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12 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

I wouldn't like to say never but hardly ever, at least in the classic NER form. There were coal drops at various places such as the Cambridge St wharf on the Regents Canal but those were set up for tipping wagons. On the other hand, the standard Midland opens used for mineral traffic and a great many PO wagons running on the Midland system had bottom doors, so there must have been places where they were needed. Possibly, now I come to think of it, the south London coal depots.

 

As for propping up the door: http://www.midlandrailwaystudycentre.org.uk/catimages/28926.jpg.

 

 

There were coal drops at Kentish Town that were certainly approached by viaduct. Unfortunately, I've only seen them in ruined form.

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1 hour ago, LNER4479 said:

Well done Jesse, on having constructed your first loco that runs; may it be the first of many.

 

It took me three goes before I got my first one to run anything like reliably. For me, that was over 35 years ago and even now, there is sense of both wonder and smugness the first time a new loco runs. There is no feeling quite like it (in the railway modelling world)

 

Good on yer, mate! You've pushed yourself beyond your capabilities - and found your capabilities are greater as a result. Now crack on with the next one and consolidate the achievement.

'there is sense of both wonder and smugness the first time a new loco runs. There is no feeling quite like it (in the railway modelling world)'

 

There is indeed Graham, and I couldn't agree more. 

 

In a way (slightly perversely?), that's why I'll build things like A4s rather than rely on RTR products. They might well have 'accuracy' issues in comparison, but nothing beats that feeling of having made something (which works) by oneself. 

 

What Jesse is doing is terrific. He's casting off the 'shackles' of RTR-reliance (not that there's an RTR J6) and the world of making model locomotives will become his oyster. 

 

Last night proved to me (smugly!) why I build my own locos. I set the unpainted 60013 (she's now got a fallplate and cab doors) on to a heavy express rake on Little Bytham, opened the taps and just watched it whirl round at over 90. I left the controller on 'auto' and scrambled to the 'far side', just to watch it bowl by, taking some moving footage at the same time (which I'll send to someone who can put it on here). 

 

I know some of the above might seem 'elitist', because I acknowledge that not all can successfully build complex loco kits, but (despite detail anomalies?) my own-build A4s will always be more important to me than a product produced by a far-away factory, excellent though it might be. 

 

A personal point of view, of course.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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On 23/11/2020 at 15:16, Headstock said:

Isn't RM web a wonderful resource for the production and acquisition of new kits. I've sourced four this year and now have a small get to work pile.


Following on from the previous dia. 113 build, comes this dia. 45 BG kit from Ian Macdonald.

Looks another fantastic kit there, it’s really handy to get access to one off kits like these via the forum.

I’ve really enjoyed building Ian’s O33 siphon kit over the past week, the end result being a lot more detailed than the old TPO kits that make up the rest of the formation.  Does rather set you on a very slippery slope once you add one coach which is that much more detailed than everything else.  

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13 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

 Possibly, now I come to think of it, the south London coal depots.

 

 

 

A complex subject, with depots owned by the MR, as well as the GNR and the LNWR.  I'm a South Western man, so this information may be wrong but here goes: 

Wandsworth - don't know

Brixton - don't know

Elephant - yes

Peckham Rye (joint with LNWR) - no

Brockley (on Greenwich branch, opp GNR) - doubt it

West Kensington - don't know.

 

Someone else help please, does Unravelled read this thread?

Bill

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1 hour ago, gr.king said:

 

Hello Chas,

 

Nice. We should see more vintage LNER models on here. Did you find that the roof edge actually managed to form a neat, closed joint to the tops of the sides when merely clipped in as supplied? I had to use additional persuasion when building my six-wheelers.

My main concern about the tension lock coupling (if you need one of that width) would be that it sticks out way beyond the buffer heads. Is there a way to reduce the projection until it is just enough to prevent problems with buffers on your track curves?

The cornice / gutter strip on the roof edge ought to be varnished wood colour...

 

I superglued the original Mainline/Bachmann type couplings to the bogie stretchers on my build, such that the bar is in line with the buffers.

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1 hour ago, Woodcock29 said:

Jesse

I'd be interested to see what the other two chimneys look like. Perhaps you could take a photo of them tomorrow?

 

The chimney for 1930s should be almost 2ft tall, ie 8mm. The one you have fitted does look a bit tall to me.  Looking closer I can also see that the two safety valves I queried are in fact whistle castings as Tony G has indicated.

 

Andrew

One was shorter and fatter and the other was almost the same size as the one that’s on it. Like I said looking at the photo it seemed to be the correct one..... I’ll take some photos tomorrow if the chimneys and post them. I can change it if it is wrong. 
 

yeah they defo are whistles.... rookie mistake 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

'there is sense of both wonder and smugness the first time a new loco runs. There is no feeling quite like it (in the railway modelling world)'

 

There is indeed Graham, and I couldn't agree more. 

 

In a way (slightly perversely?), that's why I'll build things like A4s rather than rely on RTR products. They might well have 'accuracy' issues in comparison, but nothing beats that feeling of having made something (which works) by oneself. 

 

What Jesse is doing is terrific. He's casting off the 'shackles' of RTR-reliance (not that there's an RTR J6) and the world of making model locomotives will become his oyster. 

 

Last night proved to me (smugly!) why I build my own locos. I set the unpainted 60013 (she's now got a fallplate and cab doors) on to a heavy express rake on Little Bytham, opened the taps and just watched it whirl round at over 90. I left the controller on 'auto' and scrambled to the 'far side', just to watch it bowl by, taking some moving footage at the same time (which I'll send to someone who can put it on here). 

 

I know some of the above might seem 'elitist', because I acknowledge that not all can successfully build complex loco kits, but (despite detail anomalies?) my own-build A4s will always be more important to me than a product produced by a far-away factory, excellent though it might be. 

 

A personal point of view, of course.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

It really is a great feeling! 
 

The J10 I had that feeling but it was only a change of wheels, motor and paint, but the J6 had me sitting there going “F**k yeah” multiple times. Haha 

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2 hours ago, bbishop said:

 

A complex subject, with depots owned by the MR, as well as the GNR and the LNWR.  I'm a South Western man, so this information may be wrong but here goes: 

Wandsworth - don't know

Brixton - don't know

Elephant - yes

Peckham Rye (joint with LNWR) - no

Brockley (on Greenwich branch, opp GNR) - doubt it

West Kensington - don't know.

 

Someone else help please, does Unravelled read this thread?

Bill

I would say that the answer is yes and no depending on the location and the amount of traffic. Obviously in an arecof high land prices and where the geography  was favourable coal drops made sense. I've memories of seeing photos of them in South London and possibly St Pancras area. However in more rural areas then a ground level yard would be normal with the side door about level with the floor of a horse drawn coal cart.

 

Jamie

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2 hours ago, bbishop said:

 

A complex subject, with depots owned by the MR, as well as the GNR and the LNWR.  I'm a South Western man, so this information may be wrong but here goes: 

Wandsworth - don't know

Brixton - don't know

Elephant - yes

Peckham Rye (joint with LNWR) - no

Brockley (on Greenwich branch, opp GNR) - doubt it

West Kensington - don't know.

 

Someone else help please, does Unravelled read this thread?

Bill

 

@bbishop, there have been a couple of topics on cross-London services over the last year or so:

 

 

For the Midland side of things, the map at the right hand end of this strip map gives the locations and routes to the Midland's coal depots and goods stations south of the river [Midland Railway Study Centre Item 20628].

 

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46 minutes ago, jamie92208 said:

I would say that the answer is yes and no depending on the location and the amount of traffic. Obviously in an arecof high land prices and where the geography  was favourable coal drops made sense. I've memories of seeing photos of them in South London and possibly St Pancras area. However in more rural areas then a ground level yard would be normal with the side door about level with the floor of a horse drawn coal cart.

 

Jamie

There were a number of locations where topography played its part. Coal drops were extant at Welwyn North where the land profile and restricted station are north of the viaduct resulted in their use. The core structure is still there.

CB36308A-FD53-4CE2-B7EA-C0E8B08EAA2B.jpeg.ed7b800bbdea266e8410f10114be8689.jpeg

When Chris Matthewman took Strove out many didn’t believe the GE had drops, so he used to take a GE society magazine with him, to show the heretics!

Edited by PMP
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7 hours ago, gr.king said:

 

Hello Chas,

 

Nice. We should see more vintage LNER models on here. Did you find that the roof edge actually managed to form a neat, closed joint to the tops of the sides when merely clipped in as supplied? I had to use additional persuasion when building my six-wheelers.

My main concern about the tension lock coupling (if you need one of that width) would be that it sticks out way beyond the buffer heads. Is there a way to reduce the projection until it is just enough to prevent problems with buffers on your track curves?

The cornice / gutter strip on the roof edge ought to be varnished wood colour...

Hello Graeme, thank you for the feedback. The roof edge formed a pretty neat joint for most of the length but it does curl up a small amount as it approaches two of the end corners. However, this wasn't apparent until after it was clipped into place and I'm nervous of breaking this resin material (having discovered how easy it is to do) so I'm not very inclined to try removing it. It doesn't curve up enough to show a gap, just that the last little bit is not quite so straight. Neither of the photos I've posted here is a straight-on enough view to show it properly and in reality it's not too intrusive, especially when viewed from my usual 'helicopter' layout perspective.

What was the 'additional persuasion' you used? That phrase conjures up bright lights and veiled threats - I hope no-one was injured? :lol: I wonder if the longer length of this coach - compared to your six-wheelers - with its greater number of fixing points helps to give a better join?

(Actually, I have the same thing with a 6 wheel ECJS Luggage Brake built from one of Mike Trice's 3D printed kits, where the roof has a similar slight end bow. They're the only two kits I've built that weren't either metal or the kind of fairly rigid and tough plastic used in Airfix type kits: is it correct to refer to that as injection moulded plastic, or is there a more correct way of distinguishing it from the resin and 3D printing materials?)

You're right about the couplings: I do leave them sticking out a little farther than many do, because my layout has rather tight curves, but I must agree on further looking here that I may have erred on the side of caution, even for me! No way to alter them now I'm afraid - if it were a brass bogie it should be possible to remove sections cleanly, and re-solder or even glue, but the sort of surgery required here would I'm quite sure leave me holding a handful of bits. Actually, it won't be alone - there are a couple of other builds where I had no choice but to position the tension locks further out than would be ideal, because of other underframe or bogie structures, and I don't find it bothers me too much when they're running with other stock.

Same with the coupling width: using the narrower couplings sometimes leads to derailments so I tend to stick with Medium for coaches. I've clearly developed CBS (Coupling Blindness Syndrome) as I rarely notice them. (In much the same way, as far as I'm concerned I still have a full head of hair and a flat stomach:boast:).

As to the cornice / gutter strip, thank you for pointing that out: from somewhere I'd got the idea that was only the case pre-grouping and that those edges were white too (when freshly shopped) by LNER days, but having just checked some photos more carefully I realise I've got that very wrong! At least that's fairly easily correctable and will be done asap!

Edited by Chas Levin
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10 minutes ago, bbishop said:

My howler, in that the siding opposite the GNR Brockley Lane coal yard was a private siding not a coal yard.  But Brixton was drops and Wandsworth probably  wasn't.  Bill

 

Brixton coal depot was at Popes Road (by Brixton Station) with elevated sidings: http://www.urban75.org/blog/lost-scenes-of-brixton-the-coal-depot-at-popes-road/

 

Peckham was similar although I believe the wagons were hoisted down from the elevated lines. I understand they are proposing a 'coal line' to be built on the disused coal sidings alongside the railway line, through the heart of Peckham. https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/regeneration/funding-opportunities/crowdfunding-pilot-programme/peckham-coal-line-urban

 

 

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21 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good evening Sandra,

 

I think SPARROW HAWK has a Trix body; as does MERLIN and MALLARD (though where 60022 is now, I don't know). 

 

Whichever A4 bodies Roy might have used, as runners (with his mechanisms) they'll be superb (which surprises me when you say 60018 derails). 

 

I'll have a go at making and fitting an EM Gauge chassis underneath one of my SEF A4s, and, when restrictions are lifted, we can see how it looks (and performs) on Retford. I doubt if there'll be any problems with haulage capacity...............

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I might just have put a curse on 60018. The bogie derailed on the first point coming into the down GN fiddleyard if routed into any road other than number 1, where the first and only point encountered is taking the straight road for road 1 and the curve for all others. The tender then jumped off on the diamonds at the north end of the station on the down line.

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Nice Gas works. Don't forget the pipework, miles of it, and loads of grot & stink.

 

Wigan Gasworks, just after closure, and about to be demolished, 1973 as the O/H masts can just be seen in Wigan NW station. That's the town centre in the background, very close.

 

2013-01-25-14-28-39.jpg.3094e8482fe6707d80d9751d0da01422.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-02-53.jpg.67ae683acda1d2761be5e88d07d2120a.jpg2013-01-25-15-03-08.jpg.e851b7d8d3cd281a665ee5bf1e4da7f8.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-05-33.jpg.411e430aa661b2deab595ca076d40e13.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-06-48.jpg.71b0ea632c8ea0bd2ba0a8fe558d1655.jpg

 

2013-01-25-14-39-43.jpg.ffd817b8ee4488a0332b685617bec744.jpg

 

Don't add much grass - very little in / around a gas works - weeds are ok, just about clinging to life though !!!

 

I did my first day at work here in 1969 just before it closed.  The place certainly had "atmosphere" !!

 

Brit15

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Regarding the chimneys for the J6 these are the other two that came with the kit, I think the one I have chosen is correct for the loco I’m basing it on. 

 

Also, are they the sniffing valves? That’s the only thing that’s left in the kit. 

2E2B8AFF-AA43-4AC7-B34F-8D72EBA91082.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Chas Levin said:

 The roof edge formed a pretty neat joint for most of the length but it does curl up a small amount as it approaches two of the end corners......

What was the 'additional persuasion' you used? That phrase conjures up bright lights and veiled threats - I hope no-one was injured? :lol: I wonder if the longer length of this coach - compared to your six-wheelers - with its greater number of fixing points helps to give a better join?

 

It was very fortunate that I built my vehicles including a modification that allowed me to separate the body from the floor, giving access to the interior at any desired time. That makes it easier and less nerve-wracking to unclip the roof in a controlled and non-destructive way, by squeezing the gutters from the outside, levering gently at the clips from inside, and working a lever or spacer into the joint from the outside, starting at one end of one side and working along the body.

I found that even after carefully filing just the irregularities off the raw printed shapes of the top of the side and the under-edge of the roof, ensuring that they could meet "flush", the clips simply weren't enough to nip the gap down tightly. In at least one case the roof was also showing the "raised ends and low middle" tendency, although I had carefully removed anything from the tops of the body ends that might push the roof ends up. Manipulating the roof to a "corrected" shape after softening in hot water and then "setting" the shape in cold water failed to overcome the difficulties.

I resorted to using some chunky square-bar plastic (5 or 6mm section I think) stuck to the underside of the roof along its centre line to resist any sagging, and added plastic shim pieces to the bar so that it sat in contact with the tops of the compartment partitions too, ensuring that the roof couldn't possibly sink in the middle. I then held the edges down and very carefully super-glued them to the tops of the sides - after fitting the glazing in its slots of course!

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1 hour ago, APOLLO said:

Nice Gas works. Don't forget the pipework, miles of it, and loads of grot & stink.

 

Wigan Gasworks, just after closure, and about to be demolished, 1973 as the O/H masts can just be seen in Wigan NW station. That's the town centre in the background, very close.

 

2013-01-25-14-28-39.jpg.3094e8482fe6707d80d9751d0da01422.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-02-53.jpg.67ae683acda1d2761be5e88d07d2120a.jpg2013-01-25-15-03-08.jpg.e851b7d8d3cd281a665ee5bf1e4da7f8.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-05-33.jpg.411e430aa661b2deab595ca076d40e13.jpg

 

2013-01-25-15-06-48.jpg.71b0ea632c8ea0bd2ba0a8fe558d1655.jpg

 

2013-01-25-14-39-43.jpg.ffd817b8ee4488a0332b685617bec744.jpg

 

Don't add much grass - very little in / around a gas works - weeds are ok, just about clinging to life though !!!

 

I did my first day at work here in 1969 just before it closed.  The place certainly had "atmosphere" !!

 

Brit15

 

Thanks.

 

It's no longer a gas works as the modelled period is after the retort houses and other production buildings were knocked down with a large school (the regional training centre), van and lorry petrol/diesel station and staff car park built on it, so is termed a gasholder station.

 

map-gasworks-630.jpg.3fa0476f71d840781bd9e40c924fd7f9.jpg

 

My model is only based on it but as can be seen from the plan above is just the front main road entrance. The modelled section is very small part of it and the site went back behind the backscene long way with three more holders (one has already gone on the plan above) and all the large pipes around where the distributing engineers department (DED) was located. In fact the works site went back further to include the area marked as industrial estate up to Verney Road which was where the canal ran and west back to the Old Kent Road. On the corner at the Old Kent Road was the Livesey institute for the workers where you could have a game of snooker and couple of beers at lunchtime. It was quicker to walk there along the Old Kent Road. The institute was still there when I first went there in the mid 70s but was later sold  and knocked down. They made a replacement bar above the canteen just behind the second largest holder.

 

Nonetheless I have included a little of the large diameter holder supply pipework but it's difficult to see:

 

DSC00675red.jpg.8a3530691e9d475e607b6ece1df9ab83.jpg

 

and, of course, other grot and pipework still to be made and included. I certainly recall the smell as we had to walk around between the holders to get to the site canteen. There was a little grass, a triangle in front of the district and area offices where there was a statue of George Livesey, engineer, industrialist and philanthropist: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Livesey

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Jesse Sim said:

Regarding the chimneys for the J6 these are the other two that came with the kit, I think the one I have chosen is correct for the loco I’m basing it on. 

 

Also, are they the sniffing valves? That’s the only thing that’s left in the kit. 

2E2B8AFF-AA43-4AC7-B34F-8D72EBA91082.jpeg

Hi Jesse,

that other casting looks like the fire door handle to me.  

Frank

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After coal carbonisation ended in the late 60's / early 70's most former gasworks became "Holder Stations", as the gas holders were already in place, as well as the associated pressure management equipment, and of course the low and medium pressure gas mains radiated out from them to supply local districts. In the 60's lots of new high pressure welded steel Natural Gas mains were laid to inter connect such locations. A rather complicated subject.

 

As far as model railways go, Grahames model & proposals are very realistic. Many former Gas Works sites became  holders with a pressure reduction compound (more pipework !!), some were also local depots for distribution / service etc (cue gas vans, offices, stacks of yellow plastic pipe awaiting laying). Lots of modelling potential even up to the present day.

 

Most (if not all) holders have now gone. Expensive to maintain and getting life expired they have been replaced by storing high pressure gas in the actual underground grid pipelines, new interconnections etc - all unseen and un-modelable. Even the super dooper ultra modern (well in the 70's) LNG (liquid natural gas) plants are / have gone (Partington Manchester in particular - this was rail connected with some LNG rail traffic up to the 80's). 

 

As to overhead pipes - don't worry about which pipe goes where - many's the time in my career I have gazed at such pipes, modification plans in hand, muttering "where the hell does that pipe go !!!!!!!

 

Peter Denny with his Buckingham layouts had a gas works at every station, and made a mighty fine job of them he did - if a tad too neat and tidy !!!

 

Brit15

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2 hours ago, Jesse Sim said:

Regarding the chimneys for the J6 these are the other two that came with the kit, I think the one I have chosen is correct for the loco I’m basing it on. 

 

Also, are they the sniffing valves? That’s the only thing that’s left in the kit. 

Edited by Chuffer Davies
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37 minutes ago, APOLLO said:

After coal carbonisation ended in the late 60's / early 70's most former gasworks became "Holder Stations", as the gas holders were already in place, as well as the associated pressure management equipment, and of course the low and medium pressure gas mains radiated out from them to supply local districts. In the 60's lots of new high pressure welded steel Natural Gas mains were laid to inter connect such locations. A rather complicated subject.

 

As far as model railways go, Grahames model & proposals are very realistic. Many former Gas Works sites became  holders with a pressure reduction compound (more pipework !!), some were also local depots for distribution / service etc (cue gas vans, offices, stacks of yellow plastic pipe awaiting laying). Lots of modelling potential even up to the present day.

 

Most (if not all) holders have now gone. Expensive to maintain and getting life expired they have been replaced by storing high pressure gas in the actual underground grid pipelines, new interconnections etc - all unseen and un-modelable. Even the super dooper ultra modern (well in the 70's) LNG (liquid natural gas) plants are / have gone (Partington Manchester in particular - this was rail connected with some LNG rail traffic up to the 80's). 

 

As to overhead pipes - don't worry about which pipe goes where - many's the time in my career I have gazed at such pipes, modification plans in hand, muttering "where the hell does that pipe go !!!!!!!

 

Peter Denny with his Buckingham layouts had a gas works at every station, and made a mighty fine job of them he did - if a tad too neat and tidy !!!

 

Brit15

 

Don't forget that in 1907 the gasworks were still pretty new and hadn't had time to deteriorate.

 

429292447_IMG_0513copy.JPG.7d177e712a1aa953cb3cfb1c144dd018.JPG

 

1048120468_IMG_0524copy.JPG.2331bb74135124a4a815700cd4734863.JPG

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1 hour ago, APOLLO said:

 

Most (if not all) holders have now gone. Expensive to maintain and getting life expired they have been replaced by storing high pressure gas in the actual underground grid pipelines, new interconnections etc - all unseen and un-modelable. Even the super dooper ultra modern (well in the 70's) LNG (liquid natural gas) plants are / have gone (Partington Manchester in particular - this was rail connected with some LNG rail traffic up to the 80's). 

 

As to overhead pipes - don't worry about which pipe goes where - many's the time in my career I have gazed at such pipes, modification plans in hand, muttering "where the hell does that pipe go !!!!!!!

 

 

Here's a bit more gas about the industry, that might help with modelling.

 

The late 60s/early 70s was a busy and hugely changing time for the gas industry with 'conversion' - the need to visit all homes with a gas supply to check and convert the appliances to burn natural gas - and the closure of towns gas works. The huge works at East Greenwich continued to produce a gas known as SNG (synthetic natural gas) which was stored in huge cylinders lying on their sides and one of the workers managed to build himself a concrete ocean going yacht there which had to be craned out of the works and on to the Thames. That'd make an interesting modelled scene - a concrete yacht in a gas works

 

There were often huge diameter pipes that, as well as not seeming to go anywhere, didn't even appear connected to anything. There seemed to be a lot at Aylestone Road, Leicester site (from what I remember when I worked/visited there) as well as here at Battersea:

 

27883149_Battersealatticeholder.jpg.20ba147d8fcc677835d302a847f2f855.jpg

 

Although many holders are now dismantled some have been protected by being listed. The one (No.13) at the Old Kent Road, although decommissioned, is grade II listed as it was once was the largest in the world. It was built in 1879-81, was 160ft tall with a diameter of over 210ft, could hold 5.5m cubic feet of gas and had 22 wrought iron standards (columns).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Jesse Sim said:

Regarding the chimneys for the J6 these are the other two that came with the kit, I think the one I have chosen is correct for the loco I’m basing it on. 

 

Also, are they the sniffing valves? That’s the only thing that’s left in the kit. 

2E2B8AFF-AA43-4AC7-B34F-8D72EBA91082.jpeg

Thanks for posting this photo Jesse. You've already fitted the snifting valve behind the chimney in the photos of you model. Not sure what those other bits are on the w/m sprue. 

 

The taller chimney in this photo looks to me like its meant to be the version suited to most J6s through the 1920-30s but it doesn't look quite right perhaps its too fat? It is a built up chimney and should be 1' 11 1/4" tall (ie about 7.7 mm)  but to me looks too fat. The first 15 J6s, according to Yeadon, were built with plain cast chimneys with a deep cap and were 1' 11 7/8", so 5/8" taller - I suspect that is the chimney you have fitted to your J6 (so should be about 8 mm tall), although in the photo of you model it looks taller than that. These cast chimneys were replaced by the built up chimneys through the 1920s.  During WW2 the built up chimneys were replaced by cast chimneys 1' 7 1/2" tall (and slightly reduced cab height) to give wider route availability during WW2.

 

The LRM cast brass chimney is 7.2 mm and Graeme King's resin chimney is 7.6 mm so that is pretty close to what it should be for the 1920s-30s. I know we're talking fractions of a mm but when you look at the photos they seem taller than the information tells us so we don't want to be fitting chimney's that are too short in my view.  

 

The short chimney in the photo above is for the WW2 and later period. There are good sectioned drawings of the J6 chimneys in John Crawley' s The London and North Eastern Railway in Focus 2001.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Tony W  - I know it wasn't that long ago we had a debate on the j6 chimney here!

 

If only I could find the time to build my LRM and King J6s! Too many other modelling projects to do first! And in fact the King J6 was originally going to be converted to a J1 but now I hear that Frank Davies is doing an etched brass J1 for Clayton I think I'll wait and hopefully be able to get one from LRM in due course.

 

Andrew

 

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