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Tony Wright

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An A5 was the Station Pilot for a time at Grimsby and I had 'cabbed' it when it took out the local Grimsby to Louth pick-up, so it was a natural to build for me.  Yes they were a handsome locomotive

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

That's a very natural-looking A5, Clem,

 

I'm not surprised you're fond of it. 

 

I think they're a very elegant prototype - as handsome a Pacific tank as ever ran in this country.

 

Strange, isn't it, when Robinson turned the wheel arrangement round, it resulted in the only ugly engine he ever designed?

 

My sightings of the ex-GC big tanks were at Manchester London Road, towards the ends of the lives.

 

1048202472_A569814Grantham21_08.602251.jpg.e2ff5011f9c038c6d5f828dc95a0e6c3.jpg

 

I can certainly justify an A5 (or two) on LB, because a few were shedded at Grantham in the late-'50s. 

 

1835884693_A569832DarlingtonShed24_04.5543H83.jpg.fb2b7a1c4c123a332d7a8b9dfffa7586.jpg

 

 

The later build ones were longer and some had round buffers on the front. 

 

Because the cabs were lower, the spectacles were of a different shape. And the oval buffers were of a different pattern to the originals. 

307626679_DB1557.69842DarlingtonWorks.jpg.9352a91413b8b92b4c75834051e619bf.jpg

1666547558_43H.8.5-69834StocktonShed24_04_55.jpg.332b0c2736217fb491d54853fc6b2f2c.jpg

 

The vacuum standpipe was on the opposite side. Oh, those joys of loco-picking! 

 

Though the GC Pacific tanks were very good-looking, I'm not sure that could be said of the ex-NER A7s.

 

1668065454_A769783-SpringheadShed24_07.55small.jpg.65baae7fe6c5da83cb6123dd1e319baa.jpg

 

It would be interesting replicating the creases in this one!

 

Please (all) observe copyright restrictions. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good evening Tony. I'm very much with you on elegance of the A5s and just wish one had been preserved. The A5/2s were not the only ones with round buffers at the front:

 

69809_001.jpg.8aa9d946968848aabe43f91b459118ee.jpg

69809 entering Grantham. Note the Diagram 246 Brake third next to the engine and the Thompson Lavatory Comp behind. I've got an isinglass 3-D kit for one of the D246s but I just can't see how I can get the glazing looking OK so I'll be looking to cut and shut a couple of Kirks where I'll be able to flush glaze it, more realistically. So many blooming projects to do! Thinking of this is the nearest I get to feeling pressure in lockdown! :-)

 

I quite like the A7s which I believe were a 3 cylinder freight engine.

 

Oh, and like you I have a fear of heights. It's dogged me all my life and even cost me a day's train-spotting at Crewe in January 1959, But that's another story.

Edited by Clem
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A few pages back was a brief discussion about cheap versus expensive paint brushes, which I've just read.

 

I best paint brushes I've ever found are the Winsor and Newton Series 7 Finest Sable.  They are very expensive.  A set of sizes 5, 6 and 7 will cost you over £140.  However, there is nothing like them for bodywork jobs that you can't (or in my case choose not to) use an airbrush.  They keep their shape and last forever - I still have some over 20 years old and although their point isn't as sharp as it once was they are still fine for a proper, careful job, so all that time cleaning them as soon as they were done wasn't wasted.  They are not something to be bought online because not every Series 7 brush has a prefect point and you can sort out  good one. 

 

However, I would never use a series 7 for weathering, or let one near acrylic paint.  There are a lot of decent cheap brushes around, and after a lifetime of brush-cherishing I am getting used to the idea of throwaways. For everyday use I've found the Hornby brushes with the orange orthopedic handles to give good results and last a reasonable. For the more brutal techniques such as drybrushing, stippling, textured paint, and sloshing acrylic washes around  I have started using really cheapo brushes from the local craft shop and online.  Some have turned into miniature chimney sweep brushes the moment the pain pot was opened, but often they are surprisingly resilient - and if you have to chuck one in the bin and reach for another then they really are very cheap. 

 

How have others adapted to the changing times for painting?

 

Tone

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Theakerr said:

Tony, out of curiosity can you remember what type you were using?  Providing care is taken to locate them at the correct radial position I find they don't need any further set up now I know what to do .   If my memory is correct mine were Allan Gibson - I hope memory is correct because if I have a go at a C12 or J6 this winter i will need some more.   On my first loco build (a Little Engines J11) I had planned to use the same method you use but this was some 30 years ago and I couldn't locate any small amounts of 'springy' wire in Canada and then  I saw the plunger pick-ups in a Magazine article.

I think mine were Alan Gibson ones.

 

I found drilling holes in the frames to locate them a fag, and I could never get the springing right. Maybe I was just prejudiced and not prepared to persevere.

 

As I've shown, I just use .45mm nickel silver now.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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2 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

Evening Tony, et al

 

It's finished!

 

DSC09948.JPG.9b1e64d3cb8605c43c2864a963ca3038.JPG

 

In the end it took me 35 days, mainly a couple of hours each evening, so I've only equalled my previous record. I'll never be a quick builder ...

 

DSC09955.JPG.752a313ffdb5f211ef1ff2d6067c4cda.JPG

 

Looking a bit lost over Shap (although a small batch of them did work the Stainmore route in the 1930s for a few years out of Kirkby Stephen shed)

 

Full story on the Grantham thread, including some video of the above train in motion.

 

Now - what shall I build next?

 

(great to see everyone else's efforts. I must go back over the last 24 hours and start clicking the 'like' button)

Looking good, Graham,

 

I assume you fit the handrails after painting? They should really be body-colour.

 

I always fit mine before painting. That way they can be securely soldered in place.

 

So, about 70 hours for you to finish it? Time well spent, but too long for me. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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I bought a previously built loco from Tony a while ago, A NuCast A5

1574107258_A5bought.JPG.f22f4c00c5376e6ad0dfbcb0dfeb4a3f.JPG

 

I have now repainted it into BR Lined black, it has some new frames above the front pony truck.

 

The NER 4-6-2T loco (A6 and A7) are very different by comparison..

1136705330_LittleEnginesA669783(1280x401).jpg.6fc356944ab005d25c0a726e10cde137.jpg

A Little Engines kit, this one has home made plunger pickups which work very well.

 

of course the Great Central did produce the 2-6-4T as well as the A5.

 

 

225088875_ZeppelinGCL1(1280x396).jpg.df13896d402631a4f1fc952b1283da75.jpg

A Zeppelin - scratchbuilt by my late father from Brass sheet. It has a MG Sharp gearbox with a D13 driving that through a neoprene tube,,,

 

None of these use Nickel Silver pick ups.. these are antiques Tony!  Phosphor Bronze wire has been available for a long time, it is more "springy" than Nickel Silver and acts a a self lubricant. (quoted from an engineering materials web site " These alloys are notable for their toughness, strength, low coefficient of friction, and fine grain". I keep hearing squeaks from the few Nickel Silver pick up fitted locos I have. These will be changed this week.

 

Baz

 

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Hello Tony

 

You have asked to see what people have been doing during the lockdown.

 

Well I have hit modellers block and done nothing. Hey Ho, such is life.

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The L1 looks really good Baz. What a beast!

 

Best wishes,

 

Alastair

 

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I haven't done much modelling recently.  A month ago I was volunteering six days a week with the London Ambulance Service - this is now down to one day a week.  During lockdown I have been working on the South Western Circle's photographic collections, from which I have selected an image of the most handsome Pacific tank in the country, Robert Urie's H16 class and known as the "Green Tanks".  The image is out of copyright, obviously, but please respect our ownership.

 

Bill

H16 516 c B.jpg

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15 minutes ago, Barry O said:

I bought a previously built loco from Tony a while ago, A NuCast A5

1574107258_A5bought.JPG.f22f4c00c5376e6ad0dfbcb0dfeb4a3f.JPG

 

I have now repainted it into BR Lined black, it has some new frames above the front pony truck.

 

The NER 4-6-2T loco (A6 and A7) are very different by comparison..

1136705330_LittleEnginesA669783(1280x401).jpg.6fc356944ab005d25c0a726e10cde137.jpg

A Little Engines kit, this one has home made plunger pickups which work very well.

 

of course the Great Central did produce the 2-6-4T as well as the A5.

 

 

225088875_ZeppelinGCL1(1280x396).jpg.df13896d402631a4f1fc952b1283da75.jpg

A Zeppelin - scratchbuilt by my late father from Brass sheet. It has a MG Sharp gearbox with a D13 driving that through a neoprene tube,,,

 

None of these use Nickel Silver pick ups.. these are antiques Tony!  Phosphor Bronze wire has been available for a long time, it is more "springy" than Nickel Silver and acts a a self lubricant. (quoted from an engineering materials web site " These alloys are notable for their toughness, strength, low coefficient of friction, and fine grain". I keep hearing squeaks from the few Nickel Silver pick up fitted locos I have. These will be changed this week.

 

Baz

 

 

The L1 is hardly an elegant design but just looks like a brute! I just love those old bullhead rail coupling rods. Proper "old school" and they don't look bad at all. The shape is actually not bad if you thin the wider web to match he other one and add some bosses and oilboxes. The curve from the fluted part to the webs is a better shape than many etches.

 

Several sources say the design is based on the LD&ECR 0-6-4T but with a pony truck to be kinder to the track and looking at that, I can see why they say that.

 

I have used phosphor bronze wire, nickel silver wire, even brass wire for pick ups (the brass works OK but wears very quickly) but recent locos have had Beryllium Copper, which is ultra springy. They all work! Somebody once told me that pick ups using similar materials are not as good as those using a different metal to the wheel tread. My technical knowledge stops there!  

 

I am not keen on plungers due to problems with ones sticking. Malcolm tried them on a few locos and regretted it. Anything but very fine wire would alter the way the spring worked and the constant movement caused a few solder joints to fracture and the wires fell off. They collect dirt on the plunger from the back of the wheel and it can jam them in or out. I have seen designs that allow removal from inside the frames without disturbing the wheels but unless you are really struggling to fit conventional pick ups I can't see any great advantages. So far, touch wood, I have always found a way to fit wipers.    

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Posted (edited)
On 23/05/2020 at 20:35, Fishplate said:

 

Hi Dave

 

I came across this route learning video for Grosmont to Battersea Junction on YouTube. See 12 mins 56 secs. I knew there was a bridge like that on the line. Hope this helps solve your question.

 

Best Regards

 

John 

 

 

 

I think you meant Battersby (N Yorks) not Battersea (S West London).

 

As for what I've been doing in lockdown my volunteering for the SLS is always by working from home so lockdown has had less impact than on some. I finished off production editing the new Internal Combustion Traction book (now out) and the regular Journal  & Newsletter plus some website updates.

 

spacer.png

 

As for my own modelling (or should it be bodging!) the shunting plank control panel has finally been wired in and my r-t-r Hornby Castle fixed so that the tender no longer regularly derails.

 

Edited by john new
Inserted the links.
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On 23/05/2020 at 17:58, Chamby said:

The extra modelling time for me during lockdown has been a little different.  Over the winter months, I have been finishing off a garage conversion that was originally intended to be a railway room, but has now become my wife’s painting studio.  The upside of this is that our previously shared hobby room is now mine exclusively, so I have been very much focused on expanding into her former workspace over the last few weeks.  

 

First up was a widening of the layout to allow the end curves to be eased with a transition curve of 48” leading to a minimum radius of 36” rather than the tight 24” previously used.  So... extending the baseboards, lifting the old track, laying, painting and ballasting the new, re-wiring both track and the repositioned baseboard joins, what sounds a simple task has taken quite a while.

 

 

 

Since then, I took a dislike to the billiard table smooth baseboard tops, so have attacked them with a multi-tool to create a low embankment that will both improve the scenic profile and give better photographic opportunities as the scenic side of things progress.  Apologies for posting the later-than-usual-epoch locomotive and stock, it is intended for a club layout but is what was running at the time.

 

 

 

Another outcome of the ‘studio’ arrangement is that a part of the garage conversion will become a modelling workbench with sufficient space for a permanently set up spray booth and DCC programming station.  So so it’s been way more DIY than modelling work for me, but very much driven by the hobby opportunities to come.

 

 

 

Good evening Chamby,

 

I don't think that I've seen your layout before. I very much like the sweep of it, what a difference your new curve makes.  I always like the look of an embankment that forms a near horizon against the sky. The M&GN on LB does that quite well. Your newly created embankment, reminds me a little of Staverton Road on the GC's London extension. That would make a dramatic 'watch the trains go by' setting for a layout in my opinion. I think you should keep cutting away and make it longer.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Clem said:

Good evening Tony. I'm very much with you on elegance of the A5s and just wish one had been preserved. The A5/2s were not the only ones with round buffers at the front:

 

69809_001.jpg.8aa9d946968848aabe43f91b459118ee.jpg

69809 entering Grantham. Note the Diagram 246 Brake third next to the engine and the Thompson Lavatory Comp behind. I've got an isinglass 3-D kit for one of the D246s but I just can't see how I can get the glazing looking OK so I'll be looking to cut and shut a couple of Kirks where I'll be able to flush glaze it, more realistically. So many blooming projects to do! Thinking of this is the nearest I get to feeling pressure in lockdown! :-)

 

I quite like the A7s which I believe were a 3 cylinder freight engine.

 

Oh, and like you I have a fear of heights. It's dogged me all my life and even cost me a day's train-spotting at Crewe in January 1959, But that's another story.

 

Good evening Clem,

 

I would be interested in your opinions on the Isinglass dia. 246, it sounds like you have the kit. The fact that you favour the Kirk is................interesting.

 

I Quite agree on the A7 and I don't see them as ugly at all. The A5 tanks, I'm not sure if elegant would be the word I would use. I see them as a big lovable bug that I must pursue.

 

I can't say that I have fear of heights, just falling off things.

 

Edited by Headstock
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Mm, LNER Pacific tanks. The A6 class were elegant, especially in their NER finery. The A7s were no-nonsense freight locomotives (one was fitted with a continuous braking system and tried on Newcastle to Consett via Ebchester passenger trains, but the experiment didn't last). The A8s were chunky looking rebuilds of the H1 4-4-4Ts, but lasted well and were successful. The A5s were purposeful in appearance, and again were successful and long lived.

 

In my opinion, of course :)

 

Mark

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On 24/05/2020 at 03:32, Chuffer Davies said:

Hi Doug,

You are a man after my own heart. I too like to build the underside of my models to match the level of detail on top.  But as you have discovered this introduces new challenges when it comes to pick ups.

 

Given your situation you might consider an alternate approach to fitting wiper pickups that removes them from the underside of the model.  There are several methods I have seen over the years but the method I have used the most is illustrated in the following diagram. 

 

image.png.c658102021a25ccc41d8726f832e97fa.png

I use phosphor bronze strip but I expect Nickel Silver would be just as good.  The pickup is soldered to the copper clad which itself is firmly glued  to the top edge of the inside face of the frame.  

 

There are two things to watch out for with this approach.  The first is that the curve at the top of the spring mustn't be so tight as to allow it to touch the top of the frame.  The other thing to ensure is that the spring doesn't short against the underside of the footplate but this is unlikely to be a problem with a OO chassis.

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

 

Have you considered just using the pony and tender wheels for pick up?

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Well JRG, I will let you see both chassis soon! (we are allowed 20 at home from Monday next week, so our meetings may start up again) the issue with up and overs is the splashers to the V2's which are over the top of the wheels. On the Scalefour list there is a photo of a black 5 with the same amount of trouble! So I will see where I can thread things through tonight....  After I have done loco Number 2.  Here is the state of play with the first V2 for brakes!  

IMG-20200524-WA0001.jpeg.1379ef28b006b5d68d725f94bd9291fe.jpeg

I am finding if there is problems I take a week or 2 to think them through and apply the solution.... hence the V2's have stayed stationary for about 4 weeks... (then again the work bench needed a really good tidy up... My riveter had disappeared (Ok found in the garage near to where I thought I had put it down) and My 10Ba tap had gone missing on the work bench... found hiding against one of the walls.... (I must remind my self to put it back in the tap container with my other one!)  

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Here's what I've been doing with quarantine modelling. I have continued with my "fine-scale" Thomas project (from a Bachmann Thomas), mainly painting the faces. I found that two coats of Vallejo Sky Grey to give really good coverage.

 

I have also been trying to work on his running plate. I figured out that the original running plate is 2mm too long, and the curve at the front is squished by around 1mm, which makes it look like the curve goes to far down vertically, although it doesn't. I set about trying to fix this by scratchbuilding a new running plate, but I cannot cut the curve properly. At all.

 

I have a few options:

1. Try to forget the difference with the curve and just shorten the Bachmann running plate by 2mm.

2. Shorten the running plate and attempt to scratchbuild just the curve.

3. Keep trying to scratchbuilt the complete running plate.

4. Buy a (slightly incorrect, but more correct overall) running plate from ShapeWays.

5. Try to just forget the error completely.

 

What do you guys think? I'll include a couple of pictures to show what I mean. I'm kind of leaning towards option 1 or 2.

 

If I do go with option two, does anyone have suggestions for how to cut a curve into plasticard? I've seen pictures that show people have done it, I just can't do it myself. Thanks!

 

Here are the pictures:

ThomasandGordon5.png

20200524_211711.jpg

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8 hours ago, Clem said:

I've got an isinglass 3-D kit for one of the D246s but I just can't see how I can get the glazing looking OK so I'll be looking to cut and shut a couple of Kirks where I'll be able to flush glaze it, more realistically.

 

Morning Clem,

 

I see Andrew has picked up on this interesting comment as well.  I'm working on one of his D274 BTL kits at the moment by way of trying them out and the glazing fits into a rebate at the back of the window so it's not as deeply recessed as a Kirk.  Ian Kirk himself has said that were he doing the range again he'd do the same.  You obviously don't flush glaze a wooden Gresley carriage, so do you mean that the glazing on the isinglass is not set back far enough or have you found another problem which I haven't yet reached?   I'm only just at the teaking stage with mine.

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6 hours ago, Headstock said:

I would be interested in your opinions on the Isinglass dia. 246, it sounds like you have the kit. The fact that you favour the Kirk is................interesting.

Good morning Andrew. Thanks for asking me that question as I've just got the Isinglass 3-D kit out again. I think I'll have a go at it next but I'll only use the sides and possibly the ends. To be honest, I'm not entirely sure how to approach it - what glue to use and the big question as mentioned in my previous post, how to glaze it. With Kirk coaches, I have a method, which though tedious, works very well with a reasonably good result. I suppose I may have to use a similar method using one of the glazing glues to try to achieve a similar result. The Kirk kits have a tapered lead in to the windows which allows a push fit, reinforced by the smallest smidgen of solvent (not enough to cause fogging).  I don't see myself using the kit's roof which comes in two sections (I'll use an MJT one) and for the under frame/bogies I may either a) use a Hornby donor or b) use an MJT floor with ABS bogies. The sides do need quite a bit of cleaning up, particularly some of the windows. To be honest, if etched sides were available, I'd have built a couple already such is the prevalence of this diagram on the Grantham-Nottingham-Derby line. Anyway, here's a photo of the parts, if it helps.

 

IMG_4834_rdcd.jpg.cc07c6a4cae3e8ed3ae787de42e2113d.jpg

 

 

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1 hour ago, jwealleans said:

 

Morning Clem,

 

I see Andrew has picked up on this interesting comment as well.  I'm working on one of his D274 BTL kits at the moment by way of trying them out and the glazing fits into a rebate at the back of the window so it's not as deeply recessed as a Kirk.  Ian Kirk himself has said that were he doing the range again he'd do the same.  You obviously don't flush glaze a wooden Gresley carriage, so do you mean that the glazing on the isinglass is not set back far enough or have you found another problem which I haven't yet reached?   I'm only just at the teaking stage with mine.

Morning Jonathan, Yes of course I don't strictly flush glaze Gresley teaks, it's just that I put the glazing in from the front and it does sit a little way back but closer to  flush compared to placing glazing the back, if that makes any sense - see D210 below. 

IMG_4835_rdcd.jpg.9a9edab357b7c9f98815b7143f290153.jpg

 

In my Isinglass kit, there doesn't seem to be a rebate of any useable nature at the back of the windows. (see below).

I wonder if he's improved the kits since I received this, some time ago. Can I also ask what glue you used to put the kit together with?

 

IMG_4836.jpg.6e8549be4e70cf00189ede4c4294acc0.jpg

 

Cheers, 

 

Clem.

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10 hours ago, Clem said:

Oh, and like you I have a fear of heights. It's dogged me all my life and even cost me a day's train-spotting at Crewe in January 1959, But that's another story.

 

Same here.  This took me a while to do:

 

IMG_0725.JPG.ff4d9f6e18b566cceade046e8e83789d.JPG

 

8 hours ago, t-b-g said:

I have used phosphor bronze wire, nickel silver wire, even brass wire for pick ups (the brass works OK but wears very quickly) but recent locos have had Beryllium Copper, which is ultra springy.

 

Nasty stuff, B-C.  Take care when working with it...

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Regarding Isinglass 3D-printed rolling stock kits, I've now built two items. 

 

The first was a GE section BTK 'shorty', given to me to assess. This must have been about four years ago; maybe more.

 

117841268_Isinglasscarriage10.jpg.fbf059b57f378dc14f27198c972c5256.jpg

 

It ended up with a most-pronounced bow!

 

I used superglue to put it together, and added MJT/Comet components to complete it.

 

920234969_Isinglasscarriage11.jpg.5f4f589efa7df916e402bc279640159e.jpg

 

1382809863_Isinglasscarriage12.jpg.f34614ff2ea7e17fe5ac32037a216653.jpg

 

Such was the 'roughness' of the finish, I used rattle can 'filler' primer to try to disguise this; without success! 

 

The roof was in two sections, and hiding the joint was very difficult. 

 

37259513_Isinglasscarriage13.jpg.6dd96ef673a77a13408f23254cf1ac93.jpg

 

I made no attempt to flush glaze it, resulting in a teak version of 'Bayonet'! 

 

1993642101_Isinglasscarriage14.jpg.5652d6bb821019a137b14575e27c11f6.jpg

 

Even as just a 'layout coach', it was unacceptable, so I gave it away to a friend. At least he could use the bogies and underframe in future.........

 

In fairness, the printing technique used by Andrew Edgson has improved an incredible amount in more recent times. 

 

The recent 'Pigeon Van' is much, much better in terms of the surface finish.

 

680294354_IsinglassPigeonVan14.jpg.532213bd53c97c21f05c5316c80450b8.jpg

 

How I built this is featured in the latest issue of BRM. 

 

The camera has cruelly revealed the patchy Pressfix loading data. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Clem said:

In my Isinglass kit, there doesn't seem to be a rebate of any useable nature at the back of the windows. (see below).

I wonder if he's improved the kits since I received this, some time ago. Can I also ask what glue you used to put the kit together with?

 

Blimey yes, mine is certainly ahead of that both in quality of print and design - there's a clear rebate behind each window (but not droplights or ends) to glaze into.   I have been taking pictures but I don't seem to have included the inside of the sides.  I'll try to do something today.

 

I superglued mine but all four corners needed some filling.  I've also used the central lavs to allow bracing pieces across the body which has helped it stay square and rigid.

 

spacer.png

Edited by jwealleans
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9 hours ago, bbishop said:

I haven't done much modelling recently.  A month ago I was volunteering six days a week with the London Ambulance Service - this is now down to one day a week.  During lockdown I have been working on the South Western Circle's photographic collections, from which I have selected an image of the most handsome Pacific tank in the country, Robert Urie's H16 class and known as the "Green Tanks".  The image is out of copyright, obviously, but please respect our ownership.

 

Bill

H16 516 c B.jpg

A massive tank, Bill,

 

I built a model of one some little time ago for a friend.......

 

1033701003_H1619.jpg.6ccc8d20237f9dfb287257e6a8b71f52.jpg

 

914479375_H1620.jpg.0ce476e339cdfc1a316671d152475633.jpg

 

An old Millholme kit - a bit chunky, but I think it captures something of these Feltham locos.

 

Geoff Haynes painted it.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, polybear said:

 

Same here.  This took me a while to do:

 

IMG_0725.JPG.ff4d9f6e18b566cceade046e8e83789d.JPG

 

 

For me it's not the fear of the height but the fear of hitting the ground should I fall. Nonetheless I've walked the glass floor on the Toronto CN tower, the Tokyo tower and Tower Bridge, and sat on the edge seats against the full height windows in the New York World Trade Centre (before it was destroyed by terrorists).

 

 

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