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1 hour ago, Headstock said:

Not my thing, the right engine for the train will always my favourite.

 

Andrew, I don't think our approaches are that different. I still prefer to model the typical rather than the unusual, but I was just saying that restricting yourself to a given day can have unforeseen consequences. I chose a day in 1950 for working out the condition of locos I wanted to model. I was then shown copies of entries from a S. Manchester signalbox register showing half of the locos that passed through Chorlton on that particular day. Having already produced a model of 45649 Hawkins I was not then going to re-number it just because on the 34 occasions it was recorded as working a Manchester-St Pancras express between 23 Feb 1950 and 8 June 1950 it didn't work one on my chosen day in that period.

 

My point about variety wasn't suggesting a free-for-all, just a contrast to today when a non-available loco often means the train is caped or 30 years ago when the replacement traction could only have been something the driver was trained to drive (and in my area usually either a 47 or one or more 31s).

 

Incidently the same period identified above saw 98 different 8Fs and 88 4Fs recorded on a stretch of line (Manchester South District railway) with comparatively few goods and mineral workings.

 

Finally, RE Rose observed. That's what made the book fascinating to me - he contrasted the (changing) usual observed over an extended period with the unusual.

 

Simon

 

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40 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

Afternoon Tony,

 

LSGC fulfills all those criteria, as it is a goods yard, loop lines, carriage sheds a mainline that's a real line. It has operation for everything from station pilot duties, to pick up goods, to the attaching and detaching of goods on route, locomotive changes, LE movements as well as the background mainline activity. 

 

Even the roundy roundy bits have to be operated correctly, as it has rising and falling gradients that the operator has to respond to in order to keep their train under control. Off course they have to respond to demands from other operators operating.

 

It can scare the ****out of new operators though.

 

 

 

Indeed. Super layout and great to watch. The passing trains passing behind make a super backdrop and counterpoint to the activity at the front.

 

Of course no layout is perfect.

 

LSGC would be if it had just been set 50 years earlier! 

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1 minute ago, t-b-g said:

 

Indeed. Super layout and great to watch. The passing trains passing behind make a super backdrop and counterpoint to the activity at the front.

 

Of course no layout is perfect.

 

LSGC would be if it had just been set 50 years earlier! 

 

I can't totally argue against that, LSGC is certainly not perfect and a pure GC setting has its merits. You would have to rip up quite a bit of the loop lines that were extended for wartime traffic. That would adversely effect operation.

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Just now, Headstock said:

 

I can't totally argue against that, LSGC is certainly not perfect and a pure GC setting has its merits. You would have to rip up quite a bit of the loop lines that were extended for wartime traffic. That would adversely effect operation.

 

I don't care!

 

A fully lined out and very smart Immingham on a fish train, an 11B on a clerestory Dining Car set or a GWR Dean Single on their service would more than make up for that.

 

I did see Andy Gibb's Whetstone layout at a couple of the handful of shows it did before it got scrapped. I recall being mesmerised by a tiny 0-6-0 (probably what became a J9 or 10 later) with a huge rake of PO coal wagons.

 

Sadly, I will never have room to build anything like LSGC or Whetstone and I don't have enough enthusiasm to build a layout that would only go out to shows any more so I will never be able to run such long trains personally but having Buckingham to play with isn't a bad consolation.

 

I do get to run some decent length trains on layouts that others have too, so that will do for me.

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40 minutes ago, 65179 said:

 

Andrew, I don't think our approaches are that different. I still prefer to model the typical rather than the unusual, but I was just saying that restricting yourself to a given day can have unforeseen consequences. I chose a day in 1950 for working out the condition of locos I wanted to model. I was then shown copies of entries from a S. Manchester signalbox register showing half of the locos that passed through Chorlton on that particular day. Having already produced a model of 45649 Hawkins I was not then going to re-number it just because on the 34 occasions it was recorded as working a Manchester-St Pancras express between 23 Feb 1950 and 8 June 1950 it didn't work one on my chosen day in that period.

 

My point about variety wasn't suggesting a free-for-all, just a contrast to today when a non-available loco often means the train is caped or 30 years ago when the replacement traction could only have been something the driver was trained to drive (and in my area usually either a 47 or one or more 31s).

 

Incidently the same period identified above saw 98 different 8Fs and 88 4Fs recorded on a stretch of line (Manchester South District railway) with comparatively few goods and mineral workings.

 

Finally, RE Rose observed. That's what made the book fascinating to me - he contrasted the (changing) usual observed over an extended period with the unusual.

 

Simon

 

 

Too true,

 

a balance has to be struck, especially with an exhibition layout. The punter would get bored with thirty identical coal trains all with O4's on. Evil me would relish the idea but producing all those coal wagons would kill me. The unusual is common as muck in model railway land and the typical and everyday is like hens teeth on wheels. I get concerned when layouts start running too many special trains. What every day forgotten wonder, often more interesting, has been sacrificed for a bunch of opens, and a pet locomotive, on a dull as dishwater excursion train.  The latter have there place but I I don't have any pet locomotives. A B7 would be cool though. You can tell that my solder that was supposed to arrive on Friday still hasn't got here. I had better go dig something in the garden.

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14 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

 

I don't care!

 

A fully lined out and very smart Immingham on a fish train, an 11B on a clerestory Dining Car set or a GWR Dean Single on their service would more than make up for that.

 

I did see Andy Gibb's Whetstone layout at a couple of the handful of shows it did before it got scrapped. I recall being mesmerised by a tiny 0-6-0 (probably what became a J9 or 10 later) with a huge rake of PO coal wagons.

 

Sadly, I will never have room to build anything like LSGC or Whetstone and I don't have enough enthusiasm to build a layout that would only go out to shows any more so I will never be able to run such long trains personally but having Buckingham to play with isn't a bad consolation.

 

I do get to run some decent length trains on layouts that others have too, so that will do for me.

 

Iminghams, fish, 11B, Dean single, tiny 0-6-0's, PO wagons, oooh that's a hard one.

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41 minutes ago, 65179 said:

 

...My point about variety wasn't suggesting a free-for-all, just a contrast to today when a non-available loco often means the train is caped...

 

 

Is it a bird?

 

Is it a plane?

 

No - that there thing is Super-train!

 

 

(Apologies Simon).

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27 minutes ago, Northmoor said:

In the world of model railways, that may be the very definition of "understatement".

 

Over the last six months, the usual Buckingham operating sessions have had to stop but recently I have come up with ways, other than the Automatic Crispin (still to be restored to working order) to run the layout solo. It means setting points and signals at one station then moving to the other to drive but it is a great way to spend an hour or two.

 

Working solo also means that if something goes wrong, I can investigate without keeping the others hanging around waiting.

 

This afternoon, the Buckingham station pilot stuttered a bit. Great lumps of dirt were removed from the pick ups but on closer inspection, the carbon on the brushes has worn through and the brass carrier arms are running on the commutator.

 

I wonder how many miles the little thing has run in 70 or so years to get that much wear!

 

 

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54 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

I have puzzled long and hard about signalbox steps as I build quite a few.

 

I have decided that the neatness of a ready made step from Plastruct, thinned along the edge of the treads, is preferable to anything I might be able to make myself.

 

 

I am indeed using the Plastruct steps! They are cut and ready, but I note the idea about thinning the edge of the treads. Thank you.

The problem is the rather ornate diagonal cross arrangement on the handrails that the NER CD used on this design.

(Sorry about the strange perspective, I cropped an earlier scan used for a different purpose!.

 

 

 

Post_steps_01.jpg.7ee04a7d1d5c6fdd128a9128c48a4e5b.jpg

 

You will see that my version has the steps at the opposite end. Fortunately Battersby Cabin was the same way round as mine so I have good pictures to copy from. Having got this far I don't want to rush!

 

 

 

 

Post_15.jpg.dbda390e34f85c1f0fdcbeadb8611be4.jpg

 

However, just now while cutting the grass I had an idea!

 

When it has developed a bit more I'll post a picture.

 

I like your box, with the lovely finials. Is it a GN prototype?

 

 

 

Edited by drmditch
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2 minutes ago, drmditch said:

 

I am indeed using the Plastruct steps! They are cut and ready, but I note the idea about thinning the edge of the treads. Thank you.

The problem is the rather ornate diagonal cross arrangement on the handrails that the NER CD used on this design.

(Sorry about the strange perspective, I cropped an earlier scan used for a different purpose!.

 

 

 

Post_steps_01.jpg.7ee04a7d1d5c6fdd128a9128c48a4e5b.jpg

 

You will see that my version has the steps at the opposite end. Fortunately Battersby Cabin is the same way round as mine so I have good pictures to copy from. Having got this far I don't want to rush!

 

 

 

 

Post_15.jpg.dbda390e34f85c1f0fdcbeadb8611be4.jpg

 

However, just now while cutting the grass I had an idea!

 

When it has developed a bit more I'll post a picture.

 

I like your box, with the lovely finials. Is it a GN prototype?

 

 

 

 

You might find something suitable at York Modelmaking.

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20 minutes ago, drmditch said:

 

I am indeed using the Plastruct steps! They are cut and ready, but I note the idea about thinning the edge of the treads. Thank you.

The problem is the rather ornate diagonal cross arrangement on the handrails that the NER CD used on this design.

(Sorry about the strange perspective, I cropped an earlier scan used for a different purpose!.

 

 

 

Post_steps_01.jpg.7ee04a7d1d5c6fdd128a9128c48a4e5b.jpg

 

You will see that my version has the steps at the opposite end. Fortunately Battersby Cabin was the same way round as mine so I have good pictures to copy from. Having got this far I don't want to rush!

 

 

 

 

Post_15.jpg.dbda390e34f85c1f0fdcbeadb8611be4.jpg

 

However, just now while cutting the grass I had an idea!

 

When it has developed a bit more I'll post a picture.

 

I like your box, with the lovely finials. Is it a GN prototype?

 

 

 

 

I see your problem!

 

Some of the LD&ECR boxes had similar diagonals.

 

Luckily, some had much simpler handrails and a few had just a single post at the base and the top with a single handrail and no intermediate supports at all.

 

You don't need t guess which one I went for as you have seen the evidence.

 

I did make one with diagonals like that once and I built them up from three layers of 10 thou plasticard strips. The first layer was full sized for that section of the steps but just had one diagonal, the next layer had the opposite diagonal and I then infilled the opposite bits and added a third layer.

 

It wasn't quick but it was possible to get a consistent and neat job.

 

It is worth getting it right on your model. It is really top drawer modelling and it would be a shame to skimp on the last bit.

 

Edit to add that the LD&ECR signalboxes were pretty much a copy of GNR designs although if you look at the photos of them along the line, there were huge and really odd detail differences and I haven't found two exactly the same. Mine has features from three boxes built into one as I am modelling a fictional location and didn't want mine to be recognisable as any real box, keeping up the "every one different" tradition.

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On 10/09/2020 at 21:25, Tony Wright said:

 

Apart from what you do, does modelling in this style still take place? Most diesels I see on layouts these days seem to be mainly RTR, with just a few mods. 

 

I suppose the truth is it's no longer necessary.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

It doesn't matter about necessary, it is more about fun. Here's an ancient Hornby Class 21/29 made to look more like a Class 29. A few windows  filled in with grilles made of micro strip, plastic moulded big grilles removed and A1 Models etches in place, spurious moulded lines removed. The 07 is a Silver Fox resin body with the moulded handrails removed, the plan being to fit brass 0.45mm wire handrails and build a modified High Level Kits 03 chassis to go under it. The yellow box in the background is a 2 tone grey Class 31 that I got relatively cheap and am backdating it to BR blue, which are singularly more expensive.

 

Yes, both available rtr, but that doesn't give me an excuse to play with my relatively unused air brush and compressor set.

 

IMG_0938.jpg

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I wrote mater instead of matter. I don't suppose my mum cares about train sets.
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Woodcock29, Love the pictures of Firsby, fairly familiar with the area as my first wife (deceased) came from Louth and we did a lot of our courting in that general area finding the one (front) room pubs.  In your pictures I see a LNER J11, I also see that it has a vacuum brake but it does not have a vacuum ejector pipe.  I posted a comment a couple of pages back about discovering that both my Little Engines J11s did not have a vacuum ejector pipe and that I would probably have to fit one.  I am sort of hoping that you can tell me something i have missed and I do not have to fit them.  Thanks

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On 12/09/2020 at 20:27, Bucoops said:

Today has definitely been one of the most productive modelling days I've had in forever. The underframe is almost done on the full brake.

 

I've ben using the Isinglass drawing as the source of info - I've not got any photos of a real one unfortunately. If anything is in the wrong place, please tell me, however I may go "la la la not listening" if it's a major issue!

 

D154-5.jpg.f35903d80c5c67a7a556bdb2fceb66c9.jpg

 

D154-6.jpg.df4c13d4da40a86de7ec8108d93aee73.jpg

 

D154-7.jpg.8f99a8dd6d4bacb00a64d99c00406248.jpg

 

Spotted when taking the last photo - the right hand bogie is wonky. I shall have to investigate!

A very productive day indeed sir! :good_mini:

I don't get that much done in a typical day... :rolleyes:

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8 hours ago, Woodcock29 said:

As I said earlier, yesterday we had a showing of a new exhibition layout called Spirsby built here in Adelaide by my mate Gavin. He has built the layout and I have supplied all the stock plus the GN somersault signals, signal box (still to be completed),  yard crane and 3-D printed GN station fence posts and seats. Whilst there are some details to be finished off on the layout its mostly finished.  The track plan is based on that on the ordinance survey plan. Its a country branch terminus to fiddle yard L shaped layout. To give the yard operator something more to do a loco depot has been built adjacent to the storage sidings. Here are a few photos. Some of the locos and a lot of the goods stock still need weathering.

 

In the background of some of the photos you can also see glimpses of Gavin's Great Moor Street layout.

Andrew

Good work chaps. Look forward to seeing it next year.

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1 hour ago, Bucoops said:

 

I think I got about a month's work done!

 

Good evening Bucoops,

 

The thread zips around so much, it is easy to get distracted from what is often the most interesting bits, such as your 'shortie' BG. I'm finding your modeling of great interest and look forwards to seeing more as it develops. Not being very clued up on the prototype, I can't wait to find out more about it.

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Hi Terry (Manna).

The current plan is to have it at the Exhibition next June all being well. By the way, I'm going to Pichi Richi for first weekend of Oct with my wife's cousin again so plan on calling in to deliver those Kirk coaches I have for you on Friday, 2 Oct. Will arrange time by email.

Andrew

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15 hours ago, richard i said:

Two months a long process! Come to pre grouping, I have spent a 8 months just cutting out the pieces to make 4 carriages. The build then followed. 18 months from start to finish. 
richard

post-9767-0-64433600-1350292649_thumb.jpgpost-9767-0-46966300-1499720130_thumb.jpg

Going back to the cabin, this was the finished model with a picture of the original and my sketches before I started building. The cabin was demolished c1968.

The model is about 36mm wide excluding the oil cupboard

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4 hours ago, Theakerr said:

Woodcock29, Love the pictures of Firsby, fairly familiar with the area as my first wife (deceased) came from Louth and we did a lot of our courting in that general area finding the one (front) room pubs.  In your pictures I see a LNER J11, I also see that it has a vacuum brake but it does not have a vacuum ejector pipe.  I posted a comment a couple of pages back about discovering that both my Little Engines J11s did not have a vacuum ejector pipe and that I would probably have to fit one.  I am sort of hoping that you can tell me something i have missed and I do not have to fit them.  Thanks

Hi Theakerr

Whilst there was a Bachmann J11 standing either in the the loco yard or on a train in the storage sidings on Spirsby, mainly as a back up loco, its not really visible in any of the photos I posted so its curious that you think you saw it?  The only 0-6-0 seen clearly in any of the photos is a kit bashed J3 which of course doesn't have a visible vacuum ejector pipe as its under the boiler cladding. Anyway the J11 does have vacuum ejector pipe above the handrail on the right hand side.

Andrew

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Andrew the layout and stock are looking brilliant. I look forward to seeing them in a years time rather at the end of this month. Gavin and your production rate is very high. The advantages of being retired I guess. I hope to have the 2 x V2's for you to have a look at next year! 

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