze rustling the ground and a nearby tree.  Some distant binds chirping, possibly starlings?  Then the signal wires tinkle and in straining to hear, you can just make out a distant drone.  Then this is briefly drowned out by a passing car on the bridge crossing the line just a hundred or so yards behind you; the short flatulent "pfft" as the driver changes gear identifying the car un-mistakenly as a Morris Minor.  Then the drone again, louder this time, and a long two-tone blast on the horn as the train approaches the path crossing half a mile away.  The noise grows and grows until less than half a minute later, the howl reaches a crescendo as the Deltic roars past, the note dipping as it passes with the Doppler effect and soon drowned by the pulsing roar of every one of the 24 bogies behind, including a rat-tat-tat-tat of a wheelflat on one axle.  Then just the receding drone for another half-minute, another tinkle as the signal returns to danger, until all you are left with is the starlings and soft rustling of the grass again.

 

When a sound system can give this, I might be interested.  Until then, I recommend searching out some old Peter Handford LPs and playing them in you railway room.

 

Rob

  • Like 7
  • Agree 6
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.