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Tony Wright

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6 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tim,

 

Of course I remember my trainspotting days in B&W. I started trainspotting (proper) in 1956, and Trains Illustrated (which was avidly read at the time) was always monochrome. Even when it grew up into Modern Railways (still having steam images on its cover from time to time) it was mainly B&W, as was the contemporary Railway World (which was also read from cover to cover at the time). The main photographic contributors' work of the day was always in B&W - Eric Treacy, Colin Walker, etc.

 

Ah, those B&W days........................... 

 

 But of course .... I wasn't talking about the photos taken or those avidly poured over in magazines .... but rather what you observed with intense excitement with the naked eye - and yes ... through the lens of your own Camera ... in magnificent full colour !!! Live steam no less - which sadly for many of us it is only possible to get an inkling of through the prism of black and white, and to some extent the sanitised heritage scene.

 

Mallard in Blue .. the flying scotsman in Green ... not to mention the glorious LMS in Crimson Lake ... 

 

Surely you don't remember those Halcyon days in black and white ? however nostalgic the photos might be.

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I have nothing more to add to the present discussions but I have been looking out for a certain milestone.

 

If my counter is up to date this is post no 40,001.

 

That is worth mentioning in despatches!

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I’ve been plodding on with the Grange chassis ‘as and when’. As mentioned before it‘s the first one I’ve built that has to work. Today was coupling rod day.  I soldered the halves together and with Tony’s advice ringing in my ears, “get in and out quick!” soldered the fixing washers on. It was much easier than I expected and much to my amazement everything revolved first time.  It’s now spent 15 minutes on the rollers in each direction.
 

Obviously the rods need cleaning up and the wheels came from the ‘odds box’ (correct size, wrong number of spokes and with one crankpin held in with super glue only) but now I know everything works I’ll send off for the proper ones. 

 

Much relief and an early Christmas present!

 

11D3AF2F-67C2-4FC8-883B-49FED6BF4B36.jpeg.b346283dd26b0a031154266655cadd91.jpeg

Edited by TrevorP1
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59 minutes ago, Lecorbusier said:

 But of course .... I wasn't talking about the photos taken or those avidly poured over in magazines .... but rather what you observed with intense excitement with the naked eye - and yes ... through the lens of your own Camera ... in magnificent full colour !!! Live steam no less - which sadly for many of us it is only possible to get an inkling of through the prism of black and white, and to some extent the sanitised heritage scene.

 

Mallard in Blue .. the flying scotsman in Green ... not to mention the glorious LMS in Crimson Lake ... 

 

Surely you don't remember those Halcyon days in black and white ? however nostalgic the photos might be.

'Mallard in Blue .. the flying scotsman in Green ... not to mention the glorious LMS in Crimson Lake ... 

 

Surely you don't remember those Halcyon days in black and white ? however nostalgic the photos might be'.

 

Of course not, Tim,

 

I'n not that old! Though I do have childhood memories of locos in BR blue.

 

And, yes, I saw BR steam in glorious polychrome (one can't be an art teacher if one is colour blind), though BR 'standard grime', which was very common, would hardly exploit the spectrum. 

 

It's just that, as mentioned, in my 'formative' years it was (to quote Irwell) 'You'll remember those black and white days', which I do.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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39 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

I have nothing more to add to the present discussions but I have been looking out for a certain milestone.

 

If my counter is up to date this is post no 40,001.

 

That is worth mentioning in despatches!

Thanks Tony,

 

I assume that's a lot?

 

The reason I ask is that some years ago on here there was a 'dispute' (if I recall correctly) between two threads about which layout was the 'most-popular', resulting in the 'loser' taking no further part in posting about what he'd made/was making. I thought it rather petty at the time, and still do. Is it that important? 

 

I think what is important is how this particular thread (which is not 'mine' by the way) is frequented by so many actual modellers. I've learned so much from it, so my thanks to all who've contributed (and contribute still).

 

And, yes, in typical Wright hypocrisy-mode, I did 'celebrate' 1,600 pages!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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46 minutes ago, TrevorP1 said:

I’ve been plodding on with the Grange chassis ‘as and when’. As mentioned before it‘s the first one I’ve built that has to work. Today was coupling rod day.  I soldered the halves together and with Tony’s advice ringing in my ears, “get in and out quick!” soldered the fixing washers on. It was much easier than I expected and much to my amazement everything revolved first time.  It’s now spent 15 minutes on the rollers in each direction.
 

Obviously the rods need cleaning up and the wheels came from the ‘odds box’ (correct size, wrong number of spokes and with one crankpin held in with super glue only) but now I know everything works I’ll send off for the proper ones. 

 

Much relief and an early Christmas present!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/11D3AF2F-67C2-4FC8-883B-49FED6BF4B36.jpeg.b346283dd26b0a031154266655cadd91.jpeg

Great stuff!

 

Merry Christmas!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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9 hours ago, Dunsignalling said:

 

Very nice but, in my view, a bigger improvement would come from a liberal application of "ground-level-grot" (ash, puddles etc.) to the layout.

 

John

Hi John 

 

Thank you for your kind comments, but the layout is far from completed.

 

I still have lots of track wiring to do plus adding point motors, this all has to be completed as you know before any scenic works starts.
 

But I do agree fully with your comments that the addition of ashes, cinders etc will certainly improve the photos.

 

At present I am just experimenting with different photographic angles for now.

 

Regards

 

David

 

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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Given, then, that the only way that a real-life a photographer could capture such an image would be in B&W, here it is again......................

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/927905812_07CopenhagenFieldsBW.jpg.a97ae300a5ac5f0e38236fdf0bd28be2.jpg

 

Which actually I prefer, given that it's much more redolent of the time. 

 

 

 

Now I understand...I think....

http://calvin-and-hobbes-comic-strips.blogspot.com/2011/11/calvin-asks-dad-about-old-black-and.html

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tony,

 

I assume that's a lot?

 

The reason I ask is that some years ago on here there was a 'dispute' (if I recall correctly) between two threads about which layout was the 'most-popular', resulting in the 'loser' taking no further part in posting about what he'd made/was making. I thought it rather petty at the time, and still do. Is it that important? 

 

I think what is important is how this particular thread (which is not 'mine' by the way) is frequented by so many actual modellers. I've learned so much from it, so my thanks to all who've contributed (and contribute still).

 

And, yes, in typical Wright hypocrisy-mode, I did 'celebrate' 1,600 pages!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

I am not sure if it represents popularity of anything but the thread does seem to have taken on a role of being a digital meeting place for a certain sort of people. Huge chunks of the thread have very little to do with Little Bytham directly. The layout forms a sort of core to which we add all sorts of vaguely related content.

 

None of it is important. It is just people nattering about building model railways. life, the universe and everything.

 

In truth I only look at a tiny number of threads on RMWeb now. There is so much on here that to look at it all would leave no time for anything else but to me, 40,000 comments sounds like a lot! This one always gets looked at as it is usually has something worth reading, whether I agree with it or not.

 

Here's to 50,000!

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53 minutes ago, landscapes said:

Hi John 

 

Thank you for your kind comments, but the layout is far from completed.

 

I still have lots of track wiring to do plus adding point motors, this all has to be completed as you know before any scenic works starts.
 

But I do agree fully with your comments that the addition of ashes, cinders etc will certainly improve the photos.

 

At present I am just experimenting with different photographic angles for now.

 

Regards

 

David

 

Hi David,

 

I should have spotted that it was a work-in-progress. Having had another look, the track looks freshly laid.

 

It's well on the way to being a very nice layout and, having got the engineering side taken care of, dressing it up should provide an enjoyable way to spend some of the long winter evenings.

 

Regards

 

John

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

'Mallard in Blue .. the flying scotsman in Green ... not to mention the glorious LMS in Crimson Lake ... 

 

Surely you don't remember those Halcyon days in black and white ? however nostalgic the photos might be'.

 

Of course not, Tim,

 

I'n not that old! Though I do have childhood memories of locos in BR blue.

 

And, yes, I saw BR steam in glorious polychrome (one can't be an art teacher if one is colour blind), though BR 'standard grime', which was very common, would hardly exploit the spectrum. 

 

It's just that, as mentioned, in my 'formative' years it was (to quote Irwell) 'You'll remember those black and white days', which I do.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Tony

You have also claimed to remember lner green.......just . Possibly a b1 but your knowledge of each engine type was not as sharp then. 

Oh to have seen it.

richard 

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1 hour ago, richard i said:

Tony

You have also claimed to remember lner green.......just . Possibly a b1 but your knowledge of each engine type was not as sharp then. 

Oh to have seen it.

richard 

I do, Richard,

 

It would be at Kiveton Park in about 1950/'51, sitting on the 'box steps while my granddad chatted to his neighbour, the signalman. 

 

It must have been a B1 in apple green or even a B17, but I was only four or five, so I don't know. A first railway memory? It's definitely there. 

 

The family went over Woodhead before my dad got a car and before electrification. The loco hauling us was black, so I assume it was another B1, or even a V2. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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B1 in Apple Green?   I saw one not so long ago, at Twyford...  not sure about the authenticity of the white discs/high intensity lamp though!

 

Feb_2015_003.jpg.cdf1628c6bbfd76db1c7c02d24bc7f03.jpg

Feb_2015_005.jpg.0116f7f04401d1181f9653275b9be4ef.jpg

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61306 was a originally a Hull Botanic engine and turned out new in Apple Green .

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7 hours ago, ArthurK said:

I have not ,as yet, mentioned the hard working goods locos hauling their loads of coal from  mines to docks. Yes they were dirty unless you were lucky to see one ex works. Perhaps it's because of dirt and grime that I remember them.  

 

ArthurK

But even when dirty ... they passed through a landscape (however industrial) of colour.

 

All the photos however are black and white.  So we never get a proper feel for the reality of what it must have been like ..... a bit like we have a complete misconception of gothic cathedrals which back in the day were a riot of painted colour not austere stone.

 

It is for this reason I think that I like photo's of model railways to be colour .... it gives some inkling of what must have been and acts as a counterbalance to the countless books of photos.  Why shoot models in black and white unless you are looking for an 'art' shot? .... when you can go to the photos of the real thing for that.

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11 hours ago, Chamby said:

B1 in Apple Green?   I saw one not so long ago, at Twyford...  not sure about the authenticity of the white discs/high intensity lamp though!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/Feb_2015_003.jpg.cdf1628c6bbfd76db1c7c02d24bc7f03.jpg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/Feb_2015_005.jpg.0116f7f04401d1181f9653275b9be4ef.jpg

Excellent pictures,

 

Thank you.

 

Having been commissioned to write the Books of the B1s (at least two) for Irwell, I've started my research. As usual, the works of the RCTS and Yeadon are being consulted. Unfortunately, neither lists the dates of livery variations for the individual B1s (which would be far more useful to modellers than boiler numbers), but it's clear that many B1s were turned out in apple green, brand new, post-War, including batches built for BR from 1948 onward (the last-mentioned with 'British Railways' on their tenders). Some had just their LNER numbers (1274-1287) some had an 'E' prefix to their LNER number (E1288-E1303) and some had their full BR number (61304-61339, the last built in September 1948). Later ones were turned out in black and the last ones in full BR lined black. How long any B1s remained in apple green post-Nationalisation is something I've got to research. Earlier-built locos also received apple green at their first repaint.

 

What's the painting time regime for a loco. Three years? Four years? More? I'm certain it's the early '50s before the last B1s went into black (hence my childhood memories of seeing them in green), though does anyone know which was the last one?

 

Changing the subject, it's one of my roles these days to write the book reviews for BRM. What's surprising (or is it?) is the number of B&W pictorial volumes which are being produced, mostly showing the BR steam period. A few are in colour (occasionally indifferent) but the vast majority is in monochrome (some also indifferent). What concerns me is the 'accuracy' or otherwise of several of the captions. Dates clearly wrong, locations clearly wrong, locos/stock identifications clearly wrong, directions clearly wrong (for instance, how can the Harwich-Liverpool boat train, heading westwards across the flat crossing at Retford towards Sheffield be going to Hull?) and so on. Have so many mistakes always been there in railway books? Grammatical proof-reading won't correct these sort of things, though SIR RALPH WEDGEWOOD (note the superfluous 'E') should have been intercepted. What's also disappointing, is that in some cases (very few to be fair) publishers, on seeing my 'corrections', either refuse to send new books for review or threaten to pull their advertising. Most, thankfully, are quite pleased with what I write - I try to be positive.

 

I accept that everything I've ever written probably has a blooper or two in it, and are my reviews always accurate? However, with much 'incorrect' material out there (along with much which is excellent, to be fair) what hope is there for future historical 'accuracy' in our modelling?

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

Edited by Tony Wright
typo error
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43 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Excellent pictures,

 

Thank you.

 

Having been commissioned to write the Books of the B1s (at least two) for Irwell, I've started my research. As usual, the works of the RCTS and Yeadon are being consulted. Unfortunately, neither lists the dates of livery variations for the individual B1s (which would be far more useful to modellers than boiler numbers), but it's clear that many B1s were turned out in apple green, brand new, post-War, including batches built for BR from 1948 onward (the last-mentioned with 'British Railways' on their tenders). Some had just their LNER numbers (1274-1287) some had an 'E' prefix to their LNER number (E1288-E1303) and some had their full BR number (61304-61339, the last built in September 1948). Later ones were turned out in black and the last ones in full BR lined black. How long any B1s remained in apple green post-Nationalisation is something I've got to research. Earlier-built locos also received apple green at their first repaint.

 

What's the painting time regime for a loco. Three years? Four years? More? I'm certain it's the early '50s before the last B1s went into black (hence my childhood memories of seeing them in green), though does anyone know which was the last one?

 

Changing the subject, it's one of my roles these days to write the book reviews for BRM. What's surprising (or is it?) is the number of B&W pictorial volumes which are being produced, mostly showing the BR steam period. A few are in colour (occasionally indifferent) but the vast majority is in monochrome (some also indifferent). What concerns me is the 'accuracy' or otherwise of several of the captions. Dates clearly wrong, locations clearly wrong, locos/stock identifications clearly wrong, directions clearly wrong (for instance, how can the Harwich-Liverpool boat train, heading westwards across the flat crossing at Retford towards Sheffield be going to Hull?) and so on. Have so many mistakes always been there in railway books? Grammatical proof-reading won't correct these sort of things, though SIR RALPH WEDGEWOOD (note the superfluous 'E') should have been intercepted. What's also disappointing, is that in some cases (very few to be fair) publishers, on seeing my 'corrections', either refuse to send new books for review or threaten to pull their advertising. Most, thankfully, are quite pleased with what I write - I try to be positive.

 

I accept that everything I've ever written probably has a blooper or two in it, and are my reviews always accurate? However, with some much 'incorrect' material out there (along with much which is excellent, to be fair) what hope is there for future historical 'accuracy' in our modelling?

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

 

Regarding the books Tony this is something I've been noticing over the last few years and about which I regularly rant to my railway mates..  A case in point is a book, part of a recent large series, that contains information and photographs of particular current interest to me. I picked a copy at a show and it seemed worth purchasing... I was about to buy it when my eyes fell on a caption - a glaring error which anyone familiar with railways in Cornwall would have spotted instantly. I put book back and possibly I'll buy one when they are remaindered on Amazon for £10.00...

 

My take on any media is that if I (who knows relatively little) can spot mistakes how accurate is the rest?

 

I fear the situation is  getting worse or possibly as my own knowledge has improved maybe I notice the errors more? More likely I feel is the sad fact that many (most?) of the original photographers are no longer with us and so cannot advise the 'authors' and publishers. Of course we all make mistakes but there are limits.

 

On a positive note at the same show I bought a copy of 'Western Ways' containing photos by R C Riley. There are long informative captions which seem well researched. There may well be the odd error but I certainly haven't spotted one. The series, published by Transport Treasury,  is well worth keeping an eye on. No connection,  just a satisfied reader.

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Changing the subject, it's one of my roles these days to write the book reviews for BRM. What's surprising (or is it?) is the number of B&W pictorial volumes which are being produced, mostly showing the BR steam period. A few are in colour (occasionally indifferent) but the vast majority is in monochrome (some also indifferent). What concerns me is the 'accuracy' or otherwise of several of the captions. Dates clearly wrong, locations clearly wrong, locos/stock identifications clearly wrong, directions clearly wrong (for instance, how can the Harwich-Liverpool boat train, heading westwards across the flat crossing at Retford towards Sheffield be going to Hull?) and so on.

I couldn't agree more. I find it very frustrating to see some of the ill-informed captions in steam era books. It's not that it affects me directly but I think of all those enthusiastic people who have become interested in railways, whether for modelling or not, and in spite of their commendable efforts to get to the bottom of where and how the railways ran, they are misled and confused by people who really should not be doing the captions to these books - at least not without some (true) expert proof reading.  (I can excuse the isolated mistake but there are some books that are riddled mistakes and uninformed comment). I would add that the photographs in these books are often excellent which makes the poor captioning even more frustrating.

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49 minutes ago, TrevorP1 said:

 

Regarding the books Tony this is something I've been noticing over the last few years and about which I regularly rant to my railway mates..  A case in point is a book, part of a recent large series, that contains information and photographs of particular current interest to me. I picked a copy at a show and it seemed worth purchasing... I was about to buy it when my eyes fell on a caption - a glaring error which anyone familiar with railways in Cornwall would have spotted instantly. I put book back and possibly I'll buy one when they are remaindered on Amazon for £10.00...

 

My take on any media is that if I (who knows relatively little) can spot mistakes how accurate is the rest?

 

I fear the situation is  getting worse or possibly as my own knowledge has improved maybe I notice the errors more? More likely I feel is the sad fact that many (most?) of the original photographers are no longer with us and so cannot advise the 'authors' and publishers. Of course we all make mistakes but there are limits.

 

On a positive note at the same show I bought a copy of 'Western Ways' containing photos by R C Riley. There are long informative captions which seem well researched. There may well be the odd error but I certainly haven't spotted one. The series, published by Transport Treasury,  is well worth keeping an eye on. No connection,  just a satisfied reader.

Thanks Trevor,

 

You're right about most of the photographers no longer being with us. 

 

That said, I've fallen too many times into the trap of believing what's in a caption attached to a picture/transparency, written by the picture-taker (often now deceased), which is a work of total fiction. Keith Pirt, though a brilliant photographer, was among the worst. I stupidly just copied and pasted a caption to a picture of his in a book I wrote recently for Booklaw, which had the date out by two years! What was more irritating was that I should have known this - late at night, meeting a deadline, excuses, excuses, excuses.......................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Excellent pictures,

 

Thank you.

 

Having been commissioned to write the Books of the B1s (at least two) for Irwell, I've started my research. As usual, the works of the RCTS and Yeadon are being consulted. Unfortunately, neither lists the dates of livery variations for the individual B1s (which would be far more useful to modellers than boiler numbers), but it's clear that many B1s were turned out in apple green, brand new, post-War, including batches built for BR from 1948 onward (the last-mentioned with 'British Railways' on their tenders). Some had just their LNER numbers (1274-1287) some had an 'E' prefix to their LNER number (E1288-E1303) and some had their full BR number (61304-61339, the last built in September 1948). Later ones were turned out in black and the last ones in full BR lined black. How long any B1s remained in apple green post-Nationalisation is something I've got to research. Earlier-built locos also received apple green at their first repaint.

 

What's the painting time regime for a loco. Three years? Four years? More? I'm certain it's the early '50s before the last B1s went into black (hence my childhood memories of seeing them in green), though does anyone know which was the last one?

 

Changing the subject, it's one of my roles these days to write the book reviews for BRM. What's surprising (or is it?) is the number of B&W pictorial volumes which are being produced, mostly showing the BR steam period. A few are in colour (occasionally indifferent) but the vast majority is in monochrome (some also indifferent). What concerns me is the 'accuracy' or otherwise of several of the captions. Dates clearly wrong, locations clearly wrong, locos/stock identifications clearly wrong, directions clearly wrong (for instance, how can the Harwich-Liverpool boat train, heading westwards across the flat crossing at Retford towards Sheffield be going to Hull?) and so on. Have so many mistakes always been there in railway books? Grammatical proof-reading won't correct these sort of things, though SIR RALPH WEDGEWOOD (note the superfluous 'E') should have been intercepted. What's also disappointing, is that in some cases (very few to be fair) publishers, on seeing my 'corrections', either refuse to send new books for review or threaten to pull their advertising. Most, thankfully, are quite pleased with what I write - I try to be positive.

 

I accept that everything I've ever written probably has a blooper or two in it, and are my reviews always accurate? However, with much 'incorrect' material out there (along with much which is excellent, to be fair) what hope is there for future historical 'accuracy' in our modelling?

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

 

Regarding B1 liveries, as new locomotives entered into service through the early transitional years, if you don’t have primary data for the B1’s it would be reasonable to extrapolate transitional dates from other classes with better documentation, as an approximation.  For example, we know that it was in a May 1949 that the first A3’s appeared in express passenger blue, with the cycling lion logo.  With the exception of experimental liveries, Apple green with ‘BRITISH RAILWAYS’ lettering would have been applied to repaints prior to this date.  I’m not aware that the cycling lion totem was ever used on an Apple green painted locomotive, but you can never be sure...!

 

Of course the only accurate way to track this for the Bongoes would be to trawl through all the photographs available to you, cross referencing with manufacturing dates and that of other members of the class in time order.  Tedious at best.

 

In the case of the A3’s, two stick out as retaining the Apple green livery for longer than the rest of the class:  60070 Gladiateur and 60076 Galopin, both of which went straight into Brunswick Green in Jan/Feb 1952.  As ever, this is not information from a primary source, so comes with a caveat!  Nonetheless, You can get a good indication of what each works was turning out at any given date (which of course was not necessarily the same across all the works!)

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2 hours ago, Chamby said:

 

Regarding B1 liveries, as new locomotives entered into service through the early transitional years, if you don’t have primary data for the B1’s it would be reasonable to extrapolate transitional dates from other classes with better documentation, as an approximation.  For example, we know that it was in a May 1949 that the first A3’s appeared in express passenger blue, with the cycling lion logo.  With the exception of experimental liveries, Apple green with ‘BRITISH RAILWAYS’ lettering would have been applied to repaints prior to this date.  I’m not aware that the cycling lion totem was ever used on an Apple green painted locomotive, but you can never be sure...!

 

Of course the only accurate way to track this for the Bongoes would be to trawl through all the photographs available to you, cross referencing with manufacturing dates and that of other members of the class in time order.  Tedious at best.

 

In the case of the A3’s, two stick out as retaining the Apple green livery for longer than the rest of the class:  60070 Gladiateur and 60076 Galopin, both of which went straight into Brunswick Green in Jan/Feb 1952.  As ever, this is not information from a primary source, so comes with a caveat!  Nonetheless, You can get a good indication of what each works was turning out at any given date (which of course was not necessarily the same across all the works!)

 

 

I don't think you can really extrapolate.  It just about works for things like adoption of the new emblem or curly 6s at a particular loco works, but even then there are variations class to class.  The B1s are a nightmare because of their time of introduction and the detail variations within the batches.  The number of different manufacturers who may or may not have been following the right paint information has a bearing too (not B1s but think of the lovely lining job Beyer-Peacock did on some (?) of their J39s in a livery that had long ceased to be applied to the rest of the class - one of the reasons 1856 is the manufacturer's choice for an LNER J39).  Like Headstock my time of interest is circa 1950.  Gorton was allocated at that time a batch of Vulcan Foundry B1s which were mostly (if not all - I don't have my books to hand to check) delivered in green.  You'd think they'd all look the same, but in that small number at one point in 1950, most would be in lined black, but some had BRITISH RAILWAYS in full, some had the first BR lion, at least one had a blank space tender side apart from the lining, one was in well-kept plain black and if you add in Darnall locos from the same batch you could have a green one.  All of those with electric lighting fittings (or at least remains of), but most with the Metropolitan-Vickers axle-mounted generator to power the lights lost somewhere in the cess. 

 

Simon

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My Hornby B1 a simple renumber and name job, this was the only Apple Green named B1 I found a photo off, that matched the Hornby configuration. Lovely Loco well done Hornby.

 

post-7186-0-27269500-1476453683.jpgpost-7186-0-38898100-1476453698.jpg

Edited by micklner
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