Jump to content

Please use M,M&M only for topics that do not fit within other forum areas. All topics posted here await admin team approval to ensure they don't belong elsewhere.

Wright writes.....


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Just in for photography/review, are these...................

 

1247140727_HornbyCoronationScotcars01.jpg.a570abdf28a62e05bf8cfc97044c36e4.jpg

 

This 'Coronation Scot' TO from Hornby has a 'put-together' issue; no matter how hard I try, the central part of the underframe (both sides) won't clip into the body as designed. I'll investigate.

 

1698940311_HornbyCoronationScotcars02.jpg.421206044be34ebb6e1e024b5fd02195.jpg

 

The Kitchen Car's fit is perfect. 

 

I have to say, the overall finish is superb.

 

Does anyone have any opinions on this new range of cars, one way or the other? 

 

 

Beautiful models.  I live in hope of an LNER streamliner of equal quality. 

 

How about a quiet word with Simon?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, 30368 said:

 

Sorry to be a bit late with a comment - gardening requires attention - Mrs B rightly reminded me.

 

Afternoon Tony,

 

I could not agree more with your sentiment although unlike you I also have a lot of "ready to run" loco's from the usual suspects. The diversion, challenge and satisfaction of building your own loco (or coach etc..anything else for the layout) is good for one's wellbeing apart from all the other "rewards".

However, I remember a comment from one of the hobby's guru's (Ian Rice I think?) some time ago.. "its all a fantastic waste of time really..." or words to that effect. So perhaps we need to keep the role our hobby plays in our lives in context. Much more important things in life than our hobby.....I think:keeporder:

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

Thanks Richard,

 

The 'I made that' is very much a personal comment.

 

And, I'm very much a 'poacher turned gamekeeper' when it comes to RTR. Why else would I assist manufacturers (in a small way) with their product developments?

 

I don't know if was Iain Rice who coined the phrase you mention, but it has a ring of truth about it. I recall Chris Hawkins (of Irwell) and I once wringing our hands in frustration over an error in one of my books; only for both of us to reflect 'It ain't a cure for cancer, anyway'; which rather puts it into context.

 

That said, I'm sure the hobby of railway modelling has been a Godsend to many during lockdown(s). It's certainly helped me to retain some of my (not much left) sanity. Not only that, it's been much more than a hobby to me; it's been a means of earning a living, which also puts it into context. 

 

Returning to the 'I made that' comment, it's in no way a boast. For instance, I've (grudgingly) noted that the recent Thompson Pacifics from Hornby have proven to be as good (if not better) than any equivalent I've made, other than in the livery interpretation; but, the painting of mine has nothing to do with me! 

 

It's just that, I always enjoy a 'story'; whether I tell it (with a fair bit of embellishment) or, better still, I'm told one. What really has the guy/girl got to tell me if all he/she has to show me is their ability to pay for an article, then put it on the track, then run it? 

 

A personalpoint of view, of course.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.

  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, 2750Papyrus said:

Beautiful models.  I live in hope of an LNER streamliner of equal quality. 

 

How about a quiet word with Simon?

The subject has been discussed...........

 

The problem for any RTR manufacturer is that to produce any of the LNER streamliners will require complete, entirely new tooling. 

 

Hornby's recent (and beautiful) 'Coronation Scot' set has been able to use a large amount of the tooling from previous LMS carriages the firm has made. Yes, there has been some new tooling needed, but nowhere near as would be necessary for the making of the LNER streamliners. 

 

I'm sure a 'Coronation'/'West Riding'/spare set would be popular, but, in original condition, a whole train will be needed. Granted, the 'Coronation Scot' in its current livery would only run as a complete set, but post-War all that's needed is a repaint (I believe), and the individual cars can drop into ordinary trains with ease. It's not just a repaint for the ex-LNER streamliners post-War (though some cars retained dual blue for a short time in BR days). Skirtings will have to go, solebar coverings in many cases and extra doors will be needed. These are major retooling imperatives. 

 

We can live in hope, though I've already built all the types I need!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Informative/Useful 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Going back to the 'droopy t/l coupling from a couple of pages ago.... when I used to use them _I'm an S&W convert nowadays), if I had any of the slip 'modern type that drooped, they were soon cured by adding a slver of thin plasticard under the coupling, when pushed into the housing.

 

Stewart

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Just in for photography/review, are these................... 'Coronation Scot' 

 

Does anyone have any opinions on this new range of cars, one way or the other? 

 

 

Does this count as an opinion?

 

DSC01144.JPG.cefae24ae67e99d25039818afeb4827b.JPG

 

As a complete trainset, with matching loco, it is a fantastic sight. I splashed out as a little indulgence, mainly with exhibitions in mind. With a suitable trainset to run it on, it should hopefully be an eye-catching sight to entertain show visitors.

 

As individual vehicles, they add additional Stanier coaches to the Hornby range HOWEVER the roofs are with the pressure ventilation duct moulded in as a single unit, rather than attached separately, so straight re-liverying into ordinary service condition would not appear to be a straightforward option.

 

The exception is the 50ft kitchen cars as you have illustrated as they do not have the PV ducting fitted. However, there is a quirk here as well. It was 'discovered' by several purchasers that the kitchen cars run on 8 foot bogies as opposed to the standard 9 foot bogies of the other cars. It turns out that, whereas standard service kitchen cars ran on the usual 9 foot bogies, for reasons that aren't totally clear, the kitchen cars that were prepared for the Coronation Scot were fitted with 8 foot bogies which appears to be a retrograde step. (I wonder whether it was to create extra space underneath for larger gas tanks?) Full marks to Hornby however for researching this and creating a separate bogie type. However, in doing so - yes there's another 'however' - the side frames appear to be set ever so slightly (a 'twitch' in your language) too far apart meaning that the wheelsets don't run properly as a pin point bearing. Try pushing the one you have along the track and see if it runs freely ... or not.

 

Overall - a notable project from Hornby which I think they have pulled off very well, only requiring a few little tweaks by the modeller to make it truly top drawer. And - as ever - how much time and effort would you spend to create something similar?

 

 

Edited by LNER4479
  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites

Model Railways are quiet a global phenomena.  Last night watching a railway journey video in China, the author showed the Bachmann shop in Shanghai station.  Three full display cases,  Some pretty neat stuff.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A2/3 'Mushy Peas' has taken a bit of a back seat, while a much bigger project has been progressing. Whilst that project is in the drying phase again, a quick recap on 'Mushy'. I carried out a paint test on the right hand side rear driving wheel. I feel that this is a much improved LNER green. It's a very close match to that used by Laurie Loveless on his Gauge One and O gauge LNER locomotives, he uses the same paint supplier as the LNER. I shall try a couple of further paint tests before the final repaint decision is made and a bit of surgery is required on the tender but all being well, 'Mushy Peas' will  be requiring a new name and number quite soon.

 

 

208487285_LNERgreenreardrvingwheeltest.jpg.5fcc49f05317b1039041925d8fa4586c.jpg

 

 

 

  • Like 13
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
57 minutes ago, stewartingram said:

Going back to the 'droopy t/l coupling from a couple of pages ago.... when I used to use them _I'm an S&W convert nowadays), if I had any of the slip 'modern type that drooped, they were soon cured by adding a slver of thin plasticard under the coupling, when pushed into the housing.

 

Stewart

But droop is not their worst problem the loops are too darn small. I very much doubt you could back a rake of those new LMS coaches over a set track reverse curve. OK most people who buy them won’t but if 2nd radius is supposed to be the acceptable minimum for modern r-t-r locomotives manufacturers need to supply a coupling across their range that can cope with it.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, LNER4479 said:

 

Does this count as an opinion?

 

DSC01144.JPG.cefae24ae67e99d25039818afeb4827b.JPG

 

As a complete trainset, with matching loco, it is a fantastic sight. I splashed out as a little indulgence, mainly with exhibitions in mind. With a suitable trainset to run it on, it should hopefully be an eye-catching sight to entertain show visitors.

 

As individual vehicles, they add additional Stanier coaches to the Hornby range HOWEVER the roofs are with the pressure ventilation duct moulded in as a single unit, rather than attached separately, so straight re-liverying into ordinary service condition would not appear to be a straightforward option.

 

The exception is the 50ft kitchen cars as you have illustrated as they do not have the PV ducting fitted. However, there is a quirk here as well. It was 'discovered' by several purchasers that the kitchen cars run on 8 foot bogies as opposed to the standard 9 foot bogies of the other cars. It turns out that, whereas standard service kitchen cars ran on the usual 9 foot bogies, for reasons that aren't totally clear, the kitchen cars that were prepared for the Coronation Scot were fitted with 8 foot bogies which appears to be a retrograde step. (I wonder whether it was to create extra space underneath for larger gas tanks?) Full marks to Hornby however for researching this and creating a separate bogie type. However, in doing so - yes there's another 'however' - the side frames appear to be set ever so slightly (a 'twitch' in your language) too far apart meaning that the wheelsets don't run properly as a pin point bearing. Try pushing the one you have along the track and see if it runs freely ... or not.

 

Overall - a notable project from Hornby which I think they have pulled off very well, only requiring a few little tweaks by the modeller to make it truly top drawer. And - as ever - how much time and effort would you spend to create something similar?

 

 

A very worthwhile opinion!

 

I thought the coaches retained the pressure ventilation into BR days, Graham. 

 

Didn't Robert Carroll show a picture of one in a BR service train some little time ago?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Edited by Tony Wright
to add something
Link to post
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

A2/3 'Mushy Peas' has taken a bit of a back seat, while a much bigger project has been progressing. Whilst that project is in the drying phase again, a quick recap on 'Mushy'. I carried out a paint test on the right hand side rear driving wheel. I feel that this is a much improved LNER green. It's a very close match to that used by Laurie Loveless on his Gauge One and O gauge LNER locomotives, he uses the same paint supplier as the LNER. I shall try a couple of further paint tests before the final repaint decision is made and a bit of surgery is required on the tender but all being well, 'Mushy Peas' will  be requiring a new name and number quite soon.

 

 

208487285_LNERgreenreardrvingwheeltest.jpg.5fcc49f05317b1039041925d8fa4586c.jpg

 

 

 

Hello Andrew, that's very interesting.

Can you please tell us how you would describe - and how you achieved - the difference in colour? What I mean is, does your new version include more yellow, or some other colour? Would you say it's has a slightly more 'olive' tinge, compared to "Mushy's" original shade being perhaps slightly minty? Is there perhaps more blue in that original shade, the one still on the rest of the loco?

Quite understand if you prefer not to share techniques you're still working on - I'm asking because I'm struggling with matching and judging some of the greens in use on the GNR and LNER and have been reading quite a bit, trying to make sense of descriptions and relate them to various samples, photos and so forth. I'd like to understand more about what makes different shades of a colour appear so different...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Chas Levin said:

Hello Andrew, that's very interesting.

Can you please tell us how you would describe - and how you achieved - the difference in colour? What I mean is, does your new version include more yellow, or some other colour? Would you say it's has a slightly more 'olive' tinge, compared to "Mushy's" original shade being perhaps slightly minty? Is there perhaps more blue in that original shade, the one still on the rest of the loco?

Quite understand if you prefer not to share techniques you're still working on - I'm asking because I'm struggling with matching and judging some of the greens in use on the GNR and LNER and have been reading quite a bit, trying to make sense of descriptions and relate them to various samples, photos and so forth. I'd like to understand more about what makes different shades of a colour appear so different...

 

Good evening Chas,

 

you are correct, the Hornby colour is in the cold/blue end of the colour temperature spectrum when it should be in the warm end (yellow/red) The same is true of their BR green. Fortunately, there are many paint manufactures out there that can help you along, as they have produced superior renditions of LNER and BR green. If you wish to go further, they can also be easier to customise than mixing from scratch. Think of the LNER colour in terms of a English meadow on a summers day. The LNER and GNR referred to it as Grass green but if you like apples, then few would consider an apple to be mint coloured. 

  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
10 hours ago, Mallard60022 said:

I have absolutely no records of these coaches working north, or east of London on other Regions, not even on the long distance, summer holiday trains from the Midlands and North to the South (usually Bournemouth) and West (including Sidmouth and Exmouth). 

I haven't seen any evidence of them on services through Snow Hill. My recollection of these was that the summer trains were mainly Maunsells and some long Bulleids until the Kent Cost electrification when the Mk1s appeared on some services. A lot of the Bournemouths went via New Street and the S&D and were largely LMS and LNER stock, although I have seen an instance of Bullieds at Bromsgrove, just need to find it again but I think they were long ones.

  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, 30368 said:

However, I remember a comment from one of the hobby's guru's (Ian Rice I think?) some time ago.. "its all a fantastic waste of time really..." or words to that effect. So perhaps we need to keep the role our hobby plays in our lives in context. Much more important things in life than our hobby.....I think:keeporder:

 

I think that quote sounds rather like Oscar Wilde's, "All art is quite useless".  At first reading it's easy to misunderstand what he meant, which is that the things in life that have no real use or importance, are what make life worth living.

  • Round of applause 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

A very worthwhile opinion!

 

I thought the coaches retained the pressure ventilation into BR days, Graham 

Sorry Tony, I didn't explain myself very well. Unlike the LNER streamlined trains, the Coronation Scot vehicles were not purpose designed for the train, they were just examples of regular Stanier coaching stock 'blinged up' for the train. Other examples of the same diagram number were running around in other trains.

 

So my point is that, in creating the Coro Scot train, Hornby have added further diagram numbers to the pool of Stanier RTR vehicles available. But they can't easily be turned out as other 'everyday' examples of the same vehicle type because of the moulded PV roofs, except for the kitchen cars (which would then need 9 foot versus 8 foot bogies ...)

Edited by LNER4479
  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, 2750Papyrus said:

Beautiful models.  I live in hope of an LNER streamliner of equal quality. 

 

How about a quiet word with Simon?

I mentioned it in a recent email with Simon. I said I hope the Coronation Scot sells really well so they consider doing an LNER Coronation.

I've actually got a Mailcoach set stashed away (for more than 25 years) but I've got too many pre-grouping brass coaches to build plus locos that I know now I'll never get around to the Coronation!

Andrew

Edited by Woodcock29
Additional comment
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, andytrains said:

Why, after all these years are we using Tension Lock Couplings?

They are obtrusive and detract from models.

And don't get me started about the monstrosities they put on N gauge models.

Just my opinion!

Hi Andy

 

I do because they work and as a one man operator at home I cannot be bothered with any other type.

  • Like 7
  • Agree 2
  • Round of applause 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

This 'Coronation Scot' TO from Hornby has a 'put-together' issue; no matter how hard I try, the central part of the underframe (both sides) won't clip into the body as designed. I'll investigate.

Speaking from a position of total ignorance, I wonder if the underframe is the wrong way round (i.e. if you try to fit it the right way round it doesn't fit but if you fit it the wrong way round it does).

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Iain.d said:

We have had some very wet and stormy weather in Perth over the last day or so which has meant I had to spend more time indoors modelling, rather than outside tidying up the garden…

 

The time has allowed me to finish off part of a breakdown train that I’m putting together.  I cut down a Ratio Lavatory Brake Third bogie carriage and converted it to a 6 wheel 31ft MR Clerestory to be used as a crew coach. Its finished in dark grey (Vallejo German Tank Crew 333). The transfers I did myself, basing the wording on images I found on the internet and finished with a sprayed matt varnish.  The W irons are Bill Bedford and the chassis/underframe built from plastic sheet, brass strip and wire. It has Midland sprung buffers and screw couplings.

 

172104792_Ratio6WheelConversion(06).jpg.3089a46900616f560ba41ee10e6563e5.jpg

 

It’ll be paired up with this Worsley Works Caledonian Railway 45ft Full Brake masquerading as a tool van.  There’s a little modellers licence here as none of these brakes survived beyond about 1937 and my current period of interest is the 1950s, which going on recent discussions of when we base our models, is about 15 years before I was born. This kit soldered together beautifully, literally ‘falling together’. It is running on Roxey Fox bogies and has sprung buffers – these are LNWR ones as I couldn’t seem to find the right Caledonian Railway ones. I need to cut down or paint the bogie fixing/mounting screws. 

 

1622322185_CaledonianRailway45ftFullBrake(07).jpg.fda694ca935bf502117ab6f6875c173d.jpg

 

It sits much lower than the 6 wheeler; both are the right height (I think) but I suspect the Full Brake had gas lamps on the roof, where I have put the vents, and also some sort of skylight box on the roof. Certainly some of the very similar LNWR Full Brakes seemed to have this feature.

 

989250531_Ratio6WheelCR45ftFullBrake.jpg.b065bb49710d46970ed116d446c4a8ed.jpg

 

In the queue to build soon is the accompanying D&S Cowan Sheldon 15T crane and its match truck.

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

I have been eager to see your work and the result was worth the wait,well done. Doug.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Speaking from a position of total ignorance, I wonder if the underframe is the wrong way round (i.e. if you try to fit it the right way round it doesn't fit but if you fit it the wrong way round it does).

 

 

I'd never thought of that, John.

 

I'll investigate, though I won't be doing anything to these coaches by way of 'upgrades' (as with the recent Hornby Thompson Pacifics) and they'll end up generating money for charities once I've reviewed them...........................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Headstock said:

 

Good evening Chas,

 

you are correct, the Hornby colour is in the cold/blue end of the colour temperature spectrum when it should be in the warm end (yellow/red) The same is true of their BR green. Fortunately, there are many paint manufactures out there that can help you along, as they have produced superior renditions of LNER and BR green. If you wish to go further, they can also be easier to customise than mixing from scratch. Think of the LNER colour in terms of a English meadow on a summers day. The LNER and GNR referred to it as Grass green but if you like apples, then few would consider an apple to be mint coloured. 

Morning Andrew, many thanks, food for thought (no pun intended with apples, mint etc!) :D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

Sorry Tony, I didn't explain myself very well. Unlike the LNER streamlined trains, the Coronation Scot vehicles were not purpose designed for the train, they were just examples of regular Stanier coaching stock 'blinged up' for the train. Other examples of the same diagram number were running around in other trains.

 

So my point is that, in creating the Coro Scot train, Hornby have added further diagram numbers to the pool of Stanier RTR vehicles available. But they can't easily be turned out as other 'everyday' examples of the same vehicle type because of the moulded PV roofs, except for the kitchen cars (which would then need 9 foot versus 8 foot bogies ...)

It's more my being obtuse, Graham.

 

On the 'positive' side, however (I assume), all that's needed is a repaint into carmine/cream or maroon, and all these cars can then be used on a layout depicting BR days up to their withdrawal.

 

Another assumption............... The set didn't run in the War? I know the new set was marooned (in maroon) in America for the duration.  Were the original cars used then in general trains, still painted stripey blue?

 

Returning to the (properly-streamlined) LNER equivalents, as mentioned, post-War there is no such 'just repaint, ease of use' for any putative models. Not only that, all of the types (apart from the two Observation Cars) were either twin articulated or triple articulated. As far as I know, nobody has dipped their RTR toes into that murky water (other than Hornby-Dublo, pre-War, but nobody uses those as 'scale' models). Which means that each pair will be either twice the price, or each triple three times the price of the LMS cars. Maybe that won't matter if the idea (as with you) is to sell the whole train, though post-War, when the sets no longer ran complete, it might be a barrier to sale.  Yes, I know there are fewer bogies needed, but all those bogies will have to be entirely new tooling. Nobody has ever produced (as far as I know) and RTR HD 8' 6" Gresley bogie, nor a 10' 0" one. 

 

I suppose one 'selling point' with the LNER trains is that all of the the three streamlined services could be produced by making one eight-car rake (and the Observation Cars for the 'Coronation'). When 'The Silver Jubilee' rake was out of service, the spare 'Coronation'/'West Riding' set was employed, carrying 'Silver Jubilee' roof boards. The raised tumbleholme branding for the 'Coronation' and 'West Riding' might be an issue; I don't know. At least we should be spared the total nonsense of a 'Silver Jubilee' being offered by Hornby using silver-painted LMS cars! The firm used to do it. 

 

Has the Hornby 'CS' been offered at a 'whole train price'? I wonder if Hornby will produce the cars in post-War mode. If they did, I'm sure they'd sell as individuals. 

 

Interesting times.....................

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 2
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

A bit left of field on the named trains debate and possibly daft. What of the possibility of the Thompson Flying Scotsman/Capitals/Elizabethan pressure ventilated stock. I fully appreciate that Bachmann do the non pressure ventilated Thompsons and we're still waiting for maroon versions.

But if Hornby did the pressure ventilated cars they'd have the same underframe as mentioned with the Coronation Scot vehicles and were cascaded on to other services later in life.

Personally I would have thought that a restaurant Triplet of some description would be a good addition. But it didn't sore that highly in the poll run on Gilberts thread as I expected.

If Hornby wanted to have a flag ship LNER train, Thompsons suitable to make any three named trains including the BG, catering core, the ladies retiring rooms etc maybe a possibility?

Probably not as high a visual impact as a Coronation/West Riding, but A4 hauled and longer lived.

Edited by davidw
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, davidw said:

A bit left of field on the named trains debate and possibly daft. What of the possibility of the Thompson Flying Scotsman/Capitals/Elizabethan pressure ventilated stock. I fully appreciate that Bachmann do the non pressure ventilated Thompsons and we're still waiting for maroon versions.

But if Hornby did the pressure ventilated cars they'd have the same underframe as mentioned with the Coronation Scot vehicles and were cascaded on to other services later in life.

Personally I would have thought that a restaurant Triplet of some description would be a good addition. But it didn't sore that highly in the poll run on Gilberts thread as I expected.

If Hornby wanted to have a flag ship LNER train, Thompsons suitable to make any three named trains including the BG, catering core, the ladies retiring rooms etc maybe a possibility?

Probably not as high a visual impact as a Coronation/West Riding, but A4 hauled and longer lived.

An interested thought, David.

 

Especially as one of the Buffet Cars survives in preservation.

 

It would still mean making RTR HD Gresley bogies, however. 

 

I have to say, I rather find this whole RTR debate as to what might sell a bit amusing. 'Modellers', down the generations, have always made things for themselves (in years past, everything). 

 

When WMRC built Stoke Summit, instead of 'wishing and hoping and thinking and praying' that RTR manufacturers would produce the rolling stock we needed (this was pre-Bachmann Mk.1s), we, as a group, either built the available kits or designed and produced them (via Dave Lewis of Southern Pride), the Thompson PV stock being a case in point. 

 

I agree, not everyone has access to such 'resources', but it only took some initiative, linked with some skills, of course, and the modelling world was our oyster. 

 

Jol Wilkinson suggested once to 'build a kit' (I believe he still does - good on him!). One friend was with me at the time, and immediately bleated 'What if one can't build a kit?' I immediately responded by saying two things......... 'Tough, and/or, if you can't/can, get someone else to do your modelling for you!'. Which he does.................

 

I'm not denying that the availability of such high-quality RTR stuff these days has done wonders for the hobby, and it's made it much more egalitarian. That said, I can understand how so many 'real' modellers prefer to go further and further back in time with their creations because, out of necessity, they have to make things for themselves. I commend them.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

An interested thought, David.

 

Especially as one of the Buffet Cars survives in preservation.

 

It would still mean making RTR HD Gresley bogies, however. 

 

I have to say, I rather find this whole RTR debate as to what might sell a bit amusing. 'Modellers', down the generations, have always made things for themselves (in years past, everything). 

 

When WMRC built Stoke Summit, instead of 'wishing and hoping and thinking and praying' that RTR manufacturers would produce the rolling stock we needed (this was pre-Bachmann Mk.1s), we, as a group, either built the available kits or designed and produced them (via Dave Lewis of Southern Pride), the Thompson PV stock being a case in point. 

 

I agree, not everyone has access to such 'resources', but it only took some initiative, linked with some skills, of course, and the modelling world was our oyster. 

 

Jol Wilkinson suggested once to 'build a kit' (I believe he still does - good on him!). One friend was with me at the time, and immediately bleated 'What if one can't build a kit?' I immediately responded by saying two things......... 'Tough, and/or, if you can't/can, get someone else to do your modelling for you!'. Which he does.................

 

I'm not denying that the availability of such high-quality RTR stuff these days has done wonders for the hobby, and it's made it much more egalitarian. That said, I can understand how so many 'real' modellers prefer to go further and further back in time with their creations because, out of necessity, they have to make things for themselves. I commend them.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I  agree, particularly as I've got many/most of the stock I mention I've got. Residing building items locos and rolling stock is do-able. Mostly thanks to your aid and the Right track DVDs. But with an ever shrinking pool of prototypes to chose from, it does make one wonder what will sell be it kit or RTR?

Edited by davidw
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...