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Tony Wright

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7 hours ago, MJI said:

 

 

Don't get me started!

 

The Mark 1 was a quick fix, a decent modern old style vehicle easy to produce a lot of, the carriage version of the BR standards.

 

Swindon developed both the B4 bogie and unitary construction so the prototype Mark 2, a very different vehicle but not that advanced.

 

2DEF were the first proper advances for the passenger.

 

As to riding on a Mark 1 or Mark 2 _ABC depends entirely what is under the Mark 1. a 1 FO declassified as a SO on B4 is preferable to a 2B TSO, my rake of 2Bs has 2 1 FOs declassified one Commonwealth one B4, I rode in real life in the B4 one, was one of my favourite 47s as well.

 

Great post, that debunks the myth of the MK1 as some sort of super carriage. As you and others have noted, the ride is fine with decent bogies. However, as designed, they didn't have decent bogies. In fact, it took quite some time to get them.

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1 minute ago, Tony Wright said:

Two out of three, Andrew,

 

Well done!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Good evening Tony,

 

 I thought that I would leave number three for sir Greenie of the Howard's.

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Enough of MK1's

 

I've been away cleaning out my backlog of things to paint, another steel carrier. This time a Boplate-B, as seen up the M&GN earlier. It cost a little more than three quid, and I had to build it, but not a lot. I intended to photograph both sides, but forgot to turn it around.

BOPLATE B no1.jpg

BOPLATE B no2.jpg

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

The one signal not climbed recently to get an elevated view on LB was the Down slow starter. 

 

That has now been scaled.....................

 

892823489_elevatedview6000260858.jpg.9bc91b48eb44f6be2ebfa63772605af2.jpg

 

With this result....................

 

There are at least three reasons why this picture is time-anomalous, but it's my trainset.

The Vanwide (5th wagon along) over by the goods shed, it was built after the station had been demolished.

 

As already noted the Metro-Camm Pullmans. See above for why.

 

And the already stated Kylchap blastpipe/chimney on the V2, not done until after the buildings and platform were knocked down.

 

The LNER van in the siding next to the V2 looks a tad chubby compared to the other vans.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Headstock said:

 

Evening Tony,

 

I'll have a punt at MK1 Pullman's, smaller windows equals posher carriages, and the V2 with two holes in its smoke stack.  

Bytham was closed 59? Mk1 Pullmans 60/61 double pot V2 were fitted post 60…? Apologies only just saw that question has been answered.

Edited by davidw
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38 minutes ago, Headstock said:

Enough of MK1's

 

I've been away cleaning out my backlog of things to paint, another steel carrier. This time a Boplate-B, as seen up the M&GN earlier. It cost a little more than three quid, and I had to build it, but not a lot. I intended to photograph both sides, but forgot to turn it around.

 

 

You do get a wonderful finish on your models. Can I ask what paints you use? I assume you use an airbrush.

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2 hours ago, Denbridge said:

You can say the same for every CME. They guided the design teams and set the specifications. Always amuses me that for instance, Gresley designed his pacifics solely on his own drawing board as some people seem to think.

 

Yes, that's the point.  By the time you get to the elevated heights of CME  or Head of Carriage & Wagon (or the equivalent in practically any other job you can think of), your role is not to "do" it; it is to ensure it is properly "done", by your team, in the most appropriate, effective, and cost-effective way.  When things go well, yes you rightly get the credit.  When they go wrong though, you carry the can, even if you personally were nowhere near the smoking gun.  Therefore - where you're allowed to do so - you pick your senior team very carefully.

 

Which makes me wonder what it must have been like to be Edward Thompson, having to work with a bunch of people who made no great secret of the fact they'd rather someone else had got your job, didn't rate your ideas for how to develop and build new locomotives in the middle of a war with all the constraints that brought, and showed no great enthusiasm for solving the inevitable problems that resulted.  (Until after you'd gone of course ...).  Whatever the merits or demerits of his designs - or rather, his design concepts - it was surely something of a 'poisoned chalice'he inherited.

 

 

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F.W. Webb was certainly wholly responsible for such LNWR coaching issues as radial truck eight wheelers and the chain brake system.

 

Alan

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10 minutes ago, Willie Whizz said:

 

Yes, that's the point.  By the time you get to the elevated heights of CME  or Head of Carriage & Wagon (or the equivalent in practically any other job you can think of), your role is not to "do" it; it is to ensure it is properly "done", by your team, in the most appropriate, effective, and cost-effective way.  When things go well, yes you rightly get the credit.  When they go wrong though, you carry the can, even if you personally were nowhere near the smoking gun.  Therefore - where you're allowed to do so - you pick your senior team very carefully.

 

Which makes me wonder what it must have been like to be Edward Thompson, having to work with a bunch of people who made no great secret of the fact they'd rather someone else had got your job, didn't rate your ideas for how to develop and build new locomotives in the middle of a war with all the constraints that brought, and showed no great enthusiasm for solving the inevitable problems that resulted.  (Until after you'd gone of course ...).  Whatever the merits or demerits of his designs - or rather, his design concepts - it was surely something of a 'poisoned chalice'he inherited.

 

1st paragraph; I absolutely agree.

2nd paragraph; everything I have read about Thompson suggests he had none of the interpersonal skills to manage and more importantly, to LEAD a large team of people.  People will do things for a good Leader even though they might disagree with them.

I have worked for good Leaders who devolved authority to good Managers and also for some good Managers who would never have been good Leaders.

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14 minutes ago, MikeTrice said:

You do get a wonderful finish on your models. Can I ask what paints you use? I assume you use an airbrush.

 

Good evening Mike,

 

that's very kind of you to say so. Yes I use an airbrush and also normal brushes for washes and some detail work. I don't use anything special paint wise, except I am ultra picky on the quality of the primer I use. Top coats are Humbrol and Railmatch and some Phoenix Precision paint, but I often mix my own colours.

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Someone say Mark 1s again?

 

Triang RMB, flush glazed air braked on Commonwealths this is about 3 or 4 years ago.

 

MR-2.JPG

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12 hours ago, Daniel W said:

 

That GWR Tube was an absolute bargain for sure. The Ratio kit has been out of production for years and goes for over £20 on ebay.

Wow, I picked a couple up a year or so ago at a local show for $5 each. I'd better put them under lock and key...

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19 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

And now for some 'interesting' freight stock models on LB. Taken looking up as well!

 

347493952_upshots06FlatcaseandTube.jpg.fc104c3b52d07a33c62f713f88a24492.jpg

 

I bought this ex-LMS 'Flatcase' and ex-GWR 'Tube' wagon from a second-hand stand at a show last year. They were in EM Gauge. The proprietor told me that many potential punters had picked them up, but, on finding they were not OO, put them back, disappointed. He simply couldn't sell them. 

 

'How much each, please?', I asked. 'They're no good, I can't sell them', replied the proprietor. 'No problem' I'll buy a load'. 'You can have them for £3.00 each'. They were re-gauged to OO within minutes of my returning to my demonstration stand! I didn't even have to change the wheels.

 

Cheque book modelling.  Every man has his price.  Three quid, in this case.....:jester:

A real bargain, I'd say; re-gauging the wheels just about keeps you clear of The Dark Side too.  Just. :D

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

The one signal not climbed recently to get an elevated view on LB was the Down slow starter. 

 

That has now been scaled.....................

 

With this result....................

 

There are at least three reasons why this picture is time-anomalous, but it's my trainset.

 

Good morning Tony,

 

a complete guess based on a small detail, how about a tender anachronism on 60002?

Edited by Headstock
2 not 8

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9 hours ago, Headstock said:

I am ultra picky on the quality of the primer I use.

Morning Andrew.

I'm sure you've divulged this before, but can you remind me what you use for primer. I have been using bog standard Halfords grey acrylic for locos but not always 100% to my satisfaction. I'd be very interested in using something better if readily available and as Mike mentioned above, your paintwork is exemplary. Thanks in advance.

 

Clem

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11 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

The Vanwide (5th wagon along) over by the goods shed, it was built after the station had been demolished.

 

As already noted the Metro-Camm Pullmans. See above for why.

 

And the already stated Kylchap blastpipe/chimney on the V2, not done until after the buildings and platform were knocked down.

 

The LNER van in the siding next to the V2 looks a tad chubby compared to the other vans.

Good morning Clive,

 

'The Vanwide (5th wagon along) over by the goods shed, it was built after the station had been demolished.'

 

Four reasons then! When was the van you mention (the real one) built? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Clem said:

Morning Andrew.

I'm sure you've divulged this before, but can you remind me what you use for primer. I have been using bog standard Halfords grey acrylic for locos but not always 100% to my satisfaction. I'd be very interested in using something better if readily available and as Mike mentioned above, your paintwork is exemplary. Thanks in advance.

 

Clem

 

Good morning Clem,

 

I don't use Halford's were a top quality finish is required, it's fine on roofs, underframes and wagons, depending on the final finish required. I find the spray pattern is not fine enough for loco bodies or carriage sides. Before the lynch mob of people with shares in Halford's start moaning, I bet Tony isn't paying the likes of Ian Rathbone to get his Halford rattle cans out.

 

I have used Simoniz primer in the past, coincidentally, this was Larry Goddards paint of choice at one time. I used to be able to source this locally but the supply dried up (no pun intended). I had to order in by mail, but I had a lot off problems with duff cans, perhaps 50%. I'm now using Tetrosyl primer and so far I'm quite happy with the results. However, those  used to Halford's may find it less forgiving in its application, you have to be fast and accurate due to its unusual letter box shaped nozzle.

 

If you want a better finish, the biggest difference you can make is to buy an airbrush. They repay their investment very rapidly, they are much more flexible than rattle cans, less wasteful, have a finer spray patten (even on Halford's) cost less over time and are better for the environment. My opinion is that a good traditional brush painter, using good quality materials, can out perform the finish of rattle cans but how many are prepared to acquire the skills these days?  A good paint finish starts with the building of the model, I always work from the premise that paint does not cover up bad workmanship, how often to you here the opposite on RM web?

Edited by Headstock
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1 hour ago, Headstock said:

 

Good morning Tony,

 

a complete guess based on a small detail, how about a tender anachronism on 60002?

Good morning Andrew,

 

Not right there, I'm afraid.

 

It is 60002 (Bachmann/SE Finecast/Crownline/Wright/Rathbone), and she's one of two A4s in BR days to tow a streamlined non-corridor tender with the extra strip at the tank's base to carry the pre-War stainless steel strip (60001 was the other). It's plainly visible on the model, and is vital (in my view) for accuracy. 

 

There was a third A4 streamlined non-corridor tender with this feature, but it was badly damaged when its owner (the first SIR RALPH WEDGWOOD) was destroyed at York during the War. It was repaired, and then ran behind A2/1 60507 until that loco was withdrawn.  

 

The un-found (as yet) anomaly in the picture has to do with the A4, though; but you'll have to look closely. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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24 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Clive,

 

'The Vanwide (5th wagon along) over by the goods shed, it was built after the station had been demolished.'

 

Four reasons then! When was the van you mention (the real one) built? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Morning Tony

 

They were built in 1962.

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Andrew,

 

Not right there, I'm afraid.

 

It is 60002 (Bachmann/SE Finecast/Crownline/Wright/Rathbone), and she's one of two A4s in BR days to tow a streamlined non-corridor tender with the extra strip at the tank's base to carry the pre-War stainless steel strip (60001 was the other). It's plainly visible on the model, and is vital (in my view) for accuracy. 

 

There was a third A4 streamlined non-corridor tender with this feature, but it was badly damaged when its owner (the first SIR RALPH WEDGWOOD) was destroyed at York during the War. It was repaired, and then ran behind A2/1 60507 until that loco was withdrawn.  

 

The un-found (as yet) anomaly in the picture has to do with the A4, though; but you'll have to look closely. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Morning Tony,

 

I could see the strip on the tender, I thought I would give it a punt, being to lazy to find my green book. I've put it down somewhere silly but obvious. I thought it may be A4 related.

Edited by Headstock

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19 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

Good morning Clem,

 

I don't use Halford's were a top quality finish is required, it's fine on roofs, underframes and wagons, depending on the final finish required. I find the spray pattern is not fine enough for loco bodies or carriage sides. Before the lynch mob of people with shares in Halford's start moaning, I bet Tony isn't paying the likes of Ian Rathbone to get his Halford rattle cans out.

 

I have used Simoniz primer in the past, coincidentally, this was Larry Goddards paint of choice at one time. I used to be able to source this locally but the supply dried up (no pun intended). I had to order in by mail, but I had a lot off problems with duff cans, perhaps 50%. I'm now using Tetrosyl primer and so far I'm quite happy with the results. However, those  used to Halford's may find it less forgiving in its application, you have to be fast and accurate due to its unusual letter box shaped nozzle.

 

If you want a better finish, the biggest difference you can make is to buy an airbrush. They repay their investment very rapidly, they are much more flexible than rattle cans, less wasteful, have a finer spray patten (even on Halford's) cost less over time and are better for the environment. My opinion is that a good traditional brush painter, using good quality materials, can out perform the finish of rattle cans but how many are prepared to acquire the skills these days?  A good paint finish starts with the building of the model, I always work from the premise that paint does not cover up bad workmanship, how often to you here the opposite on RM web?

Good morning again, Andrew,

 

The finish you get on your models is incredible. 

 

However, for 'lesser mortals' don't discount entirely the finish which can be achieved by Halfords rattle can acrylics. I agree, they are more-wasteful, but a good top coat can be achieved with relative ease.

 

516495212_sequence54TheElizabethan.jpg.fc97a8999194039be9a17ac67ce3cfa7.jpg

 

I got this 'adequate' finish on my whole Elizabethan rake using Halfords' acrylic spray cans. 

 

283607633_Diagram1968BTK07.jpg.f42131b8aeb7647a58566b762915dbc7.jpg

 

And on this ex-LMS car, photographed under studio lighting. 

 

637361570_Diagram1968BTK08.jpg.0afbadae265a846cf53bfa2cfc888195.jpg

 

Under layout lighting as well, the finish is tolerable (for a layout coach), despite the roof being wrong. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Morning Tony

 

They were built in 1962.

Another one on the 'for sale for charity' list then!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Tony the A4 has overhead wire warning flashes.

Andrew

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