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Tony Wright

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8 hours ago, Arun Sharma said:

Tony - Do have any particular views on the strength/springiness of equal thicknesses of phosphor-bronze wire versus nickel-silver wire as used in pickups?

 

Arun

Good morning Arun,

 

I do - I cannot get on with phosphor-bronze. 

 

I'm sure it's ability to conduct electricity is second to none, but I can never get the 'springiness' right. It's not as robust as nickel silver, and I find it far more difficult to adjust. 

 

At the Glasgow Show earlier this year, I was handed a couple of locos built by others and asked 'Can you make these run?'. I've never seen such a mess of phosphor-bronze pick-ups - wiggled, bent, protruding here and there and utterly hopeless. I got them running, but substituted .45mm nickel silver in places. 

 

I don't know whether the pick-ups on some RTR locos are phosphor bronze, but, in my experience, they're equally hopeless - flimsy little things, with very weak springiness. The situation is exacerbated by there being so much sideways slop to enable the things to go around train set curves. I replace them with .45mm nickel silver.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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8 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Cor Blimey Tony

 

That makes my control panel look inadequate. 

100_5769.JPG.12c90a234eff46c967665d2cb6783060.JPG

But it's adequate for your needs, Clive,

 

Surely, that is enough.......

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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7 hours ago, DougN said:

Thanks for the pickup photos Tony. As most know  have been building the V2's, yesterday I sat down to build my most hated item on the chassis..... the brake gear,  as I always manage to get it to work perfectly every time.... ie the loco is stopped dead by it! So I am being extremely careful. (I can hear murmurings from the back of he "started with pickups") I think the photo below perfectly sums up the great design by Martin Finney.... but what about the room for the pickups! IMG_0829.JPG.d96efb83913aa76ba662fdc0d9c6533f.JPG

 

yes there is pull rods that go back on themselves leaving precious little space for pickups let alone space to get some copper clad to mount them on! 

Good morning Doug,

 

Your approach is much 'purer' than mine.

 

A glance at the pictures I posted last night will reveal I'll happily omit certain details, or nibble them away so that they don't interfere with pick-ups. Springs, for instance.

 

In my defence, by the time everything else is on, from 'normal' viewing angles those omissions are invisible (a curious turn of phrase, I admit). I'll often substitute .45mm brass wire for the cross-pieces, because it takes up far less space.

 

Pragmatism?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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19 minutes ago, grahame said:

even with my limited abilities

Come off it!

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10 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

Come off it!

 

Oh, I don't know. I might be able to do a bit of cutting and gluing of card and plastic, but don't expect me to work with metal and solder. . . . 

 

I know that's heresy on this thread and could get me thrown off.

;-)

 

 

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12 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good evening Andy,

 

Why doesn't your A5 work well? 

 

One thing I do with all the locos I build is to ensure that the chassis works perfectly before I'll contemplate building the body. Yes, if it's got outside cylinders/valve gear, these are left to the last, but the chassis must run round the layout perfectly in 'naked' form before any work commences on the body. 

 

You seem to have all but built the A5 bodywork, yet you say it doesn't work well. Could it be that the bodywork is causing some problems? 

 

How is the chassis configured? Compensated? If so, solder it all up solid. You'll be surprised at how much better it'll run if rigid! 

 

Don't get worried. When this is all over, arrange another visit up here and I'll look at it for you.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Thanks for your encouragement Tony,

 

I did (as taught!) start on the chassis and got it finished, but couldn’t find the motor main gear grub screw. Peter at 52F models kindly sent me a replacement FOC but I built the body while I was waiting for it. 

 

However, the chassis is problematic with or without the body. I think there are a number of issues including:

1. There is very little slop in the frames so shorting may be an issue

2. It is compensated but there’s no mention of springing in the instructions and I’m not quite sure what I’m supposed to do (short of soldering it up solid). I want to try to get the compensation to work as an experiment having never tried it before. Even if I was to  ‘de-compensate’ it, I presume I would need some sort of jig which I don’t possess (cue howls of anguish!).

3. I suspect the main problem may be that it is designed for finer scales (EM/P4) and more experienced modellers than 00/me!

 

Too be honest I haven’t spent very long on it so far so it is not a reflection on the kit... more on me. I find I need to psyche myself up for this bit, find a few spare hours and bury my head in a wet towel! I’ve been too busy for that. 

 

I should also say that I don’t think I have ever got a kit built loco working satisfactorily without either plonking it on a RTR chassis (still a good solution in my book) or a visit to ‘Dr Wright‘  for you to tweak something that I’ve got wrong - last time If you remember it was opening out the holes in the coupling rods on my SE Finecast J6. So a trip to Little Bytham towers would be much appreciated in due course but I suspect I will have plenty of time to attempt to fix it myself before then!

 

All the above sounds a little depressing but I don’t think I’m atypical of moderately experienced modellers in struggling with this, which, to I bring this thread back too a familiar topic, is why RTR is so ‘all conquering’. It’s also why I tend to stick to coaches - I know I can get them to work. And I can turn one out in a reasonable length of time.

 

Have you finished one of the three kits you showed us yet?!

 

Andy

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

Thanks for your encouragement Tony,

 

I did (as taught!) start on the chassis and got it finished, but couldn’t find the motor main gear grub screw. Peter at 52F models kindly sent me a replacement FOC but I built the body while I was waiting for it. 

 

However, the chassis is problematic with or without the body. I think there are a number of issues including:

1. There is very little slop in the frames so shorting may be an issue

2. It is compensated but there’s no mention of springing in the instructions and I’m not quite sure what I’m supposed to do (short of soldering it up solid). I want to try to get the compensation to work as an experiment having never tried it before. Even if I was to  ‘de-compensate’ it, I presume I would need some sort of jig which I don’t possess (cue howls of anguish!).

3. I suspect the main problem may be that it is designed for finer scales (EM/P4) and more experienced modellers than 00/me!

 

Too be honest I haven’t spent very long on it so far so it is not a reflection on the kit... more on me. I find I need to psyche myself up for this bit, find a few spare hours and bury my head in a wet towel! I’ve been too busy for that. 

 

I should also say that I don’t think I have ever got a kit built loco working satisfactorily without either plonking it on a RTR chassis (still a good solution in my book) or a visit to ‘Dr Wright‘  for you to tweak something that I’ve got wrong - last time If you remember it was opening out the holes in the coupling rods on my SE Finecast J6. So a trip to Little Bytham towers would be much appreciated in due course but I suspect I will have plenty of time to attempt to fix it myself before then!

 

All the above sounds a little depressing but I don’t think I’m atypical of moderately experienced modellers in struggling with this, which, to I bring this thread back too a familiar topic, is why RTR is so ‘all conquering’. It’s also why I tend to stick to coaches - I know I can get them to work. And I can turn one out in a reasonable length of time.

 

Have you finished one of the three kits you showed us yet?!

 

Andy

 

 

 

The chassis doesn't use springing. There should be a litle movement up and down on the driving wheels. Did the wheels move freely before you got the grub screw for the motor? Did you use a quartering tool or did you do it by eye? The gauge has nothing to do with whether compensation works. When you say there may be a short, what pickup system are you using? Are the pickups touching the chassis?

 

Paul

Edited by Paul Cram
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2 hours ago, Clem said:

 

I entirely agree, Andy. In the time it's taken me to get about 95% complete with my DJH WD, Tony has produced 4 superb creations. But my (feeble) excuse is that mine is sprung on a scratch built chassis for EM and it's the first time I've attempted a DJH WD. It has been challenging at times but hopefully the next one will be a bit easier, now I know what to look out for. The clearances are tight but OK. Just the injectors and associated pipe work (and new injector covers - the DJH ones are quite under scale), sandboxes, front lamp brackets and front vac pipe to add before painting.

 

Tony, I know you don't like compensated or sprung chassis but my track work/pointwork is nothing like as good as yours and I find a sprung or compensated chassis mitigates this. 

 

 

Very nice, Clem,

 

It's each to their own. Your WD runs exceptionally well, and if it's because of compensation, then that's good. 

 

However, mine run just as well, and they're rigid. I also doubt if my trackwork/pointwork in the fiddle yard (which I laid) is better than that which you've made/laid. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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1 hour ago, 31A said:

In terms of what have we done during the lockdown, I seem to have started lots of things but not finished many, so I haven't updated my layout thread for a long time as I prefer to show things I've actually finished.  Nevertheless there's been a lot going on!

 

I thought I'd make an inroad into my stash of wagon kits, and indeed I did build two Parkside LNER Loco Coal wagons.

 

P1030026.jpg.f34f33720427edcfc150dfe0ab8f741c.jpg

 

And finished a couple of kits that had been hanging around unfinished for years - Chivers ballast wagon, and Ratio banana van:

 

IMG_3311.jpg.0524f1811f9922426d8998abd0ba2736.jpg

 

IMG_3314.jpg.11c319b54e4aa0d02767a87beeeb9a43.jpg

 

 

Then I realised if I built more wagons, I'd run out of room to store them!

 

So I've concentrated on 'infrastructure' and scenic items; a lot of this has been in the loco yard area.

 

IMG_3286.jpg.0839b59b6d930635b265a7b419bb0b9c.jpg

 

This area has since been ballasted, and there are puddles:

 

IMG_3313.jpg.a0523df60311f7c29348a0aa8301792f.jpg

 

Attention turned to the retaining walls in the background, which now have cabling running along them:

 

IMG_3335.jpg.116cb58ae46fa975b4be9bc83b0f6427.jpg

 

The lines here have since been ballasted too, and the cabling had to go somewhere so it now goes over the bridge.

 

IMG_3336.jpg.ba85137f134dd8e458348fe960589d7b.jpg

 

At the other end of this area, the girder bridge that marks the entrance to the fiddle yard is just about finished, or near enough so that it can carry the bus.

 

IMG_3374.jpg.ed97011ec38a77b3336c83c9780840e0.jpg

 

And to go next to it, this signal box is a work in progress; Great Northernisation of a Wills kit:

 

IMG_3379.jpg.5ede73b192cc60abda4c6a5c3c9d50d7.jpg

 

 

 

Wonderful work, Steve,

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Personal modelling at its very best........................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Paul Cram said:

The chassis doesn't use springing. There should be a litle movement up and down on the driving wheels. Did the wheels move freely before you got the grub screw for the motor? Did you use a quartering tool or did you do it by eye? The gauge has nothing to do with whether compensation works. When you say there may be a short, what pickup system are you using? Are the pickups touching the chassis?

 

Paul

Paul,

 

There is movement up and down, but only if I push - it’s quite stiff, possibly because the motor unit is fitting inside an OO frame?The wheels run fairly freely without the grub and when I apply power it does run - just not very smoothly. As I say, I need more fettling time and I’m not blaming the kit. Quartering is by Romfords - I chose not to use the recommended Gibsons. I’m using the sprung plunger pick ups recommended by the kit, but half expecting to replace them with ‘sir’ style nickel silver wipers. I think the shorts are when the wheel rim touches the frames.

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Wonderful work, Steve,

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Personal modelling at its very best........................

 

 

Yes, and nice range of interesting modelling subjects and projects. Super effects and realistic results.

Edited by grahame
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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

Thanks for your encouragement Tony,

 

I did (as taught!) start on the chassis and got it finished, but couldn’t find the motor main gear grub screw. Peter at 52F models kindly sent me a replacement FOC but I built the body while I was waiting for it. 

 

However, the chassis is problematic with or without the body. I think there are a number of issues including:

1. There is very little slop in the frames so shorting may be an issue

2. It is compensated but there’s no mention of springing in the instructions and I’m not quite sure what I’m supposed to do (short of soldering it up solid). I want to try to get the compensation to work as an experiment having never tried it before. Even if I was to  ‘de-compensate’ it, I presume I would need some sort of jig which I don’t possess (cue howls of anguish!).

3. I suspect the main problem may be that it is designed for finer scales (EM/P4) and more experienced modellers than 00/me!

 

Too be honest I haven’t spent very long on it so far so it is not a reflection on the kit... more on me. I find I need to psyche myself up for this bit, find a few spare hours and bury my head in a wet towel! I’ve been too busy for that. 

 

I should also say that I don’t think I have ever got a kit built loco working satisfactorily without either plonking it on a RTR chassis (still a good solution in my book) or a visit to ‘Dr Wright‘  for you to tweak something that I’ve got wrong - last time If you remember it was opening out the holes in the coupling rods on my SE Finecast J6. So a trip to Little Bytham towers would be much appreciated in due course but I suspect I will have plenty of time to attempt to fix it myself before then!

 

All the above sounds a little depressing but I don’t think I’m atypical of moderately experienced modellers in struggling with this, which, to I bring this thread back too a familiar topic, is why RTR is so ‘all conquering’. It’s also why I tend to stick to coaches - I know I can get them to work. And I can turn one out in a reasonable length of time.

 

Have you finished one of the three kits you showed us yet?!

 

Andy

 

 

 

Good afternoon Andy,

 

I haven't finished any of the kits in the boxes I pictured, but they've all been opened.

 

'(cue howls of anguish!).'

 

Indeed! 

 

How anyone can contemplate getting a loco chassis to run well without its being assembled on a jig of some description, I have no idea. Even where frames have screw-together, turned spacers (SEF, for instance), I'll still check everything for accuracy by using jig axles (Markits/LRM), adjusting as necessary. Your A5 chassis could be made rigid by employing jig axles.  

 

As mentioned with regard to the J17 of late, though all the etched spacers' tabs fitted perfectly into the etched frames' slots, after a couple of initial tack joints, it was clear I would end up with a parallelogram. Using a jig sorted the problem out. 

 

As for missing grubscrews - why not order spares? I have dozens, bought from Markits as part of much larger orders. The floors of railway modellers' workshops must be littered with tiny (but vital) bits which ping into oblivion! I also order crankpins/crankpin washers by the hundred, rather than in packs of six or eight. 

 

All-conquering RTR? Yes, and isn't the model railway scene the duller for it, with far too many identical items seen on layouts and in the media (both electronic and paper)? One could argue that LB has far too many Bachmann Mk.1s, though all have been modified/improved. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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10 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

Paul,

 

There is movement up and down, but only if I push - it’s quite stiff, possibly because the motor unit is fitting inside an OO frame?The wheels run fairly freely without the grub and when I apply power it does run - just not very smoothly. As I say, I need more fettling time and I’m not blaming the kit. Quartering is by Romfords - I chose not to use the recommended Gibsons. I’m using the sprung plunger pick ups recommended by the kit, but half expecting to replace them with ‘sir’ style nickel silver wipers. I think the shorts are when the wheel rim touches the frames.

 

Andy

Good afternoon again, Andy,

 

Did you put a one eight taper reamer through the driving wheel bearings after they were inserted? And, also, did you put that same reamer through the driven axle's bearings and the gearbox's bearings at the same time? 

 

It's my experience that one eighth bearings and one eighth axles produce a friction-fit without this procedure.

 

By inserting one eighth Peco fibre washers on the axles on the insulated side, the wheel rims won't touch the frames. If you're not sure where a short might be, wait until dark, then run the chassis at full voltage - you'll soon see where there are any shorts!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good afternoon Andy,

 

I haven't finished any of the kits in the boxes I pictured, but they've all been opened.

 

'(cue howls of anguish!).'

 

Indeed! 

 

How anyone can contemplate getting a loco chassis to run well without its being assembled on a jig of some description, I have no idea. Even where frames have screw-together, turned spacers (SEF, for instance), I'll still check everything for accuracy by using jig axles (Markits/LRM), adjusting as necessary. Your A5 chassis could be made rigid by employing jig axles.  

 

As mentioned with regard to the J17 of late, though all the etched spacers' tabs fitted perfectly into the etched frames' slots, after a couple of initial tack joints, it was clear I would end up with a parallelogram. Using a jig sorted the problem out. 

 

As for missing grubscrews - why not order spares? I have dozens, bought from Markits as part of much larger orders. The floors of railway modellers' workshops must be littered with tiny (but vital) bits which ping into oblivion! I also order crankpins/crankpin washers by the hundred, rather than in packs of six or eight. 

 

All-conquering RTR? Yes, and isn't the model railway scene the duller for it, with far too many identical items seen on layouts and in the media (both electronic and paper)? One could argue that LB has far too many Bachmann Mk.1s, though all have been modified/improved. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Don't worry Tony,

 

there is a vaccine for too many MK1's. I was inoculated many years ago and haven't looked back.

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21 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good afternoon again, Andy,

 

Did you put a one eight taper reamer through the driving wheel bearings after they were inserted? And, also, did you put that same reamer through the driven axle's bearings and the gearbox's bearings at the same time? 

 

It's my experience that one eighth bearings and one eighth axles produce a friction-fit without this procedure.

 

By inserting one eighth Peco fibre washers on the axles on the insulated side, the wheel rims won't touch the frames. If you're not sure where a short might be, wait until dark, then run the chassis at full voltage - you'll soon see where there are any shorts!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

What is not often mentioned - and can be the principal cause of wheels running excentrically and thereby touching the frames - is that the square hole in a Markits wheel will, nowadays, rarely accommodate the square end of the axle without the application of force.

 

The problem is casting flash or worn moulds, but the worst thing that you can do is to place the wheel on the axle as far as it will go - usually hardly at all - and then use the axle nut to 'pull' the wheel onto the axle. The usual outcome is that the axle will force its way into the wheel; not properly quartered and eccentric to the axle centreline.

 

My practice with these wheels nowadays is to, extremely carefully and using a square, rat-tail need file, open the square hole in the BACK of the wheel, until the wheel fits exactly onto the square end of the axle. It is vital that no metal is removed from the FRONT edges of the square hole in the wheel, or correct quartering will be lost.

 

What I do is to place the wheel onto the end of the square file from the back, and at an angle so that the filing only affects the back edge of the hole; this is repeated for each of the four back edges. Very little metal needs to be removed - just enough to remove the taper in the square hole.

 

It is a bit fiddly, but worth it in order to get true-running wheels. Of course, it would be better if the wheels fitted the axles as supplied !

 

John Isherwood.

 

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good afternoon Andy,

 

I haven't finished any of the kits in the boxes I pictured, but they've all been opened.

 

'(cue howls of anguish!).'

 

Indeed! 

 

How anyone can contemplate getting a loco chassis to run well without its being assembled on a jig of some description, I have no idea. Even where frames have screw-together, turned spacers (SEF, for instance), I'll still check everything for accuracy by using jig axles (Markits/LRM), adjusting as necessary. Your A5 chassis could be made rigid by employing jig axles.  

 

As mentioned with regard to the J17 of late, though all the etched spacers' tabs fitted perfectly into the etched frames' slots, after a couple of initial tack joints, it was clear I would end up with a parallelogram. Using a jig sorted the problem out. 

 

As for missing grubscrews - why not order spares? I have dozens, bought from Markits as part of much larger orders. The floors of railway modellers' workshops must be littered with tiny (but vital) bits which ping into oblivion! I also order crankpins/crankpin washers by the hundred, rather than in packs of six or eight. 

 

All-conquering RTR? Yes, and isn't the model railway scene the duller for it, with far too many identical items seen on layouts and in the media (both electronic and paper)? One could argue that LB has far too many Bachmann Mk.1s, though all have been modified/improved. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

With regard to the jib, I assumed that it wouldn’t be required for a compensated chassis. It’s all tab and slot and fits together very well, so not much chance to get things out of square. If I give up open compensation, then obviously I’d need something to keep it square while soldering it up. 

 

I have a box full of motors and gears, but the grub screws in there didn’t seem to fit. There doesn’t seem to be a standard size to keep as spares. Obviously if you major on DJH GB1s, then it would make sense!

 

I tried the taper reamer but because the top hat bearings float with the compensation, i had to do them before assembly and it wasn’t easy to get traction, so they only had a very light ream. I didn’t;’t do the gearbox, so will try that.

 

Thanks for all the comments. I now feel duty bound to bury my head in that wet towel and give it another go. I will report back in due course.

 

Regards

 

Andy

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

It's each to their own. Your WD runs exceptionally well, and if it's because of compensation, then that's good. 

Hi Tony. Thanks, but one correction: it's not compensated, it's sprung. But I agree, it's very much each to their own. As I've said before, we've all got our own methods. It's what works for you. I tend to use compensation more on 6-coupled. On 8-coupled I've used springing. I think the key to good running whether rigid or compensated/sprung is setting up the chassis with a jig using the coupling rods to ensure accuracy. That, and making sure the axles run freely in their bearings and coupling rods not overnight - or the opposite, over sloppy, particularly fore and aft.  It takes quite a long time from being fairly inexperienced in building locos to then learn and develop and finally focus on your own individual approach and, of course, you learn the biggest lessons by your mistakes. I'm still very much at the learning stage. (...and enjoying it... with one or two moments otherwise ;-)  )

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22 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

With regard to the jib, I assumed that it wouldn’t be required for a compensated chassis. It’s all tab and slot and fits together very well, so not much chance to get things out of square. If I give up open compensation, then obviously I’d need something to keep it square while soldering it up. 

Hi Andy, a compensated chassis, with horn blocks set up from the coupling rods, would allow acceptable running in a chassis out of square (although you wouldn't want it). However, to achieve a square chassis you need to use something like a set of Comet jigs ( I think they are still available) which you can get at Wizard models.

 

For the setting up of horn blocks, I mainly use an old set of perseverance coupling rod jigs for Gibson/Ultrascale wheels and I've got another set of pointy ones that will set them up for Markits wheels. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

What is not often mentioned - and can be the principal cause of wheels running excentrically and thereby touching the frames - is that the square hole in a Markits wheel will, nowadays, rarely accommodate the square end of the axle without the application of force.

 

The problem is casting flash or worn moulds, but the worst thing that you can do is to place the wheel on the axle as far as it will go - usually hardly at all - and then use the axle nut to 'pull' the wheel onto the axle. The usual outcome is that the axle will force its way into the wheel; not properly quartered and eccentric to the axle centreline.

 

My practice with these wheels nowadays is to, extremely carefully and using a square, rat-tail need file, open the square hole in the BACK of the wheel, until the wheel fits exactly onto the square end of the axle. It is vital that no metal is removed from the FRONT edges of the square hole in the wheel, or correct quartering will be lost.

 

What I do is to place the wheel onto the end of the square file from the back, and at an angle so that the filing only affects the back edge of the hole; this is repeated for each of the four back edges. Very little metal needs to be removed - just enough to remove the taper in the square hole.

 

It is a bit fiddly, but worth it in order to get true-running wheels. Of course, it would be better if the wheels fitted the axles as supplied !

 

John Isherwood.

 

Good afternoon John,

 

I'm slightly puzzled by your findings. 

 

Which specific Markits drivers are you having difficulty with? Since Christmas, I've fitted 18 26mm Markits drivers, 18 19mm Markits drivers and six 21mm Markits drivers. Last year, I built some 20 locos, all shod with Markits drivers and found no difficulties. 

 

If ever I've had a too tight fit (very, very rarely), I run a Swann Morton curved blade at 90 degrees to the square hole in the wheel in a fine scraping motion. This removes any burr, but does not alter the square's accuracy at all. 

 

Another dodge to ease fitting is to VERY, VERY carefully take a fine file and just dress the extreme ends of the squares on the axles. This will not affect the quartering, but gives a slight 'lead' for the axle to be inserted.

 

Yet another dodge (and Mark Arscott will be horrified if he reads this) for getting the axles through the bearings and the gearbox's bearings with ease is to slightly file the extreme edge of the axle being inserted. On occasions, I'll find the axle just won't go through without this very minor alteration. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

Edited by Tony Wright
to clarify a point
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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

 

With regard to the jib, I assumed that it wouldn’t be required for a compensated chassis. It’s all tab and slot and fits together very well, so not much chance to get things out of square. If I give up open compensation, then obviously I’d need something to keep it square while soldering it up. 

 

I have a box full of motors and gears, but the grub screws in there didn’t seem to fit. There doesn’t seem to be a standard size to keep as spares. Obviously if you major on DJH GB1s, then it would make sense!

 

I tried the taper reamer but because the top hat bearings float with the compensation, i had to do them before assembly and it wasn’t easy to get traction, so they only had a very light ream. I didn’t;’t do the gearbox, so will try that.

 

Thanks for all the comments. I now feel duty bound to bury my head in that wet towel and give it another go. I will report back in due course.

 

Regards

 

Andy

Persevere my friend, persevere.......

 

Regarding grubscrews, the ones I have fit all Romfords worms/gearwheels, and every 'box made by DJH. If anything, the DJH ones are a tiny bit short. They'll also fit Comet's 'boxes - Markits make the worms/gearwheels for these. 

 

If you ream the gearbox, it's important that it's done in situ - in the frames. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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3 hours ago, Headstock said:

 

Don't worry Tony,

 

there is a vaccine for too many MK1's. I was inoculated many years ago and haven't looked back.

I thought 1951 (when the Mk.1s were introduced) was too late for your modelling period, Andrew.

 

I admit there are over 100 Bachmann Mk.1s on LB - that's an awful lot of roof ribs to remove! With the nasty ribs gone, wheels changed, couplings altered and concertina gangways fitted, plus some weathering, they really look the part. The time spent in altering them is well-spent in my view; it's a fraction of what it would have taken me to build so many. I just make the types not made RTR.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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