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57 minutes ago, SD85 said:

From Wikipedia: "On 26 June 1967, [rebuilt MN] 35003 Royal Mail recorded the highest speed ever for the class. Hauling a train comprising three carriages and two parcels vans (164 tons tare, 180 tons gross) between Weymouth and Waterloo, the mile between milepost 38 and milepost 37 (located between Winchfield and Fleet) was covered in 34 seconds, a speed of 105.88 mph."

 

The Wikipedia writer needs a lesson in uncertainty and significant figures. As that time is given to the nearest second, the uncertainty in the speed is +/-1.5 mph, so there is no way five significant figures is justified. Charles Rous Marten, 70 years earlier, was timing trains with a stopwatch with a resolution of 0.2 seconds; even with that, assuming the time was 34.0 s to the nearest 0.2s, we would have to say +/-0.3 mph. So if quoting the speed without the uncertainty, one would have to call it 106 mph.

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2 hours ago, Northmoor said:

There is a Defence Standard test which had to be applied to a operator's console in a military helicopter I was involved in testing.  It requires the console to continue to work when tea, coffee or orange juice is spilled over it and I seem to remember the test specification defines the number of sugars in the tea

And of course the very worst and probably most frequent "foreign" contaminant endured by military equipment in use?   

Carbonated drinks (probably out of a red coloured tin or bottle).

 

Alan

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8 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I think it's accepted that steam locos needed (need) more time out of service for maintenance, but what's not always remembered is that they would keep going in such a bad state of repair, whereas alternative (more modern) motive power would fail totally if left to get in such a condition.

 

Was it Adrian Vaughan (a WR signalman) who wrote that a 'Hymek' failed by his 'box one day because the driver had knocked a cup of sweet tea over on the console, and the subsequent sticky residue had insulated some of the contacts?

 

Expanding on the subject, I think the 'pinnacle' of post-War A4 running was non-stop  'Elizabethan' where the standard of reliability was incredibly high. Granted, the individual locos only worked for six and a half hours in 24, but it was continuous. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

Urghhhhh

 

Sugar in tea

 

Yuk!

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I used to know someone who worked on the customer helpline at Olivetti back in the 1980s. They often received calls from people who had knocked over cups of tea or coffee and it had gone into the keyboard. The first question to ask was 'Do you take sugar?' which callers thought was a joke, but it wasn't. No sugar and it would be fine once it's dried out, sugar and it would mean a new keyboard.

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10 hours ago, Northmoor said:

There is a Defence Standard test which had to be applied to a operator's console in a military helicopter I was involved in testing.  It requires the console to continue to work when tea, coffee or orange juice is spilled over it and I seem to remember the test specification defines the number of sugars in the tea.  We did joke with the pilots that the test really should consider the impact of spilling their Gin and Tonic.

 

Rob

Standard NATO = milk and two sugars as I recall.

 

This also reminds me of the new CO whose adjutant brought him his tea and asked if he took sugar.

 

"No, thanks".

 

"Well don't bl00dy stir it then".

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

On the one I made, I didn't leave a gap between the filled-in coal rails on the tender and the tender tank top. Have I got that wrong?

I suspect not!

 

The little tags are quite fragile and one or two have got disturbed during painting and lining. With the toolboxes in their alternative position on my tender, it's almost impossible to get at them to adjust or refix.

 

I'm reminded that you fitted the older style chimney and dome on 4327. That's OK as there's a mix of types in photos on the superheated locos. I deliberately fitted the more modern (ha!) chimney on mine so should be a nice contrast between the two locos. Some also acquired mechanical lubricators when superheated and I have depicted this on No.3050, as you have on 4327.

 

I see Ian went the whole hog and lined the tender frames. I drew the line (ha!) at that!

 

With Frank's lovely J also out-shopped it's turned into a bit of a GNR evening.

Edited by LNER4479
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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I've finished the renumbering/renaming/detailing of the latest Hornby A2/3, changing it from 60512 to 60519 (one of two which retained a rimmed chimney all their lives). It's going to a Scottish friend..................

 

1344904987_HornbyA236051211now60519.jpg.0f1abdac230c447d1d6aa7cb8773a6a9.jpg

 

Next it's going to get a coat of satin varnish (to 'lift the green), then light weathering, both courtesy of Geoff Haynes. 

 

It'll form part of a forthcoming article in BRM. 

 

Looks great, would the Hornby 'Sun Castle' be simple enough to convert to 'Dante'?

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7 hours ago, Chuffer Davies said:

At long last I have been able to undertake final assembly of one of my Covid lockdown projects.   Design started in January 2021 and was for me my most difficult project to date because of its curved footplate.  Main features are EM gauge, Ultrascale wheels, American pickup, motor-in-tender drive system, and CSB suspension.  The tender is the LRM Horseshoe tender.  

 

My thanks must go to Ian Rathbone for the superb painting and lining.  And yes I have glazed the spectacle plates Tony.  Lamps will have to wait until we know what train it will be rostered to haul on Clayton.

 

Four other loco's were returned along with the J1 and so there will be further updates in due course.IMG_3554.jpg.cf8fb5ea19992480b795d940141f22e2.jpg      

A simple 'like' response is not enough.

 

I suppose I could have clapped hands.....................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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6 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

I suspect not!

 

The little tags are quite fragile and one or two have got disturbed during painting and lining. With the toolboxes in their alternative position on my tender, it's almost impossible to get at them to adjust or refix.

 

I'm reminded that you fitted the older style chimney and dome on 4327. That's OK as there's a mix of types in photos on the superheated locos. I deliberately fitted the more modern (ha!) chimney on mine so should be a nice contrast between the two locos. Some also acquired mechanical lubricators when superheated and I have depicted this on No.3050, as you have on 4327.

 

I see Ian went the whole hog and lined the tender frames. I drew the line (ha!) at that!

 

With Frank's lovely J also out-shopped it's turned into a bit of a GNR evening.

But at least you painted all the lines elsewhere - indeed, the whole thing.

 

This is where I find myself in a personal paradox. I can build to a standard which I find 'acceptable', but I can't paint to that same standard. All right, yes, if it's just plain black, and weathered, but the likes of a fully-lined LNER black D2? No! 

 

I keep on going on about folk doing things for themselves, but I know my own painting limitations.

 

In fairness to the likes of myself (Frank, though he's more fastidious?), if 'our' painting isn't up to the standard of 'our' building, then a model goes to the likes of Ian Rathbone. Anyway, when I built to a 'professional' standard, the client expected a 'professional' paint finish. 

 

It's just that I greatly-admire those who are self-reliant in all aspects of their modelling.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Shaw_Thing_M8 said:

 

Looks great, would the Hornby 'Sun Castle' be simple enough to convert to 'Dante'?

Very simple.

 

Just renumber and rename; nothing else needs altering for a later period A2/3 (not the latest, with lowered front lamp bracket and divided cross rail on the smokebox door). 

 

The only two you couldn't alter SUN CASTLE to are CHAMOSSAIRE and HONEYWAY; not without changing the chimneys, because both those retained a rimmed type to withdrawal (don't believe everything one reads in the 'established' works). 60514 also had extended sandbox filler backing plates. 60500 could only be represented post-'61/'62 because the boiler cladding bands were different. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Edited by Tony Wright
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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

But at least you painted all the lines elsewhere.

That's very kind but ... shh! Keep it to yourself - it's actually lining transfers.

 

Like you, I'm not so confident with painting and lining. This one's OK as it's mine (although it will appear at exhibitions I suppose) but the work of the likes of Ian is artistry I could never aspire to. And it's not like I haven't tried!

Edited by LNER4479
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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

 

 

I have a number of teak coaches to line fairly soon and I’m not sure that could be done by transfers - has anyone tried transfers on the beading?

 

 

 

Andy

 I tried lining Midland coaches with transfers and it did not work well.    I eventually got the verticals in place in straight lines but as soon as I tried to get the horizontals in place the verticals moved.  I suppose I could have varnished the verticals in before starting on the horizontals but I was already losing the will to live by this stage. 

 

Of course this is different to a teak where the lining is on the top of the beading rather than the side.  

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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

I find transfer lining works pretty well and is certainly neater than I could manage with a lining pen. This 0 Gauge N1 is my latest lining project. I bought it as a rather tired BR example, added the condensing pipes and repainted into LNER livery. The lining is with Fox transfers on Halfords’ gloss black with a matt automotive lacquer over the top.

 

4770251D-3909-439A-AA96-9AC29A28F9D0.jpeg.54469b442b4ae977acbe8ab4424af94f.jpeg

 

 

I did try bow pen lining once but with a rather old borrowed bow pen. I couldn’t get it too work at all. However I have a number of teak coaches to line fairly soon and I’m not sure that could be done by transfers - has anyone tried transfers on the beading?

 

I’m thinking I may have to take myself off to a lining course at Missenden as and when that’s allowed.

 

The N1 has now been posted off to TRS trains for fitting with synchronised smoke and sound. I have a sneaky suspicion  that ‘sir’ won’t approve!

 

Andy

That's lovely, Andy.

 

But I'm going to jump in before 'Sir' does - black buffer shanks? (easily 'sorted')

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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

I find transfer lining works pretty well and is certainly neater than I could manage with a lining pen. This 0 Gauge N1 is my latest lining project. I bought it as a rather tired BR example, added the condensing pipes and repainted into LNER livery. The lining is with Fox transfers on Halfords’ gloss black with a matt automotive lacquer over the top.

 

4770251D-3909-439A-AA96-9AC29A28F9D0.jpeg.54469b442b4ae977acbe8ab4424af94f.jpeg

 

 

I did try bow pen lining once but with a rather old borrowed bow pen. I couldn’t get it too work at all. However I have a number of teak coaches to line fairly soon and I’m not sure that could be done by transfers - has anyone tried transfers on the beading?

 

I’m thinking I may have to take myself off to a lining course at Missenden as and when that’s allowed.

 

The N1 has now been posted off to TRS trains for fitting with synchronised smoke and sound. I have a sneaky suspicion  that ‘sir’ won’t approve!

 

Andy

I don't disapprove at all Andy,

 

It's your money.

 

The N1 is beautifully-finished, though is the smokebox/boiler up at the front? It could be the camera angle but the top of the boiler appears not to be parallel with the top of the tanks.

 

I've looked at the spray lacquers at Halfords. Looking at what you've achieved, I'll give them a try.

 

Transfer lining on top of beading? Though I haven't tried it on teak, I've failed dismally with BR orange/black/orange (or gold/black/gold). It just won't 'wrap' around, because there isn't enough 'land' for it to adhere to. It just curls off! Thus, I fix it below the horizontal beading lines, which seems to work, even though it's incorrect.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, LNER4479 said:

That's lovely, Andy.

 

But I'm going to jump in before 'Sir' does - black buffer shanks? (easily 'sorted')

Ahh, I’m still getting used to LNER as opposed to BR colour schemes, not helped by predominantly black and white photos. This is a relic of the BR colour scheme I inherited and I didn’t think to check. Anyway, as you say easily sorted so thanks for the tip off.

 

Andy

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

I don't disapprove at all Andy,

 

It's your money.

 

The N1 is beautifully-finished, though is the smokebox/boiler up at the front? It could be the camera angle but the top of the boiler appears not to be parallel with the top of the tanks.

 

I've looked at the spray lacquers at Halfords. Looking at what you've achieved, I'll give them a try.

 

Transfer lining on top of beading? Though I haven't tried it on teak, I've failed dismally with BR orange/black/orange (or gold/black/gold). It just won't 'wrap' around, because there isn't enough 'land' for it to adhere to. It just curls off! Thus, I fix it below the horizontal beading lines, which seems to work, even though it's incorrect.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Thanks Tony,

 

I can’t check the boiler now as it’s gone off for smoke fitting as I said.  I suspect it will be on and off several times during that process fitting the steam reservoir so I’ll probably never know!

 

I’ve used the gloss lacquers for a while now on coaches but hadn’t tried the matt until this loco when my Testors Dullcote ran out and I couldn’t source any more online. I used this version.

 

CEC220D3-417B-4129-BB9F-12D1EF2F63E8.jpeg.0ffd00c09a2f72ce676343807d085940.jpeg
 

I sealed the transfers first with micro sol (don’t know whether that was necessary or not) and then sprayed with this. I’m pleased with the results and it’s a similar price to Dullcote for a much bigger can.

 

Andy

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1 hour ago, Andy Hayter said:

 I tried lining Midland coaches with transfers and it did not work well.    I eventually got the verticals in place in straight lines but as soon as I tried to get the horizontals in place the verticals moved.  I suppose I could have varnished the verticals in before starting on the horizontals but I was already losing the will to live by this stage. 

 

Of course this is different to a teak where the lining is on the top of the beading rather than the side.  

Yes, it’s the top of the beading which I think will be really difficult with transfers. Conversely I suppose it should make it easier to line with paint.

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4 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

Thanks Tony,

 

I can’t check the boiler now as it’s gone off for smoke fitting as I said.  I suspect it will be on and off several times during that process fitting the steam reservoir so I’ll probably never know!

 

I’ve used the gloss lacquers for a while now on coaches but hadn’t tried the matt until this loco when my Testors Dullcote ran out and I couldn’t source any more online. I used this version.

 

CEC220D3-417B-4129-BB9F-12D1EF2F63E8.jpeg.0ffd00c09a2f72ce676343807d085940.jpeg
 

I sealed the transfers first with micro sol (don’t know whether that was necessary or not) and then sprayed with this. I’m pleased with the results and it’s a similar price to Dullcote for a much bigger can.

 

Andy

Hi Andy,

 

I have used Halfords matt and satin lacquers over automotive paints and I always seal the transfers with B&Q water based satin varnish or the transfers curl up and dissolve. I found out the hard way that transfers and spray lacquers don't get along.

 

Gibbo.

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