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Tony Wright

Wright writes.....

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1 minute ago, Barry Ten said:

Lovely to see those shots of Kingstorre, Tony.

It was a joy to photograph, Al.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Does this one look like a 'big plastic toy'?

Reminds me of my Tri-ang Big Big Hymek...

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3 hours ago, PMP said:

 

All of the above I suspect.

Plus indifference and ignorance in some cases I suspect.

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26 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

Plus indifference and ignorance in some cases I suspect.

.. and another word beginning with "in" that I couldn't remember earlier - indolence.

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What those signal photos do illustrate is a variety of length and position of the stripes on some model signal arms.

 

I read somewhere that upper quadrant enamel finished arms were very consistent, with a 12" stripe at the end and a width of, I recall, 8" width of white on the front and black on the back of a full size stop arm. Some of those in the photos appear to match those sizes but others do not. Perhaps one of our tame signalling experts can confirm if they should vary or not.

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The British Railways drawing I have, Arm length 41 3/4 in, stripe 7in wide, leading edge 12 1/2in from end of arm.

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8 hours ago, micknich2003 said:

The British Railways drawing I have, Arm length 41 3/4 in, stripe 7in wide, leading edge 12 1/2in from end of arm.

 

 

I've just measured the signal arm I have in my garage from New Basford, although I know which post it came from I don't know it's designation, possibly up advanced starter? 

From the outer end it's 12 3/8th inches to the white stripe which is 7inches wide followed by another 22 1/4 inches of red. As my car is there at the moment I can't turn it round to check the back but presume it's similar. It's marked BR(M) if memory serves.

It's possible it's shorter than standard because the cutting was closing in rapidly at that point leading to Sherwood Rise tunnel.

I also have the calling on arm from the exit from New Basford carriage sidings. 

 

Edit: having re read the quote I see it's pretty much standard size:sungum:

Edited by great central
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I had a real push last year to build working Alan Gibson and MSE signals for my layout.  Some of the examples shown below.  I'd been sitting on most of these unmade kits for 15 years.

 

DSC00483.JPG

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12 minutes ago, Killybegs said:

I'll just add one of mine. Sorry no lamp on the brake van!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/05ax3.jpg.02d49696980b8e6f57c34e8b4400a903.jpg

 

All signals operated with Seep solenoids/

Beautiful signals.

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Have you had many (any) of the Seep solenoids fail? I've had over a dozen failures of them in as many years operating the fiddle yard points. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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30 minutes ago, Edmund Kinder said:

I had a real push last year to build working Alan Gibson and MSE signals for my layout.  Some of the examples shown below.  I'd been sitting on most of these unmade kits for 15 years.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/DSC00483.JPG.339431146593946411eb59b4c0e07c61.JPG

What splendid signals.

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

How have you made them work, please?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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2 minutes ago, 31A said:

Some signals at Finsbury Square:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020029.jpg.4e1d89e7b8ec897eadfebaced49651fa.jpghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020214.jpg.1761f3758711c6a42be70cdcfddd75f9.jpghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020543.jpg.c4cea5447c376908bc38f03e3b9d3777.jpghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020968.jpg.3ce5cda37ad81041090e001a3dd6cff5.jpg

 

They all work, but not by electricity and have now been properly 'planted' as per the last two pictures.  This has been done by roughly cutting pieces of sandpaper to fit round the post & ladder and gluing them above the signal base plate, then painting to (try and) match the surrounding ground.  Almost as niggling as the lack of working signals, is exposed base plates in holes in the ballast!

 

I'm soon going to have to face up to making working discs ....

 

 

Great work, Steve.

 

'Almost as niggling as the lack of working signals, is exposed base plates in holes in the ballast!'

 

And, guilty as charged. However, until the Veissman motors have been proven not to fail (and it's being worked-on), we need to be able to remove the signals with ease.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

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Thank you, Tony.

 

They work by weighted cranks under the baseboard:

 

P1020537.jpg.d4c3d9eebeebf4717c28771c4207a1f7.jpg

 

The weighted arm of the crank is connected to a lever frame by braided fishing line; the "pull" includes a child spring (from an old ball pen will do); the short arm is connected to the signal arm.  If the proportions are correct the arms bounce nicely!  The one above was unfinished when I took the picture; the finished article includes 'on' and 'off' stops either side of the long arms so that any strain is taken by the mechanism rather than the signal itself.

 

It got a bit complicated for the six arms on the signal bridge:

 

P1020183.jpg.dc28c0945b1d7143fc08eaa05cc7913d.jpg

 

The idea behind covering the base with a piece of sandpaper is that it could be peeled off and replaced fairly easily if it were necessary to uproot the signal.  It is glued down with Woodland Scenics "Scenic Cement", which looks like a diluted form of PVA.  I sincerely hope it won't be necessary, however!

 

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24 minutes ago, 31A said:

Thank you, Tony.

 

They work by weighted cranks under the baseboard:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020537.jpg.d4c3d9eebeebf4717c28771c4207a1f7.jpg

 

The weighted arm of the crank is connected to a lever frame by braided fishing line; the "pull" includes a child spring (from an old ball pen will do); the short arm is connected to the signal arm.  If the proportions are correct the arms bounce nicely!  The one above was unfinished when I took the picture; the finished article includes 'on' and 'off' stops either side of the long arms so that any strain is taken by the mechanism rather than the signal itself.

 

It got a bit complicated for the six arms on the signal bridge:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/P1020183.jpg.dc28c0945b1d7143fc08eaa05cc7913d.jpg

 

The idea behind covering the base with a piece of sandpaper is that it could be peeled off and replaced fairly easily if it were necessary to uproot the signal.  It is glued down with Woodland Scenics "Scenic Cement", which looks like a diluted form of PVA.  I sincerely hope it won't be necessary, however!

 

What a delightfully simple system, Steve.

 

Simple, yet in its way rather sophisticated. 

 

I think what I admire more than anything else about your approach to model-making is that you've done everything yourself. I wish I were more 'rounded', but I most enjoy building locos and stock. 

 

Tony Geary used lead pieces to give a 'bounce' to Stoke Summit's signals, but they were worked electrically.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Beautiful signals.

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Have you had many (any) of the Seep solenoids fail? I've had over a dozen failures of them in as many years operating the fiddle yard points. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Not on the signals but a couple on the turnouts. Mind you, as an exhibition layout that was only out on the circuit three or four times a year over a twenty year period, it's not surprising that there weren't too many failures.

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

Hello Tony

 

Some 'wagon observations' to consider...

 

Those packing cases in the wagon in the middle foreground look precarious. And the same goes for the load in what looks like a Lowfit behind a Shocvan in the crane dock to the far right.

 

Brian

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

What a delightfully simple system, Steve.

 

Simple, yet in its way rather sophisticated. 

 

I think what I admire more than anything else about your approach to model-making is that you've done everything yourself. I wish I were more 'rounded', but I most enjoy building locos and stock. 

 

Tony Geary used lead pieces to give a 'bounce' to Stoke Summit's signals, but they were worked electrically.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

 

Thank you Tony!  I like making things (even if most of my locos come from China these days) and like to try and keep things simple, there seems to be a trend towards over-complication and fascination with tecchy gadgets these days; I'd like to think the way my signals work is in keeping with the real thing, even if the mechanism is underground.

 

Whether they bounce or not seems to depend on the relative lengths of the crank arms with the weight arm needing to be quite long relative to the other one; something I didn't appreciate at first but never mind - real signals don't always bounce and some say, shouldn't bounce.

 

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