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Wright writes.....


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18 hours ago, Beechnut said:

It’s getting worse but then that’s forums. I like it despite its faults.

 

Brendan

 

Brendan,

 

In no way was my post meant to be critical - I was merely trying to analyse why the two cab rooves did not line up.

 

Quite often, when one of my models doesn't look 'quite right', I will leave it on the test track where I look at it whenever I'm at my workbench.

 

That way, I will eventually decide what the problem is - or come to the conclusion that it is fine as it is.

 

John Isherwood.

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This might be of interest, or of particular use if you can't sleep!

 

It was shot about 11 years ago, and I'd quite forgotten about it (an Australian friend has just reminded me).

 

What it does prove is the incredible amount of progress made on LB during the last decade plus........................

 

 

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15 hours ago, queensquare said:

...my favourite class of loco..

 

Jerry

Mine too!

 

If we're showing S&D 7Fs, I have these six to build and the damaged one to repair.  They’re all eBay purchases and I don’t think I overpaid for any of them.  The damaged one has a Portescap and gearbox in it.

 

7Fs.jpg.b31ae109398109db598a510b41590305.jpg

 

I have also built a DJH 7F, my first ever loco build, and a Bachmann one packed away; so 9 of the 11. I’m keeping my eye out for a large boilered version.  All being well I’ll begin building these next year.

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

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17 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Look forward to seeing that - I've had one waiting to be built for over 20 years (so far).

If Tony doesn't mind a bit of GWR interloping I'll post updates as it progresses. I might actually get on with it then. I have one I built back in 1990 from the NuCast reissue of the old Cotswold kit. It runs well but has never to my mind quite captured the low look of the small wheeled panniers. Not the fault of the kit , more my inexperience, but the body sits a little high and there is something wrong around the cab area to my eyes.  Hopefully I'll make a better job of this one.

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2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

(snip)

 

Quite often, when one of my models doesn't look 'quite right', I will leave it on the test track where I look at it whenever I'm at my workbench.

(snip)

 

John Isherwood.

I use digital images in much the same way, both for layouts and ‘stock’. Having the image to hand on the moby makes the process easier and sometimes faster too.

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Re: The Summer of 76 and the Flying Scotsman and the Soup.

 

I got away from the factory early one Friday, and arrived at Newcastle Central in time to catch the (delayed) southbound Flying Scotsman service. There was room in the Dining Car, so I sat down for lunch. The train, I think it was hauled by a 47, was accelerating past Low Fell, when the brakes started to come on. This was just as the staff had started serving soup, and one very sensible attendant went down the aisle shouting 'Stand clear of your soup' (or words to that effect.). With the train juddering to an emergency stop anybody sat facing the direction of travel was likely to get their soup in their lap, and this did indeed happen to several people.

 

There was a general mopping up, and the train managed to set off again. Apparently the problem was on the locomotive and was the reason why the service was delayed in the first instance.

However, once the train was again travelling at speed and the soup being served, the same thing happened again. Again the message was passed 'Stand clear of your soup' and again one person was late to react and received a lapful of soup. I think he got a round of applause. I can't really remember what happened after that. I think we stopped for some time at Darlington where presumably the locomotive was changed.

 

Now, I do like facing the direction of travel, but I had opted for the prawn cocktail (it was the 70s after all).

 

Only once since then have i eaten soup on a train, and that was on the NYMR Dining Train a few years ago. I did enquire carefully about the health of the braking system before we set of!

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4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

This might be of interest, or of particular use if you can't sleep!

 

It was shot about 11 years ago, and I'd quite forgotten about it (an Australian friend has just reminded me).

 

What it does prove is the incredible amount of progress made on LB during the last decade plus........................

 

 

Hi Tony

 

I still have my DVD copy and look at it from time to time, very inspirational.

 

Thank you for producing it I did not realise it was produced 11 years ago, surely Tony it's about time for Part 2.

 

Regards

 

David

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I have succumbed to 'pressure'

 

The Ivatt 4MT now has brakes!

 

578919964_MillholmeFlyingPig11.jpg.da4a4342bb07d7e6516a82aaba17b5e6.jpg

 

They're moulded plastic ones (approximations). 

 

One other thing I've not long noticed is the AWS battery box. Yet, the loco has no bang plate behind the coupling, no conduit on this side and it's still got frame-mounted guard irons.

 

It's going back in its box! 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I have succumbed to 'pressure'

 

The Ivatt 4MT now has brakes!

 

578919964_MillholmeFlyingPig11.jpg.da4a4342bb07d7e6516a82aaba17b5e6.jpg

 

They're moulded plastic ones (approximations). 

 

One other thing I've not long noticed is the AWS battery box. Yet, the loco has no bang plate behind the coupling, no conduit on this side and it's still got frame-mounted guard irons.

 

It's going back in its box! 

 

 

 

That looks suitably "busy" underneath now! The balance weights will also make a huge difference when they are fitted.

 

Going back to the tender, it may be an optical illusion but it does look to me as if it is a bit lower at the front than it is at the back. I am wondering if the cab roof heights could be improved without messing up the buffer height by slightly lifting just the front end?

 

If I put a plastic rule along the footplate on my big computer screen, it does appear that the tender slopes but I accept that camera angles and lenses can create illusions like that.

 

 

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Tony this kind ribbing you have received has pushed you to improve your modelling and this model. I bet the next time you think " I'll just leave these off no one will say any thing.... oh the last time ummm... alright I'll finish it off properly " 

 

Merry Christmas to you and Mo, along with the rest of the readers and contributors.

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1 minute ago, t-b-g said:

 

That looks suitably "busy" underneath now! The balance weights will also make a huge difference when they are fitted.

 

Going back to the tender, it may be an optical illusion but it does look to me as if it is a bit lower at the front than it is at the back. I am wondering if the cab roof heights could be improved without messing up the buffer height by slightly lifting just the front end?

 

If I put a plastic rule along the footplate on my big computer screen, it does appear that the tender slopes but I accept that camera angles and lenses can create illusions like that.

 

 

Thanks Tony,

 

I think part of the illusion is that the tender is at a different angle to the loco. I should have made them both parallel.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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7 minutes ago, Nick Mitchell said:

Good evening,

I hope you don't mind me posting something a little off-piste here. I know the frequenters of this thread like seeing things that people have been making, so I thought I'd share a few pictures of a 2mm finescale locomotive I started during the first lockdown, and have just completed (apart from painting) - which is good going for me.

 

The loco in question is a little industrial Hunslet 16" 0-6-0 saddletank. It is going to be a "modern image" model of "Beatrice" as preserved in working order at Embsay railway where I volunteer as a fireman (hence the anomalies such as the steam heat pipes).

 

The basis of the model is a set of etches from Judith Edge, photographically reduced from their 4mm scale kit. Quite a few adaptations have been necessary to make the chassis work as a split-frame 2mm version. This has included extending the main frames to build an integral gearbox, and making the bottom half of the boiler part of the chassis.

 

There were no castings with the 2mm version of the kit, so the chimney, dome, safety valves, whistle, smokebox door and tank and sandbox filler lids are all my own turnings. The buffers have been adapted from some commercially available turned brass offerings. I also needed to scratch-build a some of the other details, like the representation of the weigh-shaft and balance weight, plus the tops of the slide-bars and piston rods / trunk guides between the frames, and also the back-head detail.

 

Parts of the chassis had to be painted at the construction stage so that I could line the frames(!!) before fitting the wheels. The top half of the model will be heading into the paint shop next week.

 

Some general shots:

 

20201223_173231.jpg.a99722f07ba742d0a1a759e5aefd5f4e.jpg

 

20201223_173314.jpg.f22be263a1f1a74cb94fa5457ed09e53.jpg

 

The motor is a Chinese 7mm coreless affair, similar to the ones Graham Farish currently use in their N Gauge locos. Gears and wheels are from the 2mm Scale Association.

Most of the mechanism is hidden, though the gears protrude slightly into the bottom of the cab.

A tiny CTElektronik DCC decoder (I'll wash my mouth out later, Tony!) fits into the top of the tank, and I even managed to squeeze in a couple of 330uF stay alive capacitors. These stick up into the bunker. This sort of electrickery really helps with the reliability of virtually weightless 2mm tank engines.

 

IMG_1034.JPG.829228d82617ce3d02aca39c123412b9.jpg.a015366128959542f79b70fcaa4221d6.jpg

 

IMG_1035.JPG.e42288b4a0e4eb286b4897208dab7237.jpg.b3b2bc76a8d76763e4fddae796d63266.jpg

 

In this next shot you can see where I've had to cut a slot in the firebox to accommodate the end of the worm. A well-placed driver and fireman should disguise it.

You can also see that I have lost the guard iron from the back of the frame. This will be replaced before I do the final bits of painting on the chassis. I also need to add sand boxes and delivery pipes, but these will be painted off the model and glued on.

 

20201223_172727.jpg.dd12072f5383fd4236fabc09bed472cc.jpg

 

I toyed with the idea of using human hair for the whistle cord, but mine isn't long enough. In the end I used 0.15mm phosphor bronze. I think it looks about right, and it certainly solders more easily than hair...

 

20201223_172906.jpg.e6a66e1595d7fc0e378074f197923e19.jpg

 

Finally, the obligatory coin of the realm, to prove how really tiny this model is.

 

20201223_174742.jpg.a1e7db14bbd86c24f7d85f30e5edf5b9.jpg

 

Happy Christmas one and all!

Nick.

20201223_172631.jpg

It's wonderful to have your work grace these pages, Nick.

 

Thanks for showing us. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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11 hours ago, t-b-g said:

 

That looks suitably "busy" underneath now! The balance weights will also make a huge difference when they are fitted.

 

Going back to the tender, it may be an optical illusion but it does look to me as if it is a bit lower at the front than it is at the back. I am wondering if the cab roof heights could be improved without messing up the buffer height by slightly lifting just the front end?

 

If I put a plastic rule along the footplate on my big computer screen, it does appear that the tender slopes but I accept that camera angles and lenses can create illusions like that.

 

 

Why not just put a full load of coal in the tender and say its down on the springs because of the extra weight

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11 hours ago, Nick Mitchell said:

Good evening,

I hope you don't mind me posting something a little off-piste here. I know the frequenters of this thread like seeing things that people have been making, so I thought I'd share a few pictures of a 2mm finescale locomotive I started during the first lockdown, and have just completed (apart from painting) - which is good going for me.

 

The loco in question is a little industrial Hunslet 16" 0-6-0 saddletank. It is going to be a "modern image" model of "Beatrice" as preserved in working order at Embsay railway where I volunteer as a fireman (hence the anomalies such as the steam heat pipes).

 

The basis of the model is a set of etches from Judith Edge, photographically reduced from their 4mm scale kit. Quite a few adaptations have been necessary to make the chassis work as a split-frame 2mm version. This has included extending the main frames to build an integral gearbox, and making the bottom half of the boiler part of the chassis.

 

There were no castings with the 2mm version of the kit, so the chimney, dome, safety valves, whistle, smokebox door and tank and sandbox filler lids are all my own turnings. The buffers have been adapted from some commercially available turned brass offerings. I also needed to scratch-build a some of the other details, like the representation of the weigh-shaft and balance weight, plus the tops of the slide-bars and piston rods / trunk guides between the frames, and also the back-head detail.

 

Parts of the chassis had to be painted at the construction stage so that I could line the frames(!!) before fitting the wheels. The top half of the model will be heading into the paint shop next week.

 

Some general shots:

 

20201223_173231.jpg.a99722f07ba742d0a1a759e5aefd5f4e.jpg

 

20201223_173314.jpg.f22be263a1f1a74cb94fa5457ed09e53.jpg

 

The motor is a Chinese 7mm coreless affair, similar to the ones Graham Farish currently use in their N Gauge locos. Gears and wheels are from the 2mm Scale Association.

Most of the mechanism is hidden, though the gears protrude slightly into the bottom of the cab.

A tiny CTElektronik DCC decoder (I'll wash my mouth out later, Tony!) fits into the top of the tank, and I even managed to squeeze in a couple of 330uF stay alive capacitors. These stick up into the bunker. This sort of electrickery really helps with the reliability of virtually weightless 2mm tank engines.

 

IMG_1034.JPG.829228d82617ce3d02aca39c123412b9.jpg.a015366128959542f79b70fcaa4221d6.jpg

 

IMG_1035.JPG.e42288b4a0e4eb286b4897208dab7237.jpg.b3b2bc76a8d76763e4fddae796d63266.jpg

 

In this next shot you can see where I've had to cut a slot in the firebox to accommodate the end of the worm. A well-placed driver and fireman should disguise it.

You can also see that I have lost the guard iron from the back of the frame. This will be replaced before I do the final bits of painting on the chassis. I also need to add sand boxes and delivery pipes, but these will be painted off the model and glued on.

 

20201223_172727.jpg.dd12072f5383fd4236fabc09bed472cc.jpg

 

I toyed with the idea of using human hair for the whistle cord, but mine isn't long enough. In the end I used 0.15mm phosphor bronze. I think it looks about right, and it certainly solders more easily than hair...

 

20201223_172906.jpg.e6a66e1595d7fc0e378074f197923e19.jpg

 

Finally, the obligatory coin of the realm, to prove how really tiny this model is.

 

20201223_174742.jpg.a1e7db14bbd86c24f7d85f30e5edf5b9.jpg

 

Happy Christmas one and all!

Nick.

20201223_172631.jpg

 

How on earth.........?

 

Assuming that this isn’t deepfakery, this is stunning work.  Absolutely stunning.  :O

 

You must have incredible patience and fine motor skills.  I can’t even work with 4mm scale hand holds without them ‘pinging’ all over my workbench and beyond!

 

Phil

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3 hours ago, gregpokes1/Camden said:

I haven't done work to any of my OO collection in what must be months, if not over a year.  This week, I decided to have my hand at truly renovating the Hornby A4 (which, in my personal opinion, is due for a retool anyway).  The valve gear was from a donor Bachmann A1, yes you read that correctly.  I rather like the look of the A1 gear on this loco as it looks far more prototypical than the cheap Hornby stuff they stick on.  She's been renumbered/renamed from Hornby's 60031 'Golden Plover' to 60017 'Silver Fox.'  Lots of work still to be done on the tender. It needs cab doors and a new insert, as the inside is lacking loads of ribbing, bracing, and riveting.  The drain cocks were made from scratch using fine copper wire and the lubrication decorative linkage needed replacing so I took it upon myself to make it from scratch.  I hope everyone is having a wonderfully happy Christmas thus far this year given the circumstances.   

image.png

image.png

image.png

image.png

The valve gear is a huge improvement.

 

Thanks for showing us.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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9 hours ago, Nick Mitchell said:

While I'm in the neighbourhood, so to speak, I'll take the opportunity to bring you up to speed with progress on a loco that has appeared on this thread before.

It is more than 3 years since I visited Little Bytham, when Tony took some lovely photos of a few of my locos (see this post).

One of those locos was an ex-LNWR 0-6-2 Coal Tank, built from etches shot down to 2mm from the London Road Models kit. Rather like the Hunslet 16" (see above) there was a lot of fiddling about required. These "shot-down" etches are closer to scratch-aids in many ways than kits in the traditional sense, as many of the ideas about how they should be built don't scale very well.

 

Anyway, after an embarrassingly long time, earlier this year (before I made a start on the Hunslet) I finally finished off all the detailing on the Coal Tank and painted it. For a Victorian locomotive, there is a surprising amount of fiddly little detail which all needed to be fabricated from lumps of brass and bits of wire. I had started off with several commercial castings for the boiler furniture and tool-boxes, but they were all grossly over scale, so I ended up re-making most of them. The splasher-top sand-boxes are all that remain, considerably diminished. Here is the complete loco prior to painting:

 

IMG_0381.JPG.d5a69567b8b099ade63890ed329477c4.jpg.253deaaa76edd8fa52f850adbc3b695c.jpg

 

IMG_0378.JPG.b3ec0f9154a1ab1f2022fff12a28b88f.jpg.91fa7a5f4c5bea7fe2ba916052562325.jpg

 

With the cab roof off, it is easier to see the detailed interior (as well as the back end of the motor). The bunker contains stay-alive capacitors.

 

IMG_0388.JPG.0c9ae8a1edb1f7af7eaaaad0d1a629e8.jpg.59cf709c22404189c9a13356f587b799.jpg

 

The decoder itself is concealed within the ash-pan. At the left had end of the picture below is the rear truck, which is a genuine radial truck, rather than a pony truck as provided for in the original kit (and which couldn't be made to work in a 2mm context).

 

905540741_steps3.jpg.d9f01e4cf8d72b11f381ae3604d8f48e.jpg.2de2617490c018e47cfd6220b460abd9.jpg

 

The body has been painted (Precision 2-pack etch primer, then Humbrol gloss black, both airbrushed) and had Fox transfers applied. A nice easy livery!

 

IMG_0701.JPG.6c9738b5e4e100b295ce09cc5de3fe9d.jpg.7b99906cc2cbe423147e0e7005ef2604.jpg

 

IMG_0700.JPG.76df04ea1cf32000424c4e77648c38a6.jpg.3ce2c54fc5959805b98e0a5791435e53.jpg

 

When I get the airbrush out next week to start painting the Hunslet, this loco will be weathered.

Nick.

 

Just when I think I have the skill and ability to build a half decent loco, somebody comes along and shows me that I still have much to learn!

 

Modelling like that makes me (and probably others too) think "Must try harder".

 

Some people get almost put off when they see models like that. Not me. When I see what others have done, it just makes me think that if they can do it, I can have a go too.

 

Super stuff and truly inspirational.

 

Tony Gee

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9 hours ago, Nick Mitchell said:

While I'm in the neighbourhood, so to speak, I'll take the opportunity to bring you up to speed with progress on a loco that has appeared on this thread before.

It is more than 3 years since I visited Little Bytham, when Tony took some lovely photos of a few of my locos (see this post).

One of those locos was an ex-LNWR 0-6-2 Coal Tank, built from etches shot down to 2mm from the London Road Models kit. Rather like the Hunslet 16" (see above) there was a lot of fiddling about required. These "shot-down" etches are closer to scratch-aids in many ways than kits in the traditional sense, as many of the ideas about how they should be built don't scale very well.

 

Anyway, after an embarrassingly long time, earlier this year (before I made a start on the Hunslet) I finally finished off all the detailing on the Coal Tank and painted it. For a Victorian locomotive, there is a surprising amount of fiddly little detail which all needed to be fabricated from lumps of brass and bits of wire. I had started off with several commercial castings for the boiler furniture and tool-boxes, but they were all grossly over scale, so I ended up re-making most of them. The splasher-top sand-boxes are all that remain, considerably diminished. Here is the complete loco prior to painting:

 

IMG_0381.JPG.d5a69567b8b099ade63890ed329477c4.jpg.253deaaa76edd8fa52f850adbc3b695c.jpg

 

IMG_0378.JPG.b3ec0f9154a1ab1f2022fff12a28b88f.jpg.91fa7a5f4c5bea7fe2ba916052562325.jpg

 

With the cab roof off, it is easier to see the detailed interior (as well as the back end of the motor). The bunker contains stay-alive capacitors.

 

IMG_0388.JPG.0c9ae8a1edb1f7af7eaaaad0d1a629e8.jpg.59cf709c22404189c9a13356f587b799.jpg

 

The decoder itself is concealed within the ash-pan. At the left had end of the picture below is the rear truck, which is a genuine radial truck, rather than a pony truck as provided for in the original kit (and which couldn't be made to work in a 2mm context).

 

905540741_steps3.jpg.d9f01e4cf8d72b11f381ae3604d8f48e.jpg.2de2617490c018e47cfd6220b460abd9.jpg

 

The body has been painted (Precision 2-pack etch primer, then Humbrol gloss black, both airbrushed) and had Fox transfers applied. A nice easy livery!

 

IMG_0701.JPG.6c9738b5e4e100b295ce09cc5de3fe9d.jpg.7b99906cc2cbe423147e0e7005ef2604.jpg

 

IMG_0700.JPG.76df04ea1cf32000424c4e77648c38a6.jpg.3ce2c54fc5959805b98e0a5791435e53.jpg

 

When I get the airbrush out next week to start painting the Hunslet, this loco will be weathered.

Nick.

Exquisite

 

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