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Tony Wright

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

 

In the top example, could the rear lubricator be slightly bigger?

 

 

Both lubricators look the same to me, except that the rear one appears to additionally have a lid on it, or something similar.

 

 

Edited by Chamby
Added ‘to me’ because others might see it differently...

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1 minute ago, Chamby said:

I was taught that with ‘its’, the apostrophe is added when it can also be written in full as ‘it is’.  

 

So “Its skin” refers to the skin of the banana in your example, but “It’s skin” could be used elsewhere if clarifying that it is skin (rather than something else).

 

The auto-correct function on my iPad doesn’t always get it right, so it’s often necessary to correct its intervention.

Yes I agree. I was taught the same but for once, I understand why some people get confused.

 

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15 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks for all your recent comments, Alan,

 

Good to have you on here. 

 

Thanks Tony - I tend to post my progress mainly on the N Gauge Forum, but always read this thread for inspiration of folks building things, and see what kit you are rattling through building at any particular time!

 

As I know you like seeing similar, a couple of snaps of my current projects for you - N gauge remember, so cruel enlargements:

 

Southern region Z class 0-8-0 tank - one of 3 I've been asked to build with specific details relating to specific class members:

 

49196218951_84d323fe59_z.jpg

 

Back on the eastern, I am coming close to finishing a second of Steve's (Atso) D49s - and yes, the valve gear is wrong, but I'm leaving it until a credible alternative can be thought of (origin is Dapol Schools class RTR chassis)!

 

49195718148_cb8d49362c_z.jpg

 

Cheers,
Alan

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I get confused when you have a person's name ending in an s. So if you wanted to write Giles' train is it correct to have the apostrophe where I've put it? What happens if two friends both called Giles each had a part share of a locomotive?

Edited by Anglian
Other posts beat me to it

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3 minutes ago, Anglian said:

I get confused when you have a person's name ending in an s. So if you wanted to write Giles' train is it correct to have the apostrophe where I've put it? What happens if two friends both called Giles each had a part share of a locomotive?

No. Surely it's Giles's.

The second part is too unlikely!

Edited by Clem

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1 hour ago, Jesse Sim said:

You’ve already helped a tremendous amount Tony, you started the tender kit and gave me the pieces to finish it off, sourcing handrails myself won’t be a trouble at all. 
 

I think it turned out rather nice don’t you think? 

It has!

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1 hour ago, Clem said:

I've never knowingly got this wrong, but I can understand probably more than any other grammatical spelling mistake why people do. Where is the the logic of saying "john's, Christine's, the people's, all in the possessive mode by adding an apostrophe before the "s" but when it comes to a logically identical case of possession for an inanimate object (but only for the pronoun, mind you) , it becomes "its" without the apostrophe. You've got to admit that it's logic gone bananas. Even a banana skin is a banana's skin.... but it's "its skin" when using the pronoun. Nuts. But I still follow this same illogical rule.

Thanks Clem,

 

It is bananas! 

 

On travelling along the Norfolk lanes one day between here and our younger son in Norwich, Mo and I chuckled at a rustic sign proclaiming DEANS LOG'S!

 

Grammar has been mentioned on here many times before, and I know it's a sensitive subject to some. I know I commit too many bloopers, but it's easily done. 

 

Where I do find it 'important' is where if one (the generic 'one') is making a case, often slightly contentious (me?), its impact is lessened if the English it's written in is grammatically-ambiguous. 

 

However, I hope that doesn't put folk off posting. That would never do! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Anglian said:

I get confused when you have a person's name ending in an s. So if you wanted to write Giles' train is it correct to have the apostrophe where I've put it? What happens if two friends both called Giles each had a part share of a locomotive?

My head hurts!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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6 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Clem,

 

It is bananas! 

 

On travelling along the Norfolk lanes one day between here and our younger son in Norwich, Mo and I chuckled at a rustic sign proclaiming DEANS LOG'S!

 

Grammar has been mentioned on here many times before, and I know it's a sensitive subject to some. I know I commit too many bloopers, but it's easily done. 

 

Where I do find it 'important' is where if one (the generic 'one') is making a case, often slightly contentious (me?), its impact is lessened if the English it's written in is grammatically-ambiguous. 

 

However, I hope that doesn't put folk off posting. That would never do! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

I've never been irritated much less offended, I just take it as more knowledge and try to do better.  Before moving to Wales I lived around the corner from 'Green's Close', or was it 'Greens Close'. The signs were different on opposite sides of the road...

 

Many years ago I learned a little Italian. Our teacher, a young Italian girl, was genuinely surprised at our lack of knowledge of the 'mechanics' of English. Mind you she could also speak Spanish, German French and Russian... My wife's son is another linguist. He is fluent and colloquial in Japanese and is currently undertaking an intensive course in Arabic.

 

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It's all the fault of the Normans for bringing French features into the English language, on top of the established features from the Germanic family of languages. Hence we now have words ending in 's' to denote possession (a Germanic feature I believe) and words ending in 's' to denote the plural (French). It would have been much easier to stick to 'en' for plurals, as in oxen and children, eliminating the possessive apostrophe.

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

It looks excellent Jesse,

 

Well done.

 

Short handrail pillars and .45mm nickel silver wire, available from Wizard/Comet, Alan Gibson or Markits. 

 

I should have thought when you were here - I've got loads.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I've got some 0.45mm brass wire, Slaters I think. You're welcome to a length or two. I might even have some handrail pillars.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Clem,

 

It is bananas! 

 

On travelling along the Norfolk lanes one day between here and our younger son in Norwich, Mo and I chuckled at a rustic sign proclaiming DEANS LOG'S!

 

Grammar has been mentioned on here many times before, and I know it's a sensitive subject to some. I know I commit too many bloopers, but it's easily done. 

 

Where I do find it 'important' is where if one (the generic 'one') is making a case, often slightly contentious (me?), its impact is lessened if the English it's written in is grammatically-ambiguous. 

 

However, I hope that doesn't put folk off posting. That would never do! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

Over here apostrophes in place names, street names and the like were abolished years ago, which makes life simpler but does result in oddities such as Frenchs Forest.

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How does "Dave's Dad's dog's dead" stack up? (once used as an excuse for why 'Dave' didn't turn up for work one day)

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3 hours ago, Clem said:

Yes I agree. I was taught the same but for once, I understand why some people get confused.

 

It's really very simple - "Its" is a Possessive Pronoun therefore by definition it doesn't require an apostrophe. "It's" is an abbreviation for "It is" where the apostrophe represents the missing letter. By combining the two words into one, the apostrophe more accurately replicates how the word is pronounced in normal speech. If you miss out the apostrophe, then it allows you to add emphasis in speech on to one or other of the two words - as you wish.

My generation learnt all of this in school and the use of the apostrophe is second nature. 

 

"Dave's dad's dog's dead" is a nonsense as "dog's dead" isn't an acceptable abbreviation [in the written form of english] for "dog is dead". Just because what you hear sounds like that, doesn't mean that you can write it like that. In the days when dictation and comprehension still formed part of scholastic testing of english in exams, that would be a fail - whatever part of the country you lived in.

 

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Hi Tony,  Thinking back to a conversation earlier this year in which you recommended the Poppy’s Woodtech jig for chassis building, I am a bout to finally get round to ordering one one before I start my next loco build.  
 

bit I have a question to clarify before I do.  Given they are available in several different lengths, is there any down side in just buying the biggest version available? Or are smaller versions better suited to different chassis lengths?  
 

my expectation is that most of what I will build will be six coupled.  However there will be at least one 4 coupled loco next year (Bulldog) and at some point in the future there’s a good chance of building something that is longer (I fancy a WD 2-10-0 as a one day build...)  So given it’s only a couple of pounds extra I was thinking I should just buy the 5 axle version.   Before I do I just wanted to check there are no downsides 

 

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4 minutes ago, The Fatadder said:

Hi Tony,  Thinking back to a conversation earlier this year in which you recommended the Poppy’s Woodtech jig for chassis building, I am a bout to finally get round to ordering one one before I start my next loco build.  
 

bit I have a question to clarify before I do.  Given they are available in several different lengths, is there any down side in just buying the biggest version available? Or are smaller versions better suited to different chassis lengths?  
 

my expectation is that most of what I will build will be six coupled.  However there will be at least one 4 coupled loco next year (Bulldog) and at some point in the future there’s a good chance of building something that is longer (I fancy a WD 2-10-0 as a one day build...)  So given it’s only a couple of pounds extra I was thinking I should just buy the 5 axle version.   Before I do I just wanted to check there are no downsides 

 

Good afternoon Rich,

 

Regarding the Poppy's Wood jig, any chassis can be built on the largest one, whatever the number of drivers it has. It's not the same the other way around.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Edited by Tony Wright
typo error
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Every day's a school day, as the saying goes; or should that be everyday's? Or, everyday is.........? 

 

I've  just found out that the lubricators really aren't in line on the V2s (all you kit-makers have got it wrong!) and that the cab roof ventilators are opposite to each other in the way they open.

 

And yet I was consulted as a so-called 'expert' on such matters to pass on my findings. 'Head' and 'big' spring to mind! 

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54 minutes ago, Arun Sharma said:

It's really very simple - "Its" is a Possessive Pronoun therefore by definition it doesn't require an apostrophe. "It's" is an abbreviation for "It is" where the apostrophe represents the missing letter. By combining the two words into one, the apostrophe more accurately replicates how the word is pronounced in normal speech. If you miss out the apostrophe, then it allows you to add emphasis in speech on to one or other of the two words - as you wish.

My generation learnt all of this in school and the use of the apostrophe is second nature. 

yes Arun, I've always understood it. My comment was really about why some people might get confused. Rules are easy when you learn them. However, some people find rules hard unless they can see the reasoning, the logic behind it. My comment was about why some people get that one wrong. Their logic behind the mistake.

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3 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

I've got some 0.45mm brass wire, Slaters I think. You're welcome to a length or two. I might even have some handrail pillars.

 

Should that be Slaters'?  Or if they have sold it and no longer possess it, does it lose the apostrophe?

 

This is a good game!

 

 

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4 hours ago, gr.king said:

It's all the fault of the Normans for bringing French features into the English language, on top of the established features from the Germanic family of languages. Hence we now have words ending in 's' to denote possession (a Germanic feature I believe) and words ending in 's' to denote the plural (French). It would have been much easier to stick to 'en' for plurals, as in oxen and children, eliminating the possessive apostrophe.

Now, Mr King don't you blame my ancestor because you Danes wouldn't learn a proper language.

 

Quote

We must look to France for the early origins of the name Mortimore. For it is here that early records this family descends from Walter, Lord of St. Martin, Normandy who married a niece of the Duchess Gunnora c. 980. Roger, Sire de Mortimer was a leader of the army of Duke William and helped defeat the French in 1054. His son Roger de Mortimer was a leader at the Battle of Hastings and was granted a great barony for his efforts. From him, descended the Lords Mortimer of Wigmore, Earls of March. The name, however, is a reference to the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Moretemer, in the Seine-Maritime region of Normandy. [1] Mortemer derives from the Old French "mort," meaning "dead," and "mer," meaning "sea."

 And here is a picture of Roger de Mortimore

209.jpg.aa5553551c91aa70f7a8547bd62fc830.jpg

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13 minutes ago, Clem said:

I'm approaching completion of the signal box with just guttering, roof slates, name boards and outside step board (not sure what you call it) plus some final bits of painting. A quick question for 4mm building people (I've seen some great work on here). What do you use for guttering that's to scale?

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4239.JPG.36209e9dbe60e2b9e39e921b19b946c6.JPGhttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4240.JPG.89f0f5f8f7fb6fefaa69e162f3d8f61b.JPG

 

Edited by micknich2003
Clem, what have you used to colour the rails etc? It all looks very realistic.
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On 10/12/2019 at 08:06, Tony Wright said:

Good morning David,

 

I've only glanced at the latest Isinglass 3D-printed Gresley stock, and, without doubt, it's far superior to what was first available. I made-up one of Andy Edgson's original GE Section BTKs and it wasn't very good (I'll see if I can find the pictures). The 'witness marks' were like a wash-board! 

 

The new 'alternative media' might well make any cars lighter than those constructed in 'traditional' brass/nickel silver/white metal, but I'm not sure they'll be for me. The Mousa Models single resin casting ex-GNR Brake Third I made turned out very well, and that medium suits paneled carriages very nicely, but it had to be glued together, and I don't really like glue! I also replaced the resin trussing with brass section because the former just broke as I cut it from the parent sprues. 

 

No, all-metal in my case, despite the weight. It's just a compatibility thing with me, I suppose. I've built very heavy trains (I don't add weight, by the way), and I build heavy (and powerful) locos to pull them. For those more-reliant on RTR motive power, then the new media might just be what's needed.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.    

Thanks Tony, I spoke with one of the guys on the LNER society stand. Positively singing the praises of the 3D isinglass prints. I think he'll be at expo em I'll take a look then.

Edited by davidw

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12 minutes ago, micknich2003 said:

Clem, what have you used to colour the rails etc? It all looks very realistic.

Hi Mick,

It's been a while since I did it. It think it was Phoenix Precision can't remember for definite what shade but I pretty sure it was bog standard track colour.

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4 hours ago, The Fatadder said:

Hi Tony,  Thinking back to a conversation earlier this year in which you recommended the Poppy’s Woodtech jig for chassis building, I am a bout to finally get round to ordering one one before I start my next loco build.  
 

bit I have a question to clarify before I do.  Given they are available in several different lengths, is there any down side in just buying the biggest version available? Or are smaller versions better suited to different chassis lengths?  
 

my expectation is that most of what I will build will be six coupled.  However there will be at least one 4 coupled loco next year (Bulldog) and at some point in the future there’s a good chance of building something that is longer (I fancy a WD 2-10-0 as a one day build...)  So given it’s only a couple of pounds extra I was thinking I should just buy the 5 axle version.   Before I do I just wanted to check there are no downsides 

 

I initially bought the 6 coupled box but quickly found that it wouldn't take short wheelbases (I build quite a lot of these) but the 8 coupled box would. I now have both boxes but only one set of dummy axles and can cope with most wheelbases. I've never used a frame building jig before, thinking they were too complicated and expensive but the Poppy's jig is cheap and very effective.

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