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5 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

46204 always seemed to have been a dirty princess, didn't she?(!)

 

Best price is about £43 per coach. I'll leave you to do the rest of the maths ... they're already being advertised on Ebay

 

No doubt there's a point to be made there about the kit building alternative?

Thanks Graham,

 

Though Comet, no doubt, does the (basic) kits for all the cars, are the roofs with the trunking available? 

 

Years and years ago, I photographed several models of the pre-War prestige LMS trains for BRM, including the blue 'Coronation Scot' (they were photographed on Stoke Summit!). They belonged to Aidan Crowley and were all made/painted for him by Graham Varley. I can't remember how the roofs were made, but the set looked magnificent (the motive power was a K's streamlined 'Princess Coronation'; later replaced by the DJH version, of which I built the first production kit). 

 

I believe they've since been sold-on after Aidan switched to O Gauge. Does anyone know what happened to these rakes? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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24 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

I believe they've since been sold-on after Aidan switched to O Gauge.

 

Other than that they were sold on, no.   I enquired with Graham when Shap was under construction, but he didn't know where they'd gone.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

It could well be, Pete,

 

Though I'm still puzzled why Roy made a pair (or was making) of ex-'West Riding'/'Coronation' cars consisting of a brake end in conjunction with the restaurant/dining car. As far as I'm aware, these operated (virtually) exclusively in Scotland in BR days, one being part of the 'Aberdonian' consist between the Granite City and Edinburgh. None appears in any of my carriage working notices on the GN in the '50s.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I did wonder if it might have been to make use of the remaining pair of etches if Roy had to obtain the full set. If it had been another second/kitchen second twin, it would have made it easier to do the King's Cross-Glasgow set.

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3 hours ago, robertcwp said:

I did wonder if it might have been to make use of the remaining pair of etches if Roy had to obtain the full set. If it had been another second/kitchen second twin, it would have made it easier to do the King's Cross-Glasgow set.

Is there any evidence that the ex-streamlined brake/catering twins worked on the southern section of the ECML in BR days? There must have been occasions, surely?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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39 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Is there any evidence that the ex-streamlined brake/catering twins worked on the southern section of the ECML in BR days? There must have been occasions, surely?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I have not found any evidence of such workings.

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Tony (and other expert kit builders),

 

I have a couple of questions about the latest kit I am building. It is a NMRS (ex Meteor) kit for an O gauge C12. So far it has largely gone together quite easily. I have got this far over the weekend in about 6 hours work which is good going for me.

 

2154C2D4-BD16-4673-9918-C6401010502D.jpeg.808e58a6b77cdd4c5d572c51a2088e00.jpegThe chassis runs nicely. This was my first experience of using a Poppy wood tech loco box and it certainly seems to have helped get a smooth running chassis.

 

However, I am stuck on two issues. The first is how I get the motor to to fit through the footplate. As you can see from the photo below there is a lot of metal in the way where the motor should fit through. There are a few half etched lines but not enough to take the metal out. I am inclined to start cutting away to few up enough space but is there anything I should be aware of before I do so?

 

0A1F4096-EEAB-41ED-9C0C-800D494EEB95.jpeg.8244155729221cdfffe9e4d84a97f40e.jpeg
 

The second issue is with the cab roof. It came as a flat sheet including the sides and the instructions said to roll it round a 3/16” rod which I did. But I got the curve in slightly the wrong place and it was hard to get it to curve above the cab door recess. So after mucking around restraightening and persuading with pliers I have a cab which is (nearly) the right shape but with some horrid crease lines and plier marks in it as seen below.

 

4747B804-1EE2-4489-A627-3255572120B5.jpeg.fedde1ae8bfe880c7cdb7e846e5ccf8c.jpeg

 

I’m sure many people would say, bin it and start again. But that isn’t really an option as Graham Jones of NMRS was sadly a victim of Covid, so this kit is currently discontinued.

 

My inclination is to tin it with 145 solder and then use white metal solder to skim over the cab corners and file to shape. Does that sound like a reasonable idea and/or does anyone have a better suggestion?

 

Many thanks

 

Andy

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, thegreenhowards said:

Tony (and other expert kit builders),

 

I have a couple of questions about the latest kit I am building. It is a NMRS (ex Meteor) kit for an O gauge C12. So far it has largely gone together quite easily. I have got this far over the weekend in about 6 hours work which is good going for me.

 

2154C2D4-BD16-4673-9918-C6401010502D.jpeg.808e58a6b77cdd4c5d572c51a2088e00.jpegThe chassis runs nicely. This was my first experience of using a Poppy wood tech loco box and it certainly seems to have helped get a smooth running chassis.

 

However, I am stuck on two issues. The first is how I get the motor to to fit through the footplate. As you can see from the photo below there is a lot of metal in the way where the motor should fit through. There are a few half etched lines but not enough to take the metal out. I am inclined to start cutting away to few up enough space but is there anything I should be aware of before I do so?

 

0A1F4096-EEAB-41ED-9C0C-800D494EEB95.jpeg.8244155729221cdfffe9e4d84a97f40e.jpeg
 

The second issue is with the cab roof. It came as a flat sheet including the sides and the instructions said to roll it round a 3/16” rod which I did. But I got the curve in slightly the wrong place and it was hard to get it to curve above the cab door recess. So after mucking around restraightening and persuading with pliers I have a cab which is (nearly) the right shape but with some horrid crease lines and plier marks in it as seen below.

 

4747B804-1EE2-4489-A627-3255572120B5.jpeg.fedde1ae8bfe880c7cdb7e846e5ccf8c.jpeg

 

I’m sure many people would say, bin it and start again. But that isn’t really an option as Graham Jones of NMRS was sadly a victim of Covid, so this kit is currently discontinued.

 

My inclination is to tin it with 145 solder and then use white metal solder to skim over the cab corners and file to shape. Does that sound like a reasonable idea and/or does anyone have a better suggestion?

 

Many thanks

 

Andy

 

 

Good afternoon Andy,

 

Take the maximum measurement of the motor and then cut out what's needed from the footplate with a piercing saw, adding a mil' each side for good measure.

 

To prevent the saw from binding, in the past I've glued a piece of hardboard to the brass (with Evo-Stik), which can be removed with solvent later. It means you won't go through near as many blades.

 

As for the cab roof, did you use pliers with 'blind' jaws? It looks like you've used some with serrated jaws - better for gripping, but dreadful for leaving marks.

 

I take it you don't have rolling bars? It makes jobs such as this much easier. 

 

Your idea of using solder as a filler is probably best. In fact, you might have to deepen some of the marks to give a good 'key' for the solder.

 

The best of luck!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Edited by Tony Wright
typo error
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53 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Take the maximum measurement of the motor and then cut out what's needed from the footplate with a piercing saw, adding a mil' each side for goof measure.

Tony

 

Is goof measure the ki8nd of measuring that I would do?

 

Lloyd

Edited by FarrMan
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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Good afternoon Andy,

 

Take the maximum measurement of the motor and then cut out what's needed from the footplate with a piercing saw, adding a mil' each side for good measure.

 

To prevent the saw from binding, in the past I've glued a piece of hardboard to the brass (with Evo-Stik), which can be removed with solvent later. It means you won't go through near as many blades.

 

As for the cab roof, did you use pliers with 'blind' jaws? It looks like you've used some with serrated jaws - better for gripping, but dreadful for leaving marks.

 

I take it you don't have rolling bars? It makes jobs such as this much easier. 

 

Your idea of using solder as a filler is probably best. In fact, you might have to deepen some of the marks to give a good 'key' for the solder.

 

The best of luck!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Thanks Tony,

 

That makes sense on the motor. 
 

I don’t have bending bars. They seem very expensive for something I would only use occasionally. But if I write too many kits off then they may look like a better investment! The other bends have gone fine (tanks fronts/ bunker rear etc). I just got this one in the wrong place. I probably should invest in some blind pliers though!

 

Regards 

 

Andy

 

 

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1 hour ago, thegreenhowards said:

Thanks Tony,

 

That makes sense on the motor. 
 

I don’t have bending bars. They seem very expensive for something I would only use occasionally. But if I write too many kits off then they may look like a better investment! The other bends have gone fine (tanks fronts/ bunker rear etc). I just got this one in the wrong place. I probably should invest in some blind pliers though!

 

Regards 

 

Andy

 

 

My wife slightly dented her baby (MGTF) gentleman who came to look at the damage just got behind the dent and massaged it out. Use something solid but softer than the brass and take your time. You can still finish off with a filer of some type, but remember you will/may need to solder within the proximity  of the damaged area.

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2 hours ago, Pebbles said:

My wife slightly dented her baby (MGTF) gentleman who came to look at the damage just got behind the dent and massaged it out. Use something solid but softer than the brass and take your time. You can still finish off with a filer of some type, but remember you will/may need to solder within the proximity  of the damaged area.

If solder is used as a filler where adjacent constructional soldering will subsequently take place, it's wise (in my experience) to use a higher melting point solder for the former task - say electrical solder. Then, turn the wick down for the latter. It does work and doesn't melt the filler solder.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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A good two part epoxy (J. B. Weld here in Canada) to fill in  the dents after roughing up and degreasing the surface.  Then before it sets use a cotton bud soaked in varsol to smooth and rough shape the surface, this can safe a lot of sanding. Repeat if necessary and finish off with a quality automobile glazing/spot putty or Milliput,  sand to shape and finish using wet and dry.  For a non expert it is a lot safer that trying to fill with solder and you will have to use spot putty anyway. 

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The best thing to do when faced with making a bend is to anneal the brass in the vicinity. I use a hob on the gas cooker and heat until the brass turns red. If you don’t have a gas cooker or blow lamp find a friend who has one or the other. Let the brass cool naturally then using a dowel or pencil or whatever (slightly smaller in diameter than the bend to be formed) gently form the bend, checking continually that it is at right angles to the edge and in the right place. Do not use pliers as, on annealed brass, your fingers, or a flat piece of wood on the outside of the bend, are sufficient. If the bend is in slightly the wrong place roll your former towards the true centre and continue bending, then gently straighten out the bit that is wrong. The annealed brass will harden off over time.

 

Is this kit not part of the Ace range?

 

Ian R

 

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1 hour ago, Ian Rathbone said:

The best thing to do when faced with making a bend is to anneal the brass in the vicinity. I use a hob on the gas cooker and heat until the brass turns red. If you don’t have a gas cooker or blow lamp find a friend who has one or the other. Let the brass cool naturally then using a dowel or pencil or whatever (slightly smaller in diameter than the bend to be formed) gently form the bend, checking continually that it is at right angles to the edge and in the right place. Do not use pliers as, on annealed brass, your fingers, or a flat piece of wood on the outside of the bend, are sufficient. If the bend is in slightly the wrong place roll your former towards the true centre and continue bending, then gently straighten out the bit that is wrong. The annealed brass will harden off over time.

 

Is this kit not part of the Ace range?

 

Ian R

 

Thanks Ian,

 

I’ve never tried annealing but I’ll give it a go next time.

 

My understanding is that the Ace C12 is a different kit. When Meteor Models was split up, the LNER locos went to NMRS and the Southern locos to Ace. I was recommended the Meteor C12 kit and followed it up with the guy who used to run Meteor. He explained what happened to his kits. He also told me that his C12 was originally drawn up by Jim Mcgeown of Connoisseur Models.

 

Thanks also to all the people who’ve offered me advice on the roof filling. I’m happiest with solder (I think it must be a result of my training with ‘Sir’ ) so I’ll try that first and then resort to epoxy, filler or filler primer as necessary in the painting stage.

 

Andy

 

 

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Morning Tony

You must have come across these people many times when you have been attending exhibitions , never happy till they find a fault with something ! 

A  “friend “ of mine and my brothers would look at one of our finished kit built locos till he found something to pass a negative comment on , never a complement ,  and yes he couldn’t two pieces of anything together.

So I guess it’s human nature that some people aren’t happy unless they are moaning , and the rest of us ! carry on doing what makes us happy.

 Dennis 

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Hi Tony,

 

It’s a lovely morning in God’s Own Country too. The sun is shining and the sea gently sloshing about as befits the day.

 

I think we have to accept that people who consider themselves to be an authority on a subject, commonly demonstrate a disconnect with the level of modelling skill and/or expertise also on display.

 

It is all too easy to spot issues like mis-aligned parts and the quality of running, or make a subjective observation on sound quality.... any muppet can do that.  But assessing the accuracy of a model requires familiarity with the prototype and perhaps unsurprisingly, very few of the ‘unboxing’ presenters venture make comment on this.

 

There is clearly a gap in the market for a you-tube un-boxer who actually knows their stuff.  But then again, would any serious modeller want to be associated with the unboxing scene?  The modelling press generally does product reviews much more to my liking... and is a lot more succinct too!

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Just an observation on this beautiful morning.

 

I know I'm often accused (with justification?) of tossing a metaphorical hand grenade into a metaphorical minefield, then observing the results. Could the following be an example?

 

I'll explain if I may? 

 

When I look at video clips on this site, there's always a further selection of (usually) related video content. Occasionally, I'll have a look at these where the subject matter is of particular interest. Some concern self-appointed critics commenting on products; a case in point being Hornby's latest A2/2 and A2/3 Thompson Pacifics. Now, although I must express an interest, I agree that manufacturing faults are not acceptable. However, some comments are akin to 'product assassination'! 

 

I respect the fact that everyone has an opinion, but in every case I've watched (not many, because I gave up), the layouts (if one can justify them with that description) on which the products are being criticised are absolute junk in my opinion. Hornby SetTrack laid (badly) on the floor or on carpet, dodgy curves, no attempt at realism, no ballasting and in all cases, trains running which show no observation of the prototype. They're the sort of creations I'd have been unhappy with as a raw beginner, still in short trousers and RTR-reliant. 

 

The 'bile' continues with severe criticisms of editors in some cases.

 

As I state (and have done on numerous occasions), if things are incorrect, poorly-assembled and need to be returned, these factors should be mentioned and attended to. But, some of the most-severe critics seem to be incapable of modelling to even the poorest standards. Yet, they appear to 'bite the hand that feeds them'. They (obviously?) can't do things properly themselves, so would appear to be entirely RTR-reliant. It's a wonder they have anything to run at all............

 

Just some thoughts. 

Tony

 

I think that it can be summed up as 'empty vessels make the most noise'. Now I had better shut up.

 

Lloyd

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15 minutes ago, Chamby said:

I think we have to accept that people who consider themselves to be an authority on a subject, commonly demonstrate a disconnect with the level of modelling skill and/or expertise also on display.

Is that another way of saying: 'Indefatigable self-belief in their own ability despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary'

 

It is my view that Darwinism will always spawn folks of that genre ... as it will spawn folks of all the other genres out there. I guess we all have our faults...

 

Back to the modelling ...

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3 hours ago, FarrMan said:

Tony

 

I think that it can be summed up as 'empty vessels make the most noise'. Now I had better shut up.

 

Lloyd

I've clicked 'agree', but only to your first sentence.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, D.Platt said:

Morning Tony

You must have come across these people many times when you have been attending exhibitions , never happy till they find a fault with something ! 

A  “friend “ of mine and my brothers would look at one of our finished kit built locos till he found something to pass a negative comment on , never a complement ,  and yes he couldn’t two pieces of anything together.

So I guess it’s human nature that some people aren’t happy unless they are moaning , and the rest of us ! carry on doing what makes us happy.

 Dennis 

Good afternoon Dennis,

 

I think compliments should be complemented by criticism as well. By that, I mean 'constructive' criticism; something which has been aired many, many times before on here. 

 

As is known, I seek it out, and have been known to dish it out on occasions. In only one case (out of hundreds) has the subject of my 'criticism' given up. As I, too, have not given up when (quite correctly) my work has been 'criticised'. 

 

Where I take issue with the self-appointed (modern?) critics (as it would appear you do) is that they rarely show anyone what they've made, and I'm not surprised. It's rubbish!

 

Anyway, as Graham suggests - back to modelling. In my case that means getting all the necessary stuff together for building the forthcoming Nu-Cast Partners' K2 when it arrives. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

Edited by Tony Wright
typo error
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Tony

I'd suggest that another element in what your seeing is that the rise of the interweb makes it possible for anyone to say anything and go unpunished in any way; if repeated in a pub or similar, some of it would earn a punch on the nose, but there is no equivalent on the web.

The underlying worry is that thise concern actually lack any social skills, relying instead on their ability as 'keyboard warriors', and sadly, they then attract sycophantic 'followers' around them who agree with, and believe in, every bit of tosh that they come out with.

I doubt that the inventor of the web intended it to be this way.

Tony

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I think compliments should be complemented by criticism as well. By that, I mean 'constructive' criticism; something which has been aired many, many times before on here. 

 

Agreed. My daughter's primary school have a good way of managing this (although no doubt many regular readers on this thread will bemoan it as namby-pamby modern teaching).

 

On each item of work they're assessing they aim to provide two positive bits of feedback together with one item that needs more work. Think along the lines of "you've done a good job with your soldering and quartering but you need to take more care over your preparing of the model before painting it". The encouragement ensures that they stay positive and engaged in what they're doing even if they're struggling.

 

Steven B.

 

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