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Tony Wright

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37 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

I'm slightly puzzled by your findings.

 

Just my invariable experience, Tony, of Markits wheels generally in recent years - both those bought from Wizard Models recently, and those bought some time ago and stored with the kit in question. I don't use them in the quantities that you do - but I've already fitted several sets this year.

 

Perhaps my practice and yours achieve the same end - that of easing the entry of the axle square end into the wheel. I assumed that the 'tightness' is due to some wear in the casting mould which produces a wheel with a square hole that is slightly tapered. It could be, as your practice suggests, that the 'tightness' is due to milling burrs on the axle end - either would produce the same experience.

 

Whilst talking of Markits wheels; I gather that these are now being produced with stainless steel tyres as opposed to nickel silver; not sure about my views on this - do you have any thoughts?

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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When desperate, I have been known to make my own grub screws. When your last one vanishes and you want to get on, you can look through your collection of steel bolts and find one that fits the thread. 12BA is the most common. Cut the bolt to length, cut a slot for the screwdriver with a piercing saw and you have a replacement. To hold it for cutting, put a few nuts on the bolt and you can grip it in a vice without causing any damage to the threads.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

I thought 1951 (when the Mk.1s were introduced) was too late for your modelling period, Andrew.

 

I admit there are over 100 Bachmann Mk.1s on LB - that's an awful lot of roof ribs to remove! With the nasty ribs gone, wheels changed, couplings altered and concertina gangways fitted, plus some weathering, they really look the part. The time spent in altering them is well-spent in my view; it's a fraction of what it would have taken me to build so many. I just make the types not made RTR.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Indeed Tony,

 

the 1951 cut off vaccine has reduced the R number and the spread of the MK1 virus to below zero. Such symptoms as shopping, filing roof ribs and despairing at moulded grab handles are a thing of the past, it even stops you building them. Occasionally, I have been known to time travel past the KT boundary, I may post an image but don't tell anybody else on the thread.

 

P.S. It's also proof against some forms of 16 ton mineral wagons and the spread of cupboard door vans.

 

Edited by Headstock
clarify a point
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4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

 

How anyone can contemplate getting a loco chassis to run well without its being assembled on a jig of some description, I have no idea. Even where frames have screw-together, turned spacers (SEF, for instance), I'll still check everything for accuracy by using jig axles (Markits/LRM), adjusting as necessary. Your A5 chassis could be made rigid by employing jig axles. 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

   

Must have done something  wrong. All my early  scratchbuilt models were built without any newfangled jigs, but this  was  fifty years ago.  A chassis were built from half inch brass channel all of  1/16" thick.  My drill was a hand-drill clamped  to a board . The chassis was carefully marked the drilled by pushing  the chassis with a block of 3"X4" timber with the left hand whilst turning the drill with the right. Once the first side of the channel had been  drilled it was carefully aligned before continuing to drill the second side. Coupling rods marked and drilled undersized then adjusted to fit.

 

In defence of such crudity I always succeeded in getting them to run well.

 

Yes, times have changed.  I now use jig(Eileen's)  but all my recent modelling is compensated and  in P4 which requires a bit more sophistication.

 

ArthurK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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59 minutes ago, BurscoughCurves said:

 

The main one would be the progress on the last major scenic area of my layout Halifax Powell Street; a what-might have been former LNWR secondary main line terminus in Halifax. This is my first 'proper' layout, located in a small spare bedroom. Having been inspired by many fantastic images of the region (all satanic mills and retaining walls!) I have disguised the exit to FY with some significant feeling mill buildings, and short rows of terraced housing naturally! I have really enjoyed architectural scratch building.

 

_1_Scenics.PNG.0ebf2b93610596021e371154dd5592c3.PNG

 

 

 

 

Love the tyre marks in the muddy track. Great observation and modelling.

 

 

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1 hour ago, BurscoughCurves said:

 

Hi Tony,

 

I hope you are well.

 

Having browsed your thread with interest for a long while now, this is my first contribution. We chatted some years ago at the Wigan show, and discussed a good place to start with kit building (a SE Finecast 4F was recommended). It was, and still is my intention to start kit building locos and stock after the scenic side of my layout is at a more complete stage. I feel I am almost at that point!

 

Regarding the increase in hobby time in light of the current situation, I certainly have made far more progress than I would have during normality. Although I have been working from home as best as I can during this period, I have ticked off several projects, big (ish) and small.

 

The main one would be the progress on the last major scenic area of my layout Halifax Powell Street; a what-might have been former LNWR secondary main line terminus in Halifax. This is my first 'proper' layout, located in a small spare bedroom. Having been inspired by many fantastic images of the region (all satanic mills and retaining walls!) I have disguised the exit to FY with some significant feeling mill buildings, and short rows of terraced housing naturally! I have really enjoyed architectural scratch building.

 

_1_Scenics.PNG.0ebf2b93610596021e371154dd5592c3.PNG

 

Please forgive the quality of the images, I only have a smartphone available to me at the moment.

 

The second project was to replace the over-scale looking smoke deflectors on my Hornby Britannia, changing her identity and giving her a medium weathered finish. I used etched brass deflectors from Silver Tay models, with the midland style hand cut-outs correct for the new identity of 70054 Dornoch Firth at the time modelled. It is my first venture into loco detailing and re-numbering, and definitely improves the look of the model I believe.

 

_2_Brit.PNG.5299c1b1d6cae9b1f8aa51952629f627.PNG

 

I have also used the time to set up a temporary spray booth on the work bench and have become more confident in the use of an airbrush. I have made decent headway into changing emblems where applicable (Modelmaster waterslides) and weathering the fleet. Several more locos and plenty of items of stock to go yet.

 

_3_Weathering.PNG.eb23474e811245a95d65937db43d04ab.PNG

 

 The hobby brings so much pleasure to me and has been essential to my mental wellbeing during the lockdown. It has always been the perfect antidote my day job which I do enjoy, but can find stressful at times.

 

Finally- I'd would like to add how much I admire your layouts and approach to modelling. I can't remember what year it was but it must have been in the early 2000's when at the Manchester show I remember seeing Stoke Summit and it being the first time I saw a familiar model from the magazines 'in the flesh'. I was rather star-struck!  

 

Best regards,

Pete

 

Hi 

 

Some fantastic examples of weathering, the best I have seen in a long time.

 

Regards

 

David

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17 hours ago, DougN said:

Thanks for the pickup photos Tony. As most know  have been building the V2's, yesterday I sat down to build my most hated item on the chassis..... the brake gear,  as I always manage to get it to work perfectly every time.... ie the loco is stopped dead by it! So I am being extremely careful. (I can hear murmurings from the back of he "started with pickups") I think the photo below perfectly sums up the great design by Martin Finney.... but what about the room for the pickups! IMG_0829.JPG.d96efb83913aa76ba662fdc0d9c6533f.JPG

 

yes there is pull rods that go back on themselves leaving precious little space for pickups let alone space to get some copper clad to mount them on! 

Hi Doug,

You are a man after my own heart. I too like to build the underside of my models to match the level of detail on top.  But as you have discovered this introduces new challenges when it comes to pick ups.

 

Given your situation you might consider an alternate approach to fitting wiper pickups that removes them from the underside of the model.  There are several methods I have seen over the years but the method I have used the most is illustrated in the following diagram. 

 

image.png.c658102021a25ccc41d8726f832e97fa.png

I use phosphor bronze strip but I expect Nickel Silver would be just as good.  The pickup is soldered to the copper clad which itself is firmly glued  to the top edge of the inside face of the frame.  

 

There are two things to watch out for with this approach.  The first is that the curve at the top of the spring mustn't be so tight as to allow it to touch the top of the frame.  The other thing to ensure is that the spring doesn't short against the underside of the footplate but this is unlikely to be a problem with a OO chassis.

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

 

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2 hours ago, BurscoughCurves said:

 

Hi Tony,

 

I hope you are well.

 

Having browsed your thread with interest for a long while now, this is my first contribution. We chatted some years ago at the Wigan show, and discussed a good place to start with kit building (a SE Finecast 4F was recommended). It was, and still is my intention to start kit building locos and stock after the scenic side of my layout is at a more complete stage. I feel I am almost at that point!

 

Regarding the increase in hobby time in light of the current situation, I certainly have made far more progress than I would have during normality. Although I have been working from home as best as I can during this period, I have ticked off several projects, big (ish) and small.

 

The main one would be the progress on the last major scenic area of my layout Halifax Powell Street; a what-might have been former LNWR secondary main line terminus in Halifax. This is my first 'proper' layout, located in a small spare bedroom. Having been inspired by many fantastic images of the region (all satanic mills and retaining walls!) I have disguised the exit to FY with some significant feeling mill buildings, and short rows of terraced housing naturally! I have really enjoyed architectural scratch building.

 

_1_Scenics.PNG.0ebf2b93610596021e371154dd5592c3.PNG

 

Please forgive the quality of the images, I only have a smartphone available to me at the moment.

 

The second project was to replace the over-scale looking smoke deflectors on my Hornby Britannia, changing her identity and giving her a medium weathered finish. I used etched brass deflectors from Silver Tay models, with the midland style hand cut-outs correct for the new identity of 70054 Dornoch Firth at the time modelled. It is my first venture into loco detailing and re-numbering, and definitely improves the look of the model I believe.

 

_2_Brit.PNG.5299c1b1d6cae9b1f8aa51952629f627.PNG

 

I have also used the time to set up a temporary spray booth on the work bench and have become more confident in the use of an airbrush. I have made decent headway into changing emblems where applicable (Modelmaster waterslides) and weathering the fleet. Several more locos and plenty of items of stock to go yet.

 

_3_Weathering.PNG.eb23474e811245a95d65937db43d04ab.PNG

 

 The hobby brings so much pleasure to me and has been essential to my mental wellbeing during the lockdown. It has always been the perfect antidote my day job which I do enjoy, but can find stressful at times.

 

Finally- I'd would like to add how much I admire your layouts and approach to modelling. I can't remember what year it was but it must have been in the early 2000's when at the Manchester show I remember seeing Stoke Summit and it being the first time I saw a familiar model from the magazines 'in the flesh'. I was rather star-struck!  

 

Best regards,

Pete

 

I'm very well, thank you.

 

This is beautiful modelling, Pete,

 

Thanks for showing us. 

 

70054 seems to be popular Brit choice. I saw it at Retford in the late-'50s on an express freight - very, very rare; obviously borrowed from Leeds.

 

I made a model of it by using a Hornby tender-drive ANZAC, chucking the tender drive away and substituting sets of Comet frames. I used Jackson Evans' smoke deflectors, but retained the handrails. Renumbering/renaming/weathering completed it. I also replaced the rather chunky original chimney - really well worth doing on Hornby Brits. 

 

997020879_HornbyBritannia70054.jpg.f6661fe9493b043b15b3388e6fdcb1b2.jpg

 

70054.jpg.fcdbf275b550d0d35ff39d01cb9bc100.jpg

 

I used it for a time on Little Bytham, but it rarely saw the light of day.

 

535848618_7005401.jpg.2c26bf7f54df3a232129d80d550b1258.jpg

 

2036419267_7005402.jpg.42e281a9f7a18c8405a94b0f9d8f0e7c.jpg

 

1085558083_7005403.jpg.8277ee6b7105ca27a7ee2d56fe76f7ee.jpg

 

It now sees regular use on Shap (or did before shows were cancelled), where it's really more-appropriate. . 

 

A decent enough layout loco, I think.

 

Please keep on showing us what you're doing. Personal modelling at its best.........

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

Just my invariable experience, Tony, of Markits wheels generally in recent years - both those bought from Wizard Models recently, and those bought some time ago and stored with the kit in question. I don't use them in the quantities that you do - but I've already fitted several sets this year.

 

Perhaps my practice and yours achieve the same end - that of easing the entry of the axle square end into the wheel. I assumed that the 'tightness' is due to some wear in the casting mould which produces a wheel with a square hole that is slightly tapered. It could be, as your practice suggests, that the 'tightness' is due to milling burrs on the axle end - either would produce the same experience.

 

Whilst talking of Markits wheels; I gather that these are now being produced with stainless steel tyres as opposed to nickel silver; not sure about my views on this - do you have any thoughts?

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

Good evening John,

 

I have a couple of sets of the latest Markits stainless steel-tyred drivers. However, I've yet to use them. When I do, I'll report accordingly.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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On 18/05/2020 at 16:03, zr2498 said:

There are truss bridge photographs available looking from the outside but views looking along the deck of such a bridge are in short supply. If anyone has some info to help it would be appreciated.

 

Hi Dave

 

I came across this route learning video for Grosmont to Battersea Junction on YouTube. See 12 mins 56 secs. I knew there was a bridge like that on the line. Hope this helps solve your question.

 

Best Regards

 

John 

 

 

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On 22/05/2020 at 15:42, thegreenhowards said:

Tony,

 

I’m in awe! I thought I was doing reasonably well with my A5 kit, but it still doesn’t work well and needs more fettling, so is in the ‘too difficult’ pile for the moment. I find that bit of a kit build the most frustrating and worrying.

 

I seem to be busier than ever now with the house full of kids and wife whereas I normally have it to myself. And the allotment needs watering and weeding regularly  - I might need those spuds when the country runs out of food!

 

However as well as the A5, I have managed to get some ballasting done on Gresley Jn which was well overdue, so progress is being made - just much slower than yours! 


Andy

 

Don't know what the problem is but For information when I built my A5 years ago, a Craftsman kit I think, I had all kinds of problems with the front bogie shorting out.   Even running in the dark didn't find one where the front was just catching the buffer where it protuded through the buffer beam.  The 'flash' was under the frame and since it was very small was hidden.   It took me a long time to get it all sorted because it would run OK for a while then some particular configuration caused it to short again.  The back bogie was also a bit of a pain.

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Posted (edited)
On 22/05/2020 at 15:42, thegreenhowards said:

Tony,

 

I’m in awe! I thought I was doing reasonably well with my A5 kit, but it still doesn’t work well and needs more fettling, so is in the ‘too difficult’ pile for the moment. I find that bit of a kit build the most frustrating and worrying.

 

I seem to be busier than ever now with the house full of kids and wife whereas I normally have it to myself. And the allotment needs watering and weeding regularly  - I might need those spuds when the country runs out of food!

 

However as well as the A5, I have managed to get some ballasting done on Gresley Jn which was well overdue, so progress is being made - just much slower than yours! 


Andy

 

Don't know what the problem is but For information when I built my A5 years ago, a Craftsman kit I think, I had all kinds of problems with the front bogie shorting out.   Even running in the dark didn't find one where the front was just catching the buffer where it protruded through the buffer beam.  The 'flash' was under the frame and since it was very small was hidden.   It took me a long time to get it all sorted because it would run OK for a while then some particular configuration caused it to short again.  The back bogie was also a bit of a pain.

Edited by Theakerr
Somehow duplicated but cannot figure out how to delete

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Now that I know the problem and that you are using plunger pick-ups I have a couple of thoughts.  I like plunger pick-ups but they can be a bit tricky to set up.  First the 'tail' and or the wire soldered to the 'tail' can come into contact with any number of bits inside the frame.  Depending on how you have set them up they can rotate slightly and catch.  Also depending on how your motor is fixed it may move slightly depending on direction causing the tail and it wire to move.  Finally, if your wheels are not true either because of the problem mentioned about the square ends or because the bushings are slightly out of alignment the plunger moves in and out and tends to rotate just enough to cause aforementioned contact.   Finally, you need to make sure that all plungers are in contact with the metal tire especially if you only have pick-ups on one side.  What happens is that the wheels rotate the connecting rods can push or pull the wheels away from the plunger head.  This effect can be amplified if the spacing washers are not set up to the correct thickness.

 

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3 minutes ago, Theakerr said:

 I like plunger pick-ups but they can be a bit tricky to set up.

 

I like the idea of plunger pick-ups but - having tried them - I wouldn't go near them again for love nor money ! :ireful:

 

John Isherwood.

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2 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

 

I like the idea of plunger pick-ups but - having tried them - I wouldn't go near them again for love nor money ! :ireful:

 

John Isherwood.

I thought plunger pick-ups were a good idea, John,

 

Until I tried them.

 

Never again! They stuck, and for absolute adjustment the wheels had to be taken off too many times.

 

Now, I avoid them like the plague......

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Re: 8Fs.

Don't you mean O6s?

Ah but of course your railway is set after 1947.

Never mind; nobody's perfect.

 

Despite being a determined NER/NEA partisan I do like the Stanier era 8Fs. I think one of the best looking LMS locomotives.

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Here are a couple more O6's, the 1968 view is my own taking, and incidentally the "Last Real" steam hauled train I saw.

KITTYBREWESTER  O6 3141, 9 June 1946.jpg

O6 48715 1 Aug 1968.jpg

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8 hours ago, Chamby said:

The extra modelling time for me during lockdown has been a little different.  Over the winter months, I have been finishing off a garage conversion that was originally intended to be a railway room, but has now become my wife’s painting studio.  The upside of this is that our previously shared hobby room is now mine exclusively, so I have been very much focused on expanding into her former workspace over the last few weeks.  

 

First up was a widening of the layout to allow the end curves to be eased with a transition curve of 48” leading to a minimum radius of 36” rather than the tight 24” previously used.  So... extending the baseboards, lifting the old track, laying, painting and ballasting the new, re-wiring both track and the repositioned baseboard joins, what sounds a simple task has taken quite a while.

 

74D9946D-9960-4297-904B-0DDCCAB9B4C6.jpeg.ca3276430f54a55756812bbf03be06c2.jpeg

 

Since then, I took a dislike to the billiard table smooth baseboard tops, so have attacked them with a multi-tool to create a low embankment that will both improve the scenic profile and give better photographic opportunities as the scenic side of things progress.  Apologies for posting the later-than-usual-epoch locomotive and stock, it is intended for a club layout but is what was running at the time.

 

2FEEA035-8CD5-467C-A385-E279EACE00AC.jpeg.6da68c17cf60132c95b80ecec2da92da.jpeg

 

Another outcome of the ‘studio’ arrangement is that a part of the garage conversion will become a modelling workbench with sufficient space for a permanently set up spray booth and DCC programming station.  So so it’s been way more DIY than modelling work for me, but very much driven by the hobby opportunities to come.

 

405A16CC-85F4-453E-852B-0385A88D6F3B.jpeg

Time for a layout thread Phil? Please?

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2 hours ago, micknich2003 said:

Here are a couple more O6's, the 1968 view is my own taking, and incidentally the "Last Real" steam hauled train I saw.

 

 

I bet the LNER O6's were faster than the LMS 8F's.

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12 hours ago, Chamby said:

The extra modelling time for me during lockdown has been a little different.  Over the winter months, I have been finishing off a garage conversion that was originally intended to be a railway room, but has now become my wife’s painting studio.  The upside of this is that our previously shared hobby room is now mine exclusively, so I have been very much focused on expanding into her former workspace over the last few weeks.  

 

First up was a widening of the layout to allow the end curves to be eased with a transition curve of 48” leading to a minimum radius of 36” rather than the tight 24” previously used.  So... extending the baseboards, lifting the old track, laying, painting and ballasting the new, re-wiring both track and the repositioned baseboard joins, what sounds a simple task has taken quite a while.

 

74D9946D-9960-4297-904B-0DDCCAB9B4C6.jpeg.ca3276430f54a55756812bbf03be06c2.jpeg

 

Since then, I took a dislike to the billiard table smooth baseboard tops, so have attacked them with a multi-tool to create a low embankment that will both improve the scenic profile and give better photographic opportunities as the scenic side of things progress.  Apologies for posting the later-than-usual-epoch locomotive and stock, it is intended for a club layout but is what was running at the time.

 

2FEEA035-8CD5-467C-A385-E279EACE00AC.jpeg.6da68c17cf60132c95b80ecec2da92da.jpeg

 

Another outcome of the ‘studio’ arrangement is that a part of the garage conversion will become a modelling workbench with sufficient space for a permanently set up spray booth and DCC programming station.  So so it’s been way more DIY than modelling work for me, but very much driven by the hobby opportunities to come.

 

405A16CC-85F4-453E-852B-0385A88D6F3B.jpeg

Wow excellent work! I’ve had the time during lockdown to convert my garage too, from a damp and cold junk room to a nice, cosy and draught free railway room. Also had the chance to extend my layout and ease my curves. 

5EB93D39-D733-4AA4-9B1B-0CB04B4AB7E4.jpeg.60b4eb6923fcc7c7b024761996fd4446.jpeg

That’s as it was a few weeks ago. 
 

Chris

 

 

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On 22/05/2020 at 00:02, Woodcock29 said:

Graham

This model of what I presume is an etched brass Dia 148 raises an interesting question. There are two gas lamps over the toilets which seems logical as there were two separate toilets but no ventilators. My model of Dia 148 shown on the previous page and now here again (but not in this quote) for comparison has only one gas lamp and two ventilators as printed on the roof by Bill.  This doesn't really make sense to me as the single gas lamp flue is actually over the dividing wall between the toilets. I wonder if someone can provide any enlightenment as I've yet to find a photo of a real one?

 

Andrew

Further to my comments above re positioning of gas lamps/ventilators over centrally located toilets in GN Howlden stock I remembered to have a look at the 3-D printed 6-wheelers by MIke Trice on Shapeways. The Dia 84 first  roof has three holes across the centre line of the coach suggesting the same arrangement of fittings as Bill Bedford has on his Dia 148. So I'm still confused as to how this arrangement might work in reality?

 

Andrew 

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8 hours ago, micknich2003 said:

Here's a O6.

O6 3506. Doncaster..jpg

Thanks Mick,

 

Isn't it often the case, if a prototype is slavishly-followed, the end result, in model form, might well look wrong?

 

Whenever I apply transfers, I take great care making sure that they're centred in both horizontal and vertical positions. Not needed on this tender!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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