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Tony Wright

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10 hours ago, Headstock said:

I wonder what wonderful little critters got zapped when the L1's arrived, J5's, N5's, N7's?

Good morning Andrew.

 

Changes to Colwick motive power in the mid 1950s:

In 1955, 3 L1s and 3 more A5s came to Colwick, plus a couple of J11s and a couple more J6s. They can be matched with 3 withdrawn J5s and 2 withdrawn J6s as well as the transfer to West Yorks or withdrawal of all the remaining N1s. The N5s also moved away North to Sheffield and were replaced by J69s from Stratford. The J1s and J2s went a year or two earlier.  The N7s left for Stratford in April 1954. A couple or so N7s remained at Annesley until late 1956.

 

From about 1955 the main shunting tank for Colwick yards changed from being almost exclusinvely J52s to a mixture of J50s, J69s and J94s as the J52s dwindled and finally disappeared in April 1958.

 

In January 1956, there was a big heavy freight engine reorganisation with many O4s leaving for Mexborough and replaced with WDs. Before January 1956 34 O4s and 47 WDs.  After January 1956 Colwick had over 60 WDs and only 16 O4s. 

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6 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Dear old Colin. The phrase "lovable rogue" was tailor-made for him.

In the 1970's my older brother worked in Maidenhead and got to know Colin well, Colin found out my brother was intending to purchase a nameplate from a GW Castle and convinced him that a better idea was to purchase Hymek 7029 with a couple of others. My brother said he didn't regret the purchase, but it would have been far easier screwing the nameplate to the wall.

 

My memory of Colin was a somewhat 'Hairy' ride in a Triumph Vitesse, it wasn't so much the sound of the exhaust but the grin on the driver and his laughing :D

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Well done Clive to persevere with those MTK kits. I bought four MTK diesel locos back in the early 70's when I changed from TT to OO - A class 40 45, Clayton and 25. I built the 40 & Clayton bodies but couldn't fathom how to motorise them so they've been in limbo - part of my "historic collection" (or is it hysterical collection). Joueff brought out their 40, Mainline the 45, Hornby the 25 and a long wait for the Heljan Clayton.

 

My latest project is a bit DMU'ish - A North American freelance "Gas Electric" Doodlebug (as they were nicknamed) and trailer made with cut down O scale Rivarossi continental coaches and a Bachman O gauge DMU motor bogie bought many moons ago from Norman Wissendens wonderful though long closed model shop at Greenfield. I asked Clive how he cut his coaches - I used a Stanley knife on the sides and a razor saw on the roof after much careful marking checking etc. I'm pleased with the results, just a smidgin of filling needed. The motor bogie runs well and with a bit of weight pills both cars smoothly. Lots of work is still to do with detail, end windows, roof details etc

 

Mine is of no known prototype - many of the smaller American Railroads built (and rebuilt existing) such cars in backwoods shops - some right unwieldy results ensued - but they worked, keeping some sort of affordable passenger service viable on many lines.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

And only it's mother could love this !!

o15u52069918570807088.jpg

 

This  Santa Fe unit is interesting

7v933eu0f2943v68.jpg

 

And a typical Doodlebug.

doodlebug-31-headed-south-from-jc-2.jpg

 

Copy of a Brill unit from an old Railway Modeller mag (never throw your mags away  - especially the old 'uns !!)

191219122_zIMG_1388rszd.JPG.5a663079eab6f07851e3ff3216366eb3.JPG

 

Uncut too long coach - 2 window lengths need removing. It will be a Rock Island unit - (as it was a mighty fine line !!!)

768708310_zIMG_1389rszd.JPG.b10c06541412bfe327f3d41685ca6ab2.JPG

 

Power car done - Work in progress, on the second (trailer) car. Fitting the Bachmann motor bogie was a doddle.

1055849566_zIMG_1392rszd.JPG.f90f1464fe3c7ef11accb4b849491d5b.JPG

 

Units under test - they ran very well (makes a change !!). The enlarged window will be the door to the baggage / mail compartment.

1149551054_zIMG_1396rszd.JPG.ef5e325cb74c93d862b24c2c80d27f34.JPG

 

Front windows cut, need tidying up. Still plenty to do. She is at the Continental Divide - a bit higher than Ais Gill or Shap !!

1117549500_zIMG_1399rszd.JPG.199088ae859e0719e58a99af4dbbd03e.JPG

 

As Tony often writes, there is a pleasure in making things and getting them running.

 

Brit15

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22 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I'll stick with my Cravens on LB, right or not (I can feel the anguish on the part of those who only follow the path of righteousness!), although a B12/3 and arcane carriages are occasionally substituted, representing earlier times

 

The righteous can relax: a picture of a Cravens set working a Lincoln service in 1962 appears in the Oakwood Press book on the Lincoln to Grantham line, along with several photos of 114s, a B12 and an A5.

 

There's a photo of a Derby Lightweight on the line on this page.

 

 

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13 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

All I can tell you is that my experience of building MTK DMUs and wagons was not in any way stressful - certainly no worse than building Keyser's kits - though a newer generation of modellers sees fit to tear apart the reputation of that excellent company too.

 

It is all to easy nowadays to judge kits from the past by today's standards. Unless you were there - as you and I were - it's impossible to remember how little there was apart from the very limited ranges of RTR. We were more than happy to get out the tools, fettle the components; tweak the motors and fill the gaps between the castings with car body filler or solder ........ and we were bl**dy proud of the results, too!

 

It would seem, from the above posting, that at least one customer managed to make something worthwhile from the MTK Standard Five kit. My model of the same loco was 'bashed' from a Hornby tender-drive Black Five chassis and boiler; Kitmaster/ Airfix Standard Mogul components and a cast whitemetal high-sided Standard tender body kit. Despite the questionable provenance, it won a trophy at that year's Cambridge model railway exhibition.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

You can still have this experience today. Go pre grouping. 
you are kit building at best, because you have to. Some fine modern kits but not of everything you need. So the older kits are a must, picked up where you can. eBay half built or bits missing is taken as par for the course. 
for those bits missing you have to get inventive. I have had to learn casting, building in brass, plasticard, wood, white metal, resin, 3D prints. I had to learn cad ( though I need to get much better at it.) only this morning I had to make some springs and axle boxes for a scratch build carriage bogie. Why? Because I could track down enough bogies to go under my latest rake of carriages to build, except one. So out with the drill, and files and techniques learnt from Tony to make the missing one. 
richard
 

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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

It could well be (rather perversely) that the difficulties encountered in 'our' formative model-making days, made us 'better' modellers, eventually. Having to overcome the various problems presented by those kits of yore certainly engendered a sense of self-reliance, which has helped me ever since (though not in every discipline, I admit).

 

Now that is entirely true - and best sums up what I fear will be lost to the general body of younger railway modellers of today.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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In the spirit of show and tell, I’ve got my iron working and have got this far on a Comet chassis.  I don’t think it moves too badly under the crocodile clips.  I’ve tried putting pickups on once which resulted in abject failure.  I’ll have another go but probably from the top of the wheels as they’ll then by hidden by the body.  Also, are there any tips on how to attach RTR plastic bodies to frames?

 

David

 

 

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Fully agree with your sentiments gents (Tony Isherwood and Tony Wright) it seems that far fewer new and younger modellers have a go at scratch or kit building than of yore. However, to be fair, the quality and quantity of what was available ready to run was very restricted so we had no choice if we wanted to run something a "bit special". Thus the incentive to build nowdays is reduced due to the range and quality of ready to run stock.

 

Whatever one's views on the subject I just think that if you avoid having a go at building, say, a loco, you are missing so much pleasure and healthy reward. I just love bulding loco's, all the research before starting, working with some of the really helpful and friendly suppliers of parts and dealing with each problem as it occurs. All of which has been so helpful to wellbeing during lockdown

 

Sorry to go on gents!

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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5 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

 a Triumph Vitesse, it wasn't so much the sound of the exhaust but the grin on the driver and his laughing :D

Reminds me of a college mate who had a Vitesse in the late 60's.  Straight 6 engine in what was basically a Triumph Herald.  No room in the back (but we often managed 3) and the exhaust sound!  I have feeling he may have had a non-standard 'big bore' one but it was magnificent.  Good performance for the day but your average family saloon these days would easily see it off.  Not only in speed but in handling.

 

He swopped it for a MGC - the proper straight 6 one.  It got into an argument with a tree - and came off second best..............

 

He's OK though!

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5 hours ago, APOLLO said:

Well done Clive to persevere with those MTK kits. I bought four MTK diesel locos back in the early 70's when I changed from TT to OO - A class 40 45, Clayton and 25. I built the 40 & Clayton bodies but couldn't fathom how to motorise them so they've been in limbo - part of my "historic collection" (or is it hysterical collection). Joueff brought out their 40, Mainline the 45, Hornby the 25 and a long wait for the Heljan Clayton.

 

My latest project is a bit DMU'ish - A North American freelance "Gas Electric" Doodlebug (as they were nicknamed) and trailer made with cut down O scale Rivarossi continental coaches and a Bachman O gauge DMU motor bogie bought many moons ago from Norman Wissendens wonderful though long closed model shop at Greenfield. I asked Clive how he cut his coaches - I used a Stanley knife on the sides and a razor saw on the roof after much careful marking checking etc. I'm pleased with the results, just a smidgin of filling needed. The motor bogie runs well and with a bit of weight pills both cars smoothly. Lots of work is still to do with detail, end windows, roof details etc

 

Mine is of no known prototype - many of the smaller American Railroads built (and rebuilt existing) such cars in backwoods shops - some right unwieldy results ensued - but they worked, keeping some sort of affordable passenger service viable on many lines.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

And only it's mother could love this !!

o15u52069918570807088.jpg

 

This  Santa Fe unit is interesting

7v933eu0f2943v68.jpg

 

And a typical Doodlebug.

doodlebug-31-headed-south-from-jc-2.jpg

 

Copy of a Brill unit from an old Railway Modeller mag (never throw your mags away  - especially the old 'uns !!)

191219122_zIMG_1388rszd.JPG.5a663079eab6f07851e3ff3216366eb3.JPG

 

Uncut too long coach - 2 window lengths need removing. It will be a Rock Island unit - (as it was a mighty fine line !!!)

768708310_zIMG_1389rszd.JPG.b10c06541412bfe327f3d41685ca6ab2.JPG

 

Power car done - Work in progress, on the second (trailer) car. Fitting the Bachmann motor bogie was a doddle.

1055849566_zIMG_1392rszd.JPG.f90f1464fe3c7ef11accb4b849491d5b.JPG

 

Units under test - they ran very well (makes a change !!). The enlarged window will be the door to the baggage / mail compartment.

1149551054_zIMG_1396rszd.JPG.ef5e325cb74c93d862b24c2c80d27f34.JPG

 

Front windows cut, need tidying up. Still plenty to do. She is at the Continental Divide - a bit higher than Ais Gill or Shap !!

1117549500_zIMG_1399rszd.JPG.199088ae859e0719e58a99af4dbbd03e.JPG

 

As Tony often writes, there is a pleasure in making things and getting them running.

 

Brit15

My wife and I travelled on something similar to the doodlebugs, up the Douro valley in Portugal a few years ago.  Fantastically noisy, but cool enough with all the  windows open and a lovely line to spend the day on.

 

Tone

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, 5050 said:

Reminds me of a college mate who had a Vitesse in the late 60's.  Straight 6 engine in what was basically a Triumph Herald.  No room in the back (but we often managed 3) and the exhaust sound!  I have feeling he may have had a non-standard 'big bore' one but it was magnificent.  Good performance for the day but your average family saloon these days would easily see it off.  Not only in speed but in handling.

 

'Hark, the Herald axles swing', as we Triumph drivers used to say.  At least with the Italian Michelotti design of the Herald and Vitesse, the back end of your car would hop around a roundabout in a reasonably stylish sort of way.

 

Pete T.

 

Edited by PJT
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The pedals in the Herald were offset. it was very strange when you first got in one but you got used to it after a while.

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30 minutes ago, CUTLER2579 said:

The pedals in the Herald were offset. it was very strange when you first got in one but you got used to it after a while.

 

And on how many other affordable cars could you open the bonnet and sit in comfort on the front wheel while you worked on the engine?

 

Pete T.

 

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35 minutes ago, PJT said:

 

And on how many other affordable cars could you open the bonnet and sit in comfort on the front wheel while you worked on the engine?

 

Pete T.

 

 

I used to be able to sit on the scuttle of a Vauxhall Omega to change the cam belt, compared to Vectra fitting of via a small hole it was luxury.

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OK does anyone know anything about LMS 4-4-0s?

 

I could do with a few, probably 2.

 

Midland Railway 2P, LMS 2P and the compound.

 

The other locos are easy Castle Hall Jubilee and such I can aquire decent models but the 440s hmmm.

 

May be getting a LRM 0-4-4T.

 

I am trying to build a few backdated trains for the fun of it, which means lots of dirty ex MR LMS GWR stuff with the odd other thing.

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Mentioned earlier, I have looked for my MTK standard 5 but it's being rather elusive at the moment, I have stock split between the garage and small bedroom (dump!) in the house.

While looking I remembered I'd posted a picture of it before somewhere in the MTK thread in the collectable/vintage section so hopefully I've copied the picture across.

The proportions look a bit off but I think it looks better in the metal than the picture, anyway it was built getting on for 40 years ago.

The big gap where the firebox should be is actually an XO4 motor, hint don't take low level photos of your toy trains!

 

image.png.21dbd02ea1203eacb5bb97c274389127.png

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Looking at those DJH Atlantics, something didn't quite seem right, so I have had a look at the real thing and compared the two.

 

There seems to be a dimensional problem at the front end that spoils the look.

 

On the real thing, the top slidebar is invisible, hidden behind the valance. The top front curve of the cylinder is visible above the front footplate. Even allowing for a thick whitemetal footplate, are the cylinders too low or the footplate too high? It looks to be a fault in the kit rather than the assembly as it is the same on every one I have seen.

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39 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

A somewhat belated ‘snap’. This has been a lockdown project and is now just about complete.

 

D137C7B1-316A-442E-AC5A-375B463CAA6C.jpeg.9c82ff10adc88f3cad3fcdf3e82166e1.jpeg

 

I’m having some problems with the running on tighter curves - anything below about 40” - particularly Peco curved points where it seems to stall or derail the front bogie. Tony did you use full size 14mm bogie wheels or are yours slightly smaller diameter?

 

Andy

 

Hi Andy,

 

Congratulations on a beautiful looking model.   With regards the problem you are experiencing with negotiating curved track I have recently had to consider the same problem with a replacement chassis that I've built for a Bachman C1.  I suspect that this is too late for you to consider for your model but for anyone else thinking of building one of these in the future my approach has been to extend the fixed wheelbase of the loco by anchoring the rear of the bogie to the main frames  directly above the rear axle of the bogie.  This does not extend the wheelbase significantly and my model will easily negotiate 36" radius curves (in EM).  This approach has several benefits these being:  There is no need to provide clearance in the frames for the rear bogie wheels.  By effectively making the loco behave more like a 2-6-2 it reduces buffer swing and the risk of buffer locking.  The bogie helps to steer the locomotive through the curves. 

 

The following photo of the  completed frames should help to illustrate how this was achieved.  The vertical pin that can just be seen directly above the rear bogie axle is inserted through a plate soldered between the frames and it is this that allows the back of the bogie to control the movement of the frames through the curves.  

 

IMG_2100.jpg.b2867fe2cd0378277afe4efcd213786b.jpg

 

Regards,

 

Frank

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My modelling efforts can't compete with others on this thread, but this was the challenge for today, which arrived in this morning's post:

 

50152318216_d229778953_c.jpgP1080775AM by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

The crimson and cream Bachmann Thompson corridor third/second is almost impossible to find. One changed hands on eBay recently for £80 (no, I didn't buy it). Much to my surprise, I found no fewer than four at £40 each second hand on the Hattons website. They had been 'weathered' by their previous owner. This turned out to be merely spraying the sides crudely, as illustrated, and nothing else. Consequently, they and the composite and brake third/second that came with them looked awful, including windows covered with paint as well as the body sides. Some were worse than others. The brake was probably worst of all but I didn't take any photos of it before I attacked it.

 

Hence, much of today has been spent cleaning up this mess. I have I think managed to rescue them. 

 

The next challenge is to work out how to re-wheel them. This may seem an odd thing to identify as a challenge but the way the Bachmann bogies are made makes it so, Normal 26 mm pinpoint axles rattle around and the metal on the inside of the bogies means it's not a simple case of fitting bearings. If anyone has re-wheeled these carriages, I would be grateful for any tips. They have to be re-wheeled eventually as they are destined for a well-known EM gauge layout.

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26 minutes ago, robertcwp said:

The next challenge is to work out how to re-wheel them. This may seem an odd thing to identify as a challenge but the way the Bachmann bogies are made makes it so, Normal 26 mm pinpoint axles rattle around and the metal on the inside of the bogies means it's not a simple case of fitting bearings. If anyone has re-wheeled these carriages, I would be grateful for any tips. They have to be re-wheeled eventually as they are destined for a well-known EM gauge layout.

Have a look at this from Alan Gibson.  It may give you an idea even if you choose not to buy the actual tool.

http://www.alangibsonworkshop.com/RTR Drill.pdf

 

Frank 

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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

A somewhat belated ‘snap’. This has been a lockdown project and is now just about complete.

 

D137C7B1-316A-442E-AC5A-375B463CAA6C.jpeg.9c82ff10adc88f3cad3fcdf3e82166e1.jpeg7D7636BE-C1C2-4E58-9B6B-006C7050F85A.jpeg.357a04080b7a36f4d4252b783bcc2665.jpegDF3B2B4C-11F1-4512-ADE2-1726128A9AD5.jpeg.a1be15011ff6b4b7b4c57404efaa0a25.jpeg

 

It’s built using the DJH kit and will become 990’ Henry Oakley’ as preserved so that I can recreate the Plant Centenarian railtour and some of the service trains ran before that tour as tests.

 

I’ve spent a solid day today trying to get it running smoothly and I’ve made good progress as I hope this video shows

 

 

Sorry about the out of period quad art - the railtour stock is largely unbuilt as yet. Headstock of this parish is digging me out a stock list for the train (Any progress Andrew?) but it will need a lot of D.186 TOs and some catering vehicles - I have some, but most are in maroon, so I’ll either have to repaint or build more - a long term project. 

 

I’m having some problems with the running on tighter curves - anything below about 40” - particularly Peco curved points where it seems to stall or derail the front bogie. Tony did you use full size 14mm bogie wheels or are yours slightly smaller diameter?

 

I will run it in for a bit, but then comes the paint shop. Does anyone know of a source for GNR lining transfers? I recognise that LNER transfers would do for most, but the concave sections on the corners of the tender will be challenging. 

 

Andy

 

Good evening Andy,

 

Impressive workmanship, but might it be better to use .45mm nickel silver wire for the handrails? Far less chance of their bending.

 

I did use 14mm bogie/pony wheels, but new ones with RP25 profile flanges. The ones on your C2 seem to be the old-style 14mm Romfords - too large a flange, and two too many spokes as well. Please change them.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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9 minutes ago, Chuffer Davies said:

Have a look at this from Alan Gibson.  It may give you an idea even if you choose not to buy the actual tool.

http://www.alangibsonworkshop.com/RTR Drill.pdf

 

Frank 

Thanks, that looks like an interesting tool to have. However, the problem here is a different one. Here is a view of the bogie:

 

50151914073_96755bb3d1_c.jpgP1080776am by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

The metal inside already give an excellent pinpoint bearing. Taking this out would make the spacing even wider, and too wide for 26 mm axles even with new bearings. The Bachmann wheels, which are split axle, have a point to point distance of a bit over 26 mm. When I put a Romford wheelset in, it rattled about. I don't know if that is because Romford's 26 mm was a bit on the short side or whether it is because the spacing is too wide. Before going any further, I shall try some Gibson EM wheelsets, when I have some. 

 

The image also illustrates the other problem with these bogies with their original wheels. Because wheel is not insulated from bearing, the metal electrically links the two wheels on one side of the bogie. This is a real pain with a DC layout as the bogies then bridge section breaks. On my existing fleet, I have had to modify each bogie to eliminate this whilst keeping the original wheels, which run fine. The same issue applies to porthole stock and Mark 2f stock.

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