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1 hour ago, Bernard Lamb said:

Good afternoon Tony,

While involved in wedding photography I came across a few people with a similarity to a few involved with model railways, particularly in respect of prices. Thy would not believe the cost of a wedding album. It was difficult to explain just how many hours it took to put an album together. If you did a proper job of it that is. I found getting the photographs taken and processed was the easy bit. 

In those days it was 3 rolls of film if using 6cm x 4.5cm and 4 if on 6cm x 6cm. 48 or 45 shots and it was bad form not to have 40 that were acceptable for the album. I used a Mamiya 645 and I don't know if I was lucky or if they were all like that, but I had a 45mm lens that was amazingly sharp with edge to edge crispness one stop down. Perfect in cramped situations. I had a C330 twin lens as a back up. Very good in the studio but cumbersome in the field. Digital is sooo much easier, though it took me several years to adopt the habit of taking more shots. 

I used the original Jessops  for supplies when they had a professional division and were based in Leicester.

Bernard

 

A mate and I once photographed a friend's wedding as they couldn't afford professionals, so asked if we'd do it (knowing we were keen amateurs) and we did a decent job (lucky with the weather but no squinting or lampposts growing out of heads etc.), and it only cost them the film plus developing costs.  A friendly Liverpool camera shop (remember those?) gave us guidance on the standard list of photos required of the couple and relatives etc. and we actually produced one or two really good shots amongst the "album", they were happy.  A work colleague and his wife, both keen amateur photographers, did the photos at my wedding and did a magnificent job.

 

I could never do it for a living though, the thought of messing up on someone's special day doesn't appeal.  I saw the photos from another friends' wedding and if they were mine I'd have sent them back.  It was the proverbial dull Autumn day but the photographer had photographed the groom and his brothers in their dark suits against a dark patch of trees in the garden, you couldn't pick out the edges of their clothing.  To me it seemed the "professional" was unprepared for the conditions and location, both of which she should have known in advance.

 

I agree about adapting to digital; I only stopped using my old 35mm cameras a few years ago and started with a digital SLR three years ago.  It is a revelation to be out all day and never to have to worry about changing films or the cost; remember when a 36 roll of good quality film (including processing) cost a tenner?

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Digital photography, lesson one, for those not yet converted: Be prepared. 35mm cameras went through film, digital ones go through batteries. 

 

Start the day with a fully charged one and always carry a spare. You may not need it, but having the gauge drop to one bar when unexpected interesting subjects crop up tends to limit ones enjoyment of the occasion somewhat. Same goes for memory cards, especially if you shoot video.

 

If you habitually review what you have taken; being able to is probably the biggest digital gain, after all. The live view screen (especially if articulated) is very convenient for tripod and chest/waist-level working, burst shooting combined with continuous/predictive autofocus for fast-moving objects, bracketing, HDR, even on-board stacking make DSLRs, CSCs, Bridge cameras and the more advanced compacts incredibly versatile but battery consumption is the price you pay for using the clever stuff.

 

I've never really got into shooting video but suspect that eats batteries as fast as it goes through memory.... 

 

Oh, and if you haven't needed the spare battery, put it in the camera when you take today's out to charge it, then if you forget to pick that up next morning, you will still have a working camera....

 

That last tip has saved me a day of lugging around something with all the functionality of a very expensive house-brick on more than one occasion....:jester:

 

John

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9 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

The 2P comes up smelling of roses, or something... it looks like a photograph. I'm afraid the Great Eastern engines just look a bit too smooth - clean without being polished. The B12 looks like a toy train, which it didn't, in colour.

Hi Stephen

 

Like you I am a lover of the products of Derby be they the artistic beauty of Johnson or the purposeful lines of the Deeley/Fowler era. I do have a soft spot for a GER 1500, I suppose living in Essex for 40years rubbed off on me in the end.

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2 hours ago, Northmoor said:

A mate and I once photographed a friend's wedding as they couldn't afford professionals, so asked if we'd do it (knowing we were keen amateurs) and we did a decent job (lucky with the weather but no squinting or lampposts growing out of heads etc.), and it only cost them the film plus developing costs.  A friendly Liverpool camera shop (remember those?) gave us guidance on the standard list of photos required of the couple and relatives etc. and we actually produced one or two really good shots amongst the "album", they were happy.  A work colleague and his wife, both keen amateur photographers, did the photos at my wedding and did a magnificent job.

 

I could never do it for a living though, the thought of messing up on someone's special day doesn't appeal.  I saw the photos from another friends' wedding and if they were mine I'd have sent them back.  It was the proverbial dull Autumn day but the photographer had photographed the groom and his brothers in their dark suits against a dark patch of trees in the garden, you couldn't pick out the edges of their clothing.  To me it seemed the "professional" was unprepared for the conditions and location, both of which she should have known in advance.

 

I agree about adapting to digital; I only stopped using my old 35mm cameras a few years ago and started with a digital SLR three years ago.  It is a revelation to be out all day and never to have to worry about changing films or the cost; remember when a 36 roll of good quality film (including processing) cost a tenner?

 

 

I went to a friends wedding  a few years ago and took my camera to take a few photos. As it was a waterfront wedding I took my 24-70 and 70-200 lenses so I could take a couple of coastal snaps. 30 minutes before the wedding the professional photographer called in sick. 

 

Guess who played fill in for the night?

 

The processing was never ending but they were delighted with the results.

 

Never again though and certainly not as a paying gig.

 

I like my photography and model making as hobbies!

 

Regards,

 

Craig W

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6 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I could never get into reading Thomas Hardy; just too depressing for me. 

 

One book I had to read for English Literature GCE O Level was Cranford, by Mrs Gaskell. No doubt it had merit, but any of those qualities just passed me by I'm afraid. I passed, despite finding the work incredibly boring, especially as H. G. Wells was also on the syllabus.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Good evening Tony, which H G Wells was it?

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Unfortunately there is a literary  Canon that sets these "classics" as part of the syllabus my son had an inspector calls in his English syllabus and that is as dull as ditchwater. 

We did Macbeth equally boring, to.kill a mockingbird and Friedrich which was about the holocaust and very moving.

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9 minutes ago, simontaylor484 said:

Unfortunately there is a literary  Canon that sets these "classics" as part of the syllabus my son had an inspector calls in his English syllabus and that is as dull as ditchwater. 

We did Macbeth equally boring, to.kill a mockingbird and Friedrich which was about the holocaust and very moving.

Well I studied three of those at GCSE and enjoyed all of them......  To Kill a Mockingbird is a literary masterpiece.  I think like with so many subjects, it takes a good teacher, mine was excellent (thank you Mrs G).  I didn't enjoy English at all until GCSE when our teacher brought the subject to life; she wanted me to do it to A-level but to be honest  I would have done even worse than the subjects I did take.

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Posted (edited)

I know there are a few pressfix users on here, do you get better results with press fix applying to a gloss surface or a mat one?

I have made a start applying transfers to my TPO, but I am having problems getting the backing off the lining on the recessed doors.  I know with waterslides a gloss finish is best (but I think that was just down to masking the carrier film).  I want to apply a satin coat to the coaches before I touch in the droplights / handrails (as I find acrylic on acrylic seems a little harder to remove mistakes than acrylic on enamel or on varnish)  

 

DFD6852F-D2C8-4CFB-BDD4-CD7D31A75A8E.jpeg.ed6b448965fe34bcbbdbc0749dcc9100.jpeg

Hammond L23, it still needs a comet underframe building as the current one (ex Lima siphon) rides too high on the Comet bogies.   I was trying to save a few pounds reusing something, but have thought better of it.  It will also still need all the various detail castings adding and a number

Edited by The Fatadder
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2 hours ago, Chas Levin said:

Good evening Tony, which H G Wells was it?

Good evening Chas,

 

Kipps. I would have preferred The Time Machine or the The War of the Worlds, but it was an engaging book. 

 

Regarding the last-mentioned, have you been to Woking? There are some splendid War of the Worlds creations there. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Chuffer Davies said:

... carrying amongst other things a consignment of newly manufactured ringers (as in hand cranked devices for squeezing water out of cloth).

 

As in wringers?

 

Love the Q2. I think they have a certain presence and not unpleasant on the eye, in my opinion. We have one available for use on Grantham (courtesy of Jonathan), technically a few years after the last was withdrawn for our timeframe but makes a nice change from the inevitable O4. It really ought to be a bit dirtier though (says he, throwing stones in his glass house...)

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1 hour ago, Chuffer Davies said:

Well here she is, number 2 of 5, and this time its my Q2.  Not the most elegant of Ivatt's designs in my view but certainly characterful.  These loco's were the regular motive power on the Queensbury Line for the weekly Keighley (pronounced Keithly) Ringer.  This was the nickname of a goods train departing the Keighley (GN) Goods Yard once a week carrying amongst other things a consignment of newly manufactured ringers (as in hand cranked devices for squeezing water out of cloth).

 

This model has the same credentials as the J1 shown a couple of days ago, but with the added challenge of working (?) valve gear between the very visible frames.  A challenge I don't think I'll be tempted to repeat if I make another.  Again my thanks to Ian R for the superb paint work.  Some will recall that this model was originally built with its motor in the firebox but despite pulling the long goods around Retford with ease, when it was tested out on the 1:50 gradient on the Clayton layout it was found wanting, failing with only 19 wagons behind it.   It was therefore rebuilt with its motor relocated to the tender and the space vacated filled with lead.  It will be May at the earliest before we can get access to the Clayton layout to establish just how big an improvement we've actually made.

IMG_3578.jpg.e1204b3ff0a3db7c47c521919210f0d3.jpg

This model is now available as an LRM kit.

 

A beautiful model Frank,

 

However, I think you're missing a silent 'W'.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Edit; 4479 beat me to it!

Edited by Tony Wright
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2 hours ago, MJI said:

Books at school. Who decided they were classics?

 

Much prefer a good well written SF book.

I remember sitting in the office in the 1970s reading a book by Michael Moorcock in my lunch hour. Elric was wielding his Stormbringer sword and stealing the souls of those that he killed during a huge battle, and the metal filing cabinets around me rattled. It took me a moment to realise that this was not an effect of the battle that I was reading about, but a minor earth tremor hitting Preston.

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2 hours ago, simontaylor484 said:

Unfortunately there is a literary  Canon that sets these "classics" as part of the syllabus my son had an inspector calls in his English syllabus and that is as dull as ditchwater. 

We did Macbeth equally boring, to.kill a mockingbird and Friedrich which was about the holocaust and very moving.

I beg to disagree.

 

An inspector Calls is one of the best works I've ever read (I think it was written as a play). Have you seen the Alistair Sim film of it? If not, you should.

 

As for Macbeth, that was the play in my English Literature O Level. Gripping! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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This evening's work has been concentrated on the donated J50.

 

2027399462_J5002.jpg.c648e3e9374b3c118cb4fb565bad3a60.jpg

 

The nature of the chassis dictated a huge amount of sideways slop in the axles. Rather than take off the wheels, the easiest dodge is to cut a nick out of a Peco fibre washer, just smaller than one eighth - then push it over the axle using tweezers, both sides. It won't come out. 

 

Pick-up pads installed.

 

728933106_J5003.jpg.016e7c7b52f2164f7d6da9ac7e69284c.jpg

 

.45mm nickel silver wire pick-ups installed (the drivers are all-insulated). 

 

I've also taken the feed nibs off this side of the footplate.

 

1580080329_J5004.jpg.3538924ea0662ac8983dbf5249e9c5e6.jpg

 

The dear old (actually, quite new) thing runs really beautifully.

 

I've tidied up the soldering (Gordon, if you're reading this, did you use a paste flux - Fluxite? A liquid phosphoric acid flux is much better). 

 

Shouldn't take too long to finish now, even though I've taken off the buffer beams; they were too far outboard. 

 

I really am astonished how altruistic most people are. The hobby is full of generous souls. Thanks again, Gordon. 

 

 

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I hated English Literature lessons with a passion. Dissecting Wuthering Heights or The Duel did absolutely nothing for me and often ended up in detention for not doing my homework, however reading a good book is a completely different thing.

 

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35 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

I think you're missing a silent 'W'.

 

Edit; 4479 beat me to it!

Doh!  Now I realise what was bothering me as I wrote it down. 

Edited by Chuffer Davies
Ambiguity.....
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Wow, Tony I didn’t expect so much to happen so quickly...:)

 

I’m chuckling to myself on several fronts with beginner errors. I originally had the buffer beams inboard and butting up the the footplate raised step underneath, but thought it looked wrong so moved them out.....:D

 

Had no idea the bumps down the footplate were feed nibs. Doh!

 

Yes, I did use fluxite. My father gave it to me when I was a youngster, so I guess it must be 60 years old, but I did spend ages washing it clean to remove traces of flux......Must have missed some.....;)

 

Great to see how you’ve done the pickups, as the DJH instructions had them fitted above the wheels, which to me was asking for trouble with shorts.

 

Very happy to hear it runs smoothly as it was run in for hours once I’d changed to plain crankpins and fitted a new set of rods. Judging by the weight of it, I would hope it will pull really well.

 

Edit: I had soldered the body screws in and just fitted the nuts for safekeeping. I now realise the circular cut out in the back of the chassis is to accommodate a lock nut on the back of the screw and strengthen it.  I must have missed that in the instructions, but guess years of experience mean you can almost forget the instruction sheet and just do it. I guess I’m the same making turnouts......;)

Edited by gordon s
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Having dyslexia I found the 26 symbols use to represent sounds very confusing. Not helped by being shy as small lad so reading in class was a dreaded experience. In turn this put me off reading unless I had to. Reading non fiction became easier as I went through school, mainly because the subject matter was full of facts which I absorbed like a sponge. Reading fiction was a chore, especially when it was a book we had to read. I think the only one I enjoyed at school was Kes as I could relate to the theme of the story. Macbeth, what a bore and what was Shakespeare on when he wrote it , David Copperfield scared me, one the story line and two how hard it was to read, another work we had to study was Under Milk Wood, sounded great when the teacher played the record of Richard Burton reading it, made no sense to me when I tried to read it.

 

I don't have a book phobia, as a teenager after school I would cycle to the town library and sit in the reference books section with my note book copying down information on artillery guns, tanks etc  some I can still remember. I still do not read fiction, but I really enjoy a good story when I hear a book being read on radio 4. 

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It's odd (though entirely natural, I suppose - is this a paradox?) how we react to our school memories - what we were told to do (today's children are requested ), which books to read and so on and so on. I found Macbeth gripping; there's murder, betrayal, treachery, the supernatural, madness, revenge and great sadness. A true tragedy (a word often used today to describe things like road accidents). What more could one ask for in a plot? Whatever the great bard 'was on', good!

 

My 'zeal' over 'correct' English (though I wish I could get my writing right all the time - there are probably errors in this post) probably stems from a time when I was ten years old, in junior school. Every Friday morning we had to speak out ten new words we'd learned in the week. That is, stand out in front of the class and recite the correct spelling. I failed on 'immediately'. Like all the other class members who 'failed', I was 'put to shame', given a few minutes to learn the word, then recite it again. Not only that, mumbling and the omission of consonants at the ends of words were not tolerated. Proper pronunciation was insisted upon (this is 1956, remember). Though the methodology employed might have crushed some others (no allowance seemed to be made for any, yet to be discovered, 'conditions'), it made me resolve never to be shamed again, and ever since then I've made it my task to expand my vocabulary at every opportunity. 

 

Can you imagine a teacher teaching that way today? He'd/she'd be sacked, the children probably given 'expert' counselling, to eventually become journalists/presenters, happily mangling our wonderful mother tongue. What was it the other day, watching the cricket? 'I'm sat here with Ebony'. Groan. And that from a university-educated commentator. He could never have been in the class of Miss Williams! 

 

 

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I had to learn Macbeth, Henry V and St Joan  at school.

As our daughter had a cesarean  section birth my wife is not too keen on me quoting a certain passage from The Scottish Play.

Bernard 

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My English Literature ‘O’ level study books were Shakespeare’s Henry IV (part two); Chaucer’s Prologue and Thomas Hardy’s Short Stories.   Which says something about the school I attended!

 

I don’t remember anything about them at all, apart from finding all of them so tediously boring, and taught without any enthusiasm.  I went on to get the lowest grade possible (9) in English Literature, despite achieving a grade 1 in English Language.  And I left school determined to never read another old classic for the rest of my life.

 

Imagine my dismay when I saw the other books available on the exam paper such as Animal Farm, which I had read on my own initiative about a year earlier.  I really should have answered those questions instead.

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10 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good evening Chas,

 

Kipps. I would have preferred The Time Machine or the The War of the Worlds, but it was an engaging book. 

 

Regarding the last-mentioned, have you been to Woking? There are some splendid War of the Worlds creations there. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Good morning Tony, yes, I'd have felt similarly.

:offtopic: I'm a very enthusiastic Wells fan - I've read almost everything he wrote (and between fiction and non-fiction he wrote a surprisingly large amount!) but there are one or two of best-known and most popular of his novels that I find a little over sentimental. I think they - Kipps and Mr Polly, for instance - were perhaps better suited to the age in which they were written.

 

If you want a really good read - without the slightly saccharine feel of those two - I'd recommend a slightly less famous pair of his novels, Tono-Bungay (about the rise and fall of a patent medecine tycoon, but it stands up equally well in today's business world) and The New Machiavelli, which charts the personal and professional career of a politician - again, surprisingly little dated: political double-dealing, extra-marital scandal, corruption in high places - real quality never goes out of fashion :D.

 

No, I haven't been to Woking or seen anything Wells-related there: once we're able to run about outside again I'll investigate. My favourite of his science fiction books is The First Men In The Moon: did you ever read that?

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