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13 hours ago, Chuffer Davies said:

Hi Pete, yep I was wrong.  I’d not been aware of the SEF kit so by default if it wasn’t an LRM model I had assumed it must be a Craftsman model. So many choices.  But for me there is something about the quality of the LRM kit that sets it apart from the others.  I might have a go at modifying an LRM kit to produce a round cornered tank version. I wonder what other material differences there were between the square and round cornered prototype C12s? 
Frank

 

I am currently test building a round tank version if the C12 in brass.

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6 hours ago, MJI said:

Curving carriage sides.

 

I will have a few I need to the same profile, Basically late Swindon, so flat upper and curved bottoms. Used on both GWR stock and BR DMUs.

 

Doing it with nothing more than some form of roller and mat is not good, not happy with the DMU side curves, not bag, just not good enough for me as it took ages for a slightly wobbly look.

 

So there are rolling bars, and presses.

 

I am thinking of making a wood former for the outside, glue strips on fill and sand, and a press former to go into it.

 

Then squash it!

 

Firstly, will this work.

Secondly, do I need to go tighter or will as needed be correct.

 

You would be in good company using skirting board. That was how Roy Jackson did his. I can't recall the full details but he had a home made bending jig which had a second bit of wood fixed along the length which made sure the top edge was parallel. It may even have acted as a holding clamp but it is ages since I saw it and can't remember.

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1 hour ago, t-b-g said:

 

You would be in good company using skirting board. That was how Roy Jackson did his. I can't recall the full details but he had a home made bending jig which had a second bit of wood fixed along the length which made sure the top edge was parallel. It may even have acted as a holding clamp but it is ages since I saw it and can't remember.

 

55 minutes ago, MJI said:

Great so my wood idea will work.

 

I can stand on it I suppose to press it.

It's a long while since I did any (in the days before Comet sides came pre-formed), so I might have forgotten some details, but I used a second piece of wood to hold the side to the skirting board, the edge of the second piece being where the curve started. Sticky tape was handy to keep the bits in place at this stage. I clamped the whole lot up in the Workmate so that it was gripped along its length. Then I took a third piece of wood, longer than the side, and ran it back and forth along the side, applying gentle pressure, until I'd got the curve I wanted.

 

I found that skirting board with a quarter-round profile at the top was easier to use than the stuff with a sharp angle half way down, if you can picture what I mean.

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Hullo, Tony!

 

I hope you are doing alright during these harsh, unfair, uncompromising, trying and difficult times. Also, I have been at work on several projects myself:

 

*Retro-style models in celebration of Hornby's Centenary Year (or whatever's left of it)

*Pre-Grouping Vintage Trains (which I started in late-2016/early-to-mid-2017 prior to joining this website)

*Taking modern-day train companies and giving them the Steam-era (mostly Pre-Grouping) treatment

 

What do you think of these ideas?

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9 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

 

It's a long while since I did any (in the days before Comet sides came pre-formed),

Comet sides were pre-formed in a fly press. I was allowed to do a few myself under close supervision from Geoff.

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11 minutes ago, 96701 said:

Comet sides were pre-formed in a fly press. I was allowed to do a few myself under close supervision from Geoff.

Understood, Phil. I was talking about the early days when they were supplied flat and you had to form them yourself.

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1 minute ago, St Enodoc said:

Understood, Phil. I was talking about the early days when they were supplied flat and you had to form them yourself.

I seem to recall that they bought the fly press to prevent those who are unable to bend coach sides from complaining and asking for refunds / replacements......

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11 minutes ago, 96701 said:

I seem to recall that they bought the fly press to prevent those who are unable to bend coach sides from complaining and asking for refunds / replacements......

 

 

This is why I want to make a Swindon profile set, will suit a number of vehicles I need, from a GWR designed non corridor to a 120 Cross Country DMU.

 

I reckon 12 sides will be enough.

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12 hours ago, LNWR18901910 said:

Hullo, Tony!

 

I hope you are doing alright during these harsh, unfair, uncompromising, trying and difficult times. Also, I have been at work on several projects myself:

 

*Retro-style models in celebration of Hornby's Centenary Year (or whatever's left of it)

*Pre-Grouping Vintage Trains (which I started in late-2016/early-to-mid-2017 prior to joining this website)

*Taking modern-day train companies and giving them the Steam-era (mostly Pre-Grouping) treatment

 

What do you think of these ideas?

Very interesting.

 

I'm sure we'll all like to see the results. 

 

When you say 'modern-day train companies', it'll be the liveries you're altering? In this respect, it's a pity the current LNER Azumas weren't tried out in apple green (in the way the GWR ones carry a form of dark green). It would be amusing to see a model of one in light green.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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3 hours ago, 96701 said:

I seem to recall that they bought the fly press to prevent those who are unable to bend coach sides from complaining and asking for refunds / replacements......

They did Phil,

 

And I had the use of it before Dave Lewis bought his own.

 

The problem was/is that the press produces just one profile (most-suited to LMS types if memory serves). For, say, Mk.1s, the higher sides have to be curved as well; with great care, so as not to produces creases at the windows. 

 

That said, it's far better to have sides pre-formed. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

 

The sharp-eyed will note I've moved the front steps a bit further forward than prototypical. Set-back, they fouled the pony wheels, even on 3' radius curves. An acceptable compromise? 

 

 

Maybe more a practical workable compromise?

 

 

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6 hours ago, Jesse Sim said:

LB has many modellers work, from signals, track and buildings. So I thought I’d like to build you something from one friend to another, as you have helped me enormously these past few years. I’m really getting the hang of building wagons, well I think I am and it was the least I could do. 

I’ve helped on Grantham, the station canopy brackets and now I have a small slice of my work on LB, the two layouts that have meant a lot to me. LB since I was a teenager and Grantham since the March edition of BRM in 2014, which inspired me to go LNER.

 

Enough of my waffle, it’s a whitemetal NER open from Wizards. 
 

I just hope it runs..... 

'I just hope it runs.....'

 

It does: beautifully!

 

Best regards and many thanks again,

 

Tony.  

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Good day Tony,

 

Sorry to interupt the flow.

 

Just had a look at the Virtual Show and Little Bytham. It is a really outstanding achievement Tony, you must have worked so well as a team to create such a great piece of work. The loco's and rolling stock all first class with a totally correct sideways "shudder" on some of the head on shots.

 

I was particularly taken with the appearance of 46245 City of London pulling, what I assume to be, the Home Counties Railway Society trip to Doncaster Works and Shed on June 9th 1963? I was on that trip with my late brother and Father and it is still such a vivid memory. I remember my brother "cabbing" Mallard and Willbrook I still have the pictures somewhere. It was our last trip out together before I started work at Eastleigh Works on September 2nd.

 

Thanks.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

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3 hours ago, 30368 said:

Good day Tony,

 

Sorry to interupt the flow.

 

Just had a look at the Virtual Show and Little Bytham. It is a really outstanding achievement Tony, you must have worked so well as a team to create such a great piece of work. The loco's and rolling stock all first class with a totally correct sideways "shudder" on some of the head on shots.

 

I was particularly taken with the appearance of 46245 City of London pulling, what I assume to be, the Home Counties Railway Society trip to Doncaster Works and Shed on June 9th 1963? I was on that trip with my late brother and Father and it is still such a vivid memory. I remember my brother "cabbing" Mallard and Willbrook I still have the pictures somewhere. It was our last trip out together before I started work at Eastleigh Works on September 2nd.

 

Thanks.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

Thanks Richard,

 

The whole virtual show seems to be going well.

 

I think the principal reason why the LB team worked so well was the common goal. In a way, there was no 'democracy' involved. By that I mean that the layout was to be very site-specific and time-specific (the latter, perhaps, a bit flexible?). No matter what the principal interests each team member had with regard to his/her railway allegiances, what they built was for an ECML actual location at a particular time.

 

We all had our own roles as well, with some overlap (mine being to build most of the locos and passenger rolling stock, plus some scenic/architectural work). It's an immense privilege to be part of such a team.

 

With regard to 46245; I claim complete self-indulgence. As you correctly suggest, it is on the Home Counties trip to Doncaster and return (nearly four years after the station was demolished!), though its train should really have a Gresley catering car in it. For 'filming' purposes, it's the 'Talisman' rake (which also appears both A1- and A4-hauled as well). By all accounts, the run was a bit of a disappointment; any hope of a 100 mph dash down from Stoke on the return journey was dashed by a crawl through Grantham. 

 

I built 46245 from a DJH kit and Geoff Haynes painted her.................

 

763595382_DJHSemi25onlayout.jpg.a51f1ed66c84e2a7dbb19b05868329f6.jpg

 

Here she is on the northbound run.

 

1688353117_DJHSemi27onlayoutpanning.jpg.041fa7edf60ec6b7e455f31d574ae676.jpg

 

Going very well!

 

569318478_08Semi46245.jpg.af01adbd5dceaef7d41984f6315dd4d5.jpg

 

And on the return journey.

 

692432733_Shap21646245atSummit02.jpg.d0e49edc4d30c2be875e2a91e54cc017.jpg

 

Though I built CITY OF LONDON for Little Bytham, she's (naturally) far more at home on the WCML, and here the big 'Semi' is running on Shap. Had it not been for Covid, she'd have run a lot more on Shap. Perhaps in the future, Graham? 

 

Returning to the virtual show, any further comments, from anyone, please? Bouquets and brickbats accepted with equal relish..................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Returning to the virtual show, any further comments, from anyone, please? Bouquets and brickbats accepted with equal relish..................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

 

 

Just bought yet another Bachmann diesel - the show special D5146, which was a must given this photo in my collection:

 

2168696245_8bbe71f7a1_c.jpgD5146_Derby_17-3-68 by Robert Carroll, on Flickr

 

I also watched the Retford sequence. I think it really shows what an incredible achievement the layout was for Roy and the 'Mob'. I even saw one of my sets of stock that is now on the layout, along with an A1 (60156) that I sold to Sandra, via Tony. Sandra re-gauged it to EM. It now has a fitting home. What also struck me was the progress that has already been made since that footage was shot. Sandra has been adding more engines to the fleet. I have reshuffled some stock to improve the formations and various details have been added by Sandra, Tony and me. A few carriages in the sequence have been withdrawn from service too, albeit only temporarily in some cases. Lots more to do, Covid permitting.

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44 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Returning to the virtual show, any further comments, from anyone, please? Bouquets and brickbats accepted with equal relish..................

 

 

Like Robert, I just watched both the LB and Retford sequences and each illustrate the respective layout superbly. As you know, I am pretty familiar with LB, but having visited Retford only once, it brought back to me just what an epic project this has been and how worthwhie it will be to get it finished.

The variety of trains plus the quality of running on LB was superb as ever!

 

Tony

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8 minutes ago, 2750Papyrus said:

Thoroughly enjoyed the LB and Retford sequences, also the servicing tutorial!

 

Some impressive signals on Retford - who built  them?

Tony Gee is probably best placed to answer your question.............

 

However, most have been built by Rick Hunt, Martin Lloyd, Mick Nicholson and Mick Moore. Apologies for missing anyone off that list.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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5 minutes ago, 2750Papyrus said:

Thoroughly enjoyed the LB and Retford sequences, also the servicing tutorial!

 

Some impressive signals on Retford - who built  them?

 

At least 7 different people did work on the above baseboard parts and several others contributed to the technical side, sorting out wiring and servos. I would add Andrew Hartshorne, John Phillips and myself to those who did some of the above baseboard bits and several others helped with the wiring and setting up the servos. I would say that Mick Moore, Rick Hunt and Martin Lloyd did the bulk of the fancy, impressive signalling, others played a supporting role, perhaps providing perhaps one signal, or in the case of Andrew, the exquisite ground discs.

 

It is a lot of names to remember and if I have forgotten any, I apologise!

 

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