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Tony Wright

Wright writes.....

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In 1969 after working for 5 years and night school I was accepted at York Teachers Training College to teach Chemistry and Maths as a secondary subject.   It would have been a 15 month course if I remember correctly.  I was also offered a place at the University of Surrey in a four year degree course.    I really did want to be a teacher and my girlfriend at the time also favored that.   However, I could see the writing on the wall for teaching, both politically and academically and with some reluctance I went for the degree.  Did I ever make the correct choice?  I look at teaching today and I have to despair.  There is no way, especially as a male, I could have survived.  However my degree in Metallurgy ended up giving me a pretty good and interesting working life (until Management became the MBA Management Style - bit like teaching?).  Further, it has provided me with an adequate pension sufficient to carry out my various hobbies and buy a beer without having to wonder where the money will come from.   One interesting aside, to me at least, is that here in Ontario the media did a bit of an 'expose' on Public and Private Schools  (Remember in Canada a Public School is just what it says as is a Private School).  One of the observations was that the highest percentage of Private School attendees was Children whose parents taught in the Public School System. 

 

On another note, Tony, you are absolutely correct about a servo motor and its torque.  At the beginning when I was learning how to set servos up, I did manage to lift several signals right off their mounts.  Fortunately I use  magnets to place and hold the signal, so the damage was minimal  although I did have to replace several activation wires.

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11 hours ago, Atso said:

 

Lovely photos Tony, only surpassed by seeing them in the flesh.

 

As you know I've been working on Hadley Wood's signal box recently.

 

20200727_202539-1.jpg.1bfda109e38e5a7e20e4b18adc3c0cbe.jpg

 

20200727_202608-1.jpg.86b16b455a203dc28518ffbdb3cf7b91.jpg

 

I'm still not finished as I'd like to revise the stairs and windows. However, I'm pretty pleased with it other than those issues.

 

Not a build yet, but I've been working on some scale drawings for the main station building and road bridge. These have been produced using measurements taken of the surviving bits and using this information to extrapolate the dimensions of the station building itself (long gone) and a few other bits.

 

1941292481_HadleyWoodBridgeWorkings.jpg.c88623b212aca75c0d19090eeccef982.jpg

 

315398922_HadleyWoodStationBackElevation.jpg.c0b0862a7d162c736b96e1556e546ffa.jpg

 

1736483709_HadleyWoodStationFrontElevation.jpg.e70a81abeaf5066d5aea2f101587d9e8.jpg

 

P1010402.jpg.2eabe6bdf5b419e2f9febda64ed65533.jpg

 

I've still got to work out the platform waiting rooms (and the main station building's chimneys!) but the surviving canopy supports on the stairway have given me essential dimensions to work out the rest.

That's splendid work, Steve,

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Unfortunately, any pictures of Hadley Wood I have were taken after the widenings in 1958/'59. Were the original station buildings demolished then?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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9 hours ago, nsl714 said:

Hello,

 

Long time reader of "Wright Writes", first time poster here. When I started modelling in 7mm O scale proper a few years ago, this thread, as well as the Right Track films on engine kit building have proved to be of significant inspiration. I started with a number of Parkside plastic wagon kits, and have now started dabbling in brass construction. So, I present here for scrutiny my most ambitious build to date. This is a Scorpio 7mm Siphon F which I have built and painted over the past few months, now mostly complete. Only a few repairs to detail I have clumsily knocked off, varnish, and weathering remain. This has been a great learning experience in Soldering, and I'm turning my eyes toward an engine kit now that this has been completed.

 

492951672_SiphonF1.JPG.f6ecccdc1f48c70ef6756bbcd6216022.JPG

 

Thanks,

Zach

The warmest of welcomes to posting on here, Zach,

 

Some splendid soldering (and everything on the model).

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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43 minutes ago, sdmjsmith said:

Here's a building I've been working on these past few months. 

 

It is my rendition of the water tower at Colwick in later years.  Based on black and white photos of the real thing, I'm really not sure of the colours, although the brick was definately brick!  From aerial photos I'm pretty sure it had acquired some sort of flat roof by the post war era and I've taken a bit of a punt as to what was actually up there!  Topically, if it looks familiar that is because it is/was very similar to the tower at the Retford GN engine shed.  Great Northern Railway Engine Sheds Vol.2 by Griffiths and Hooper is an excellent research source.

 

Constructed to 4mm scale from polystyrene, sheathed with brick plasticard and, mostly, etched brass windows.

 

Next on the to-do list is to finish the Old Shed and build the Erecting (!) Shed.  Oh and I have a J6 somewhere that I really must start!

 

Happy modelling.

 

Matthew

R0002012.JPG.f9523250d0ab56b5db9f13941b2d6321.JPG

 

Wonderful modelling, Matthew,

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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9 hours ago, Theakerr said:

In 1969 after working for 5 years and night school I was accepted at York Teachers Training College to teach Chemistry and Maths as a secondary subject.   It would have been a 15 month course if I remember correctly.  I was also offered a place at the University of Surrey in a four year degree course.    I really did want to be a teacher and my girlfriend at the time also favored that.   However, I could see the writing on the wall for teaching, both politically and academically and with some reluctance I went for the degree.  Did I ever make the correct choice?  I look at teaching today and I have to despair.  There is no way, especially as a male, I could have survived.  However my degree in Metallurgy ended up giving me a pretty good and interesting working life (until Management became the MBA Management Style - bit like teaching?).  Further, it has provided me with an adequate pension sufficient to carry out my various hobbies and buy a beer without having to wonder where the money will come from.   One interesting aside, to me at least, is that here in Ontario the media did a bit of an 'expose' on Public and Private Schools  (Remember in Canada a Public School is just what it says as is a Private School).  One of the observations was that the highest percentage of Private School attendees was Children whose parents taught in the Public School System. 

 

On another note, Tony, you are absolutely correct about a servo motor and its torque.  At the beginning when I was learning how to set servos up, I did manage to lift several signals right off their mounts.  Fortunately I use  magnets to place and hold the signal, so the damage was minimal  although I did have to replace several activation wires.

Some interesting comments about teaching/education (from everyone).

 

I once taught with an excellent teacher who'd enjoyed the benefits of a 'privileged' upbringing. Her father had been an eminent physician and she'd attended prep', public and finishing schools. Her speech, of course, was perfect. 

 

Now, for some reason I cannot fathom out (champagne socialism?), although not actually rebelling, she'd somehow 'rejected' the standards of her upbringing and become extremely left-wing in her outlook. Not for her own children, the education of the wealthy. No, the local comp' for them (even though I'm sure she could have afforded private education for her sons). How they turned out, I have no idea. 

 

At the same school there was another excellent teacher whose background was entirely different. Not for her a privileged upbringing, but (because of that?) she ensured that her own daughter was educated privately. Not only that, she'd married 'well' and could afford a much better standard of living than previously. With that came an 'acquired' accent. My mate and I used to collapse with laughter when, in a robust discussion, she'd suddenly come out with a full Black Country twang. Her mother (who was a real yo-er, wee-mer and yam-yam; students of Black Country dialect will know exactly what I mean by those expressions) was never invited to staff functions. Sad. 

 

I thought it all rather hypocritical. Rather in the way that far-left politicians, intent on dismantling decent grammar schools, send their own off-springs to private education.

 

Is there such 'snobbery and hypocritical behaviour in railway modelling, I wonder? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

That's splendid work, Steve,

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Unfortunately, any pictures of Hadley Wood I have were taken after the widenings in 1958/'59. Were the original station buildings demolished then?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Thank you Tony. The original platform buildings were demolished during the widening works but I do have one or two usable photos. Sadly there is little recorded of what the arrangement of the backs of these buildings were so some educated guesses will likely be required. The main station building remained, slightly altered and minus the chimneys, until (I think) electrification and additional height was required for the wires - I understand that the original tunnels were dug out to lower the track bed at the same time.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

I thought it all rather hypocritical. Rather in the way that far-left politicians, intent on dismantling decent grammar schools, send their own off-springs to private education.

 

Is there such 'snobbery and hypocritical behaviour in railway modelling, I wonder? 

 

I think that education is ultimately what the student makes of it. Good teachers and course content is always very helpful, but the student must be engaged and willing to both learn and put the work in.

 

Having given up with A Level Biology, Chemistry and Geography at school in the late 1990's, I returned to education at my local college in the early 2000's and undertook a condensed AS and A2 evening course (two hours a week) in Business Studies. One of the first questions the other students asked the tutor was what grade they could expect. His reply was most students on this particular course gained a D grade while the highest grade he'd experienced was a C. Instantly there were shouts about how this must because of the quality of teaching (not helped that the tutor was from another country) and two people left there and then.

 

Over the next 32 weeks of the course, at least 50% of the class failed to show up to 25% or more of the lessons (most didn't do the homework) and only myself and one other maintained a 100% attendance record. The two of us were also the most engaged students during lesson time and we happily lapped up everything the tutor could give us. In the end I achieved maximum marks in my AS exam and nearly equaled it in my A2 exam - my friend walked away with Bs in both exams. It was then the two of us discovered that our tutor was also a professor at the local university where his classes were some of the most popular and 'his' batting average in student results was much higher than in the course I attended. Surely evidence that the student must do the work to achieve the grades?

 

Considering I was working two jobs at the time (and spending every free hour studying), I was over the moon and got accepted to do a degree equivalent at another college (with a great endorsement from my tutor), which I accepted and completed.

 

With regard to your comments above, I think that, regardless of political ideology, people will generally (there are always exceptions) grab opportunities of privilege (whether financial, position, education, etc) that their position allows (all animals are equal...). Does such snobbery and hypocritical behaviour exist in railway modelling? I suspect that, as with the hobby itself, the answer would generally depend on the individuals own values, beliefs and objectives regarding the hobby and how they judges (too strong a word?) others by the standards they (claim to?) uphold - after all, we all view the word through the prism of our individual identities.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

 

Is there such 'snobbery and hypocritical behaviour in railway modelling, I wonder? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 


Yes, plenty. The hobby is a cross section of society. But may I suggest probably not the best direction to take the thread into.
 

Meanwhile back on wot I dun....

 

5C80970D-4049-45A5-8A31-7C77EA9BD37D.jpeg.dad632fcc4a1a73242c71ce44d6ea2b4.jpeg

 

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24 minutes ago, PMP said:


Yes, plenty. The hobby is a cross section of society. But may I suggest probably not the best direction to take the thread into.
 

Meanwhile back on wot I dun....

 

5C80970D-4049-45A5-8A31-7C77EA9BD37D.jpeg.dad632fcc4a1a73242c71ce44d6ea2b4.jpeg

 

Thanks Paul,

 

I think this thread rather pleases itself in which direction it goes........

 

For my part, as long as someone's prepared to have a go at making/doing things for themselves, trying their best and, if possible, helping others, then that's enough. 

 

I knew that from my teaching days.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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2 minutes ago, Jesse Sim said:

Here we are ladies and gentlemen, the C2 works, amazing stuff that DCC... 

 

Thanks again Tony, I’ll give you a call some point this week to discuss payment, I suppose I’d better or I’d lose my lodgings.... 

 

 

 

Thanks Jesse,

 

What a lovely overall scene. I'm delighted you're delighted with your Klondike.

 

I assume the decoder (which I installed!) needed the CVs setting for optimum performance? I know that sounds if if I know what I'm talking about, but I'm an excellent actor. I had no means of testing it, other than ensuring it worked on DC.

 

Good to talk just now. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.

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21 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Another of Ian's buildings, this time the original engine house from Lord Willoughby's private railway. After that system was closed and abandoned, this structure saw service as a stable. 

I suppose you could say that it had been still in use as a 'stabling point'.

 

Lloyd

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42 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Paul,

 

I think this thread rather pleases itself in which direction it goes........

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 


The thread does ebb and flow very nicely and importantly, interestingly.

 

My thoughts were along the lines of the hypocrisy and the hobby comment. A poorly thought through and expressed comment could lead to issues for both the writer and the forum. Anyway, enough of the ‘fun police’! :)

brgds


 

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1 hour ago, PMP said:


Yes, plenty. The hobby is a cross section of society. But may I suggest probably not the best direction to take the thread into.
 

Meanwhile back on wot I dun....

 

5C80970D-4049-45A5-8A31-7C77EA9BD37D.jpeg.dad632fcc4a1a73242c71ce44d6ea2b4.jpeg

 

Lovely work on the chevrons, which are the devil to get right.  I forget how many evenings I spent trying to get an acceptable result on my snowploughs - and as the photo shows in the end I settled for less than perfection and  retaining my sanity.   (I claim.)

 

Tone

DB965204 Snowplough 04.jpg

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19 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

I wish I could be more enthusiastic about them, as they are such exquisite pieces of miniature engineering. To provide some balance, there are 33 currently installed and working on Grantham, with a further 5 on Shap, all now protected by Andrew's electronics. Since the last of the protection circuits was installed, we've done four shows in total with no failures.

 

I have been using these small spring return solenoids bought for £1 each from eBay (though they are now £1.98). Very basic but they work. Rated at 12v but seam to work well on 9v. They do not have the force to throw through several cranks but work with a single crank.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC12V-Push-Pull-Type-Micro-Solenoid-Electromagnet-Mini-Solenoid-Stroke-4mm-120mA/252590841258?hash=item3acf965daa:g:-2EAAOSwOVpXbK0a

 

signals.jpg.a60bdd2815959ac0b3d85e72d4ab9e9d.jpg

 

Mike Wiltshire

 

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Thanks for the help on SEAGULL’s tender a few pages back. I decided it was easier to start again than dismantle the tender that I had, so I dug a second kit out of the roundtuit pile and made up this tender from that. It’s had the bottom beading removed, the streamlining reduced round the front of the tender, the top of the tender cut down either side of the corridor connector and the faring reduced in height all along the length of the tender. From what I can ascertain this last item was done to two of the three cut down tenders; the other Just had the faring cut down behind the coal division plate - this third tender was on SEAGULL in 1948 but transferred to LORD FARRINGDON in 1954.

 

FF24526B-ABFC-444D-8160-6D36FC604732.jpeg.c3b53c29f6dbf0e05f2d749f29a3b5be.jpeg622F1F95-86F3-45B7-99C0-C18746FF7319.jpeg.d7ac0640f89f83cfd2e30882d1b4a317.jpeg

 

I found the reinstatement of the beading round the back of the tender a right fiddle and it’s not very neat but I’m hoping I will lose the imperfections under a coat of filler primer - which will be required to cover the poor quality of some of the castings anyway.

 

Andy

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Jesse,

 

What a lovely overall scene. I'm delighted you're delighted with your Klondike.

 

I assume the decoder (which I installed!) needed the CVs setting for optimum performance? I know that sounds if if I know what I'm talking about, but I'm an excellent actor. I had no means of testing it, other than ensuring it worked on DC.

 

Good to talk just now. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.

I’m delighted that you’re delighted about me being delighted.....

 

I actually haven’t done anything, apart forming changing the direction, as forward was reverse and changed the decoder number from the factory 3 to the number on the cab. 

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Looking great @Jesse Sim
I very much like the open space of your main line. Very GNR in feel! 

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9 minutes ago, Hawin Dooiey said:

Looking great @Jesse Sim
I very much like the open space of your main line. Very GNR in feel! 

Thanks Tom, imagine if I had more space...

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24 minutes ago, Jesse Sim said:

Thanks Tom, imagine if I had more space...

 

and that my friend....is what we all say.

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I can understand a white metal locomotive body being beneficial to a kit build - it gives plenty of mass for traction.

 

However, seeing the A4 above, I struggle to understand why its a good medium for a tender body. Surely it's just dead weight to haul around at the expense of a coach or two. Does anyone replace the flat body sides and coal space with plasticard to reduce the weight?

 

Steven B.

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3 hours ago, thegreenhowards said:

Thanks for the help on SEAGULL’s tender a few pages back. I decided it was easier to start again than dismantle the tender that I had, so I dug a second kit out of the roundtuit pile and made up this tender from that. It’s had the bottom beading removed, the streamlining reduced round the front of the tender, the top of the tender cut down either side of the corridor connector and the faring reduced in height all along the length of the tender. From what I can ascertain this last item was done to two of the three cut down tenders; the other Just had the faring cut down behind the coal division plate - this third tender was on SEAGULL in 1948 but transferred to LORD FARRINGDON in 1954.

 

FF24526B-ABFC-444D-8160-6D36FC604732.jpeg.c3b53c29f6dbf0e05f2d749f29a3b5be.jpeg622F1F95-86F3-45B7-99C0-C18746FF7319.jpeg.d7ac0640f89f83cfd2e30882d1b4a317.jpeg

 

I found the reinstatement of the beading round the back of the tender a right fiddle and it’s not very neat but I’m hoping I will lose the imperfections under a coat of filler primer - which will be required to cover the poor quality of some of the castings anyway.

 

Andy

Good afternoon Andy,

 

I agree that soldering on the rear beading is a fiddle, but a necessary one. 

 

Your reduction of the front faring is excellent. When I first built these tenders, I was in ignorance of this necessity.

 

By the way it's Faringdon with only one 'r'. I refused to photograph one of a manufacturer's high-priced O Gauge RTR A4s on one occasion. Why? Because the nameplate showed LORD FARRINGDON. I also refused to photograph another, because its nameplate was KING FISHER! Lost in translation in Korea, I think.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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15 minutes ago, Steven B said:

I can understand a white metal locomotive body being beneficial to a kit build - it gives plenty of mass for traction.

 

However, seeing the A4 above, I struggle to understand why its a good medium for a tender body. Surely it's just dead weight to haul around at the expense of a coach or two. Does anyone replace the flat body sides and coal space with plasticard to reduce the weight?

 

Steven B.

Good afternoon Steven,

 

Though I agree white metal is heavy, it's actually a good medium for a tender because of it. It gives superb stability, especially when it's between the loco and a (very) heavy train. 

 

Despite the weight, with a sub-frame, the actual friction isn't too much, and all my white metal tenders run really freely. In fact, any tender I build from brass is substantially-ballasted with lead. 

 

The 'proof' as they say - even with heavy tenders, LBs big locos will still pull full-length, heavy trains; by full-length, I mean in excess of 12 kit-built cars...............

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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